Youssef Chouhoud

Youssef Chouhoud

Youssef Chouhoud

Fellow

Disclaimer: the work linked below reflects the view of the author and does not necessarily reflect the view of ISPU.

Youssef Chouhoud is a PhD candidate in the Political Science and International Relations program at the University of Southern California. As a Provost’s Fellow, his research interests include political attitudes and behavior, survey methodology, and comparative democratization.

Youssef’s dissertation theorizes the changing contours of political tolerance in both established and nascent democracies. Through original survey analysis, experimental findings, and in-depth elite interviews, his project demonstrates how group identity conditions the expression of liberal norms. This comparative examination of tolerance offers new theoretical and empirical traction for public opinion researchers, while also providing practical insights for community advocates and rights activists.

Prior to enrolling at USC, Youssef earned a bachelor’s degree in History at Lehigh University where, as a President’s Scholar, he went on to complete a master’s degree in Political Science. He is an alum of the American Muslim Civic Leadership Institute and a Fellow at the Yaqeen Institute for Islamic Research.

Education

BA, MA, Lehigh University; PhD candidate, University of Southern California

Areas of Expertise

  1. Race and Ethnic Politics
  2. Religion and Politics
  3. Survey Analysis

Publications

  • A significant proportion of American Muslims are immigrants, with the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding’s (ISPU) 2018 American Muslim Poll finding that 49% were born outside the United States. Given the often (and, at times, vastly) differing life experiences between native-born and foreign-born American...

  • Muslims in America fare better socioeconomically than other minority Muslim populations around the globe, such as French or British Muslims, on average. This point has supported claims that American Muslims are well-integrated and “mostly mainstream.” The ever-expanding universe of successful Muslim entrepreneurs helps further this...

  • If there is anything that three consecutive years of ISPU’s American Muslim Poll has shown, it is that Muslims are not a monolithic community. From racial and ethnic diversity to the various ways that individuals interact with society and each other, Muslims in America are...

  • This is a summary of the key findings of ISPU’s annual poll, which returns for a third year to measure the attitudes and policy preferences that impact the lives of American Muslims across faith communities, including results from Catholics, Protestants, Jews, white Evangelicals, and the...

  • ISPU’s annual poll returns for a third year to measure the attitudes and policy preferences that impact the lives of American Muslims across faith communities, including results from Catholics, Protestants, Jews, white Evangelicals, and the non-affiliated. In American Muslim Poll 2018: Pride and Prejudice, we...

  • The answer may surprise you. Following a terror attack bearing the hallmarks of ISIS or other such groups, it is now customary for Muslim leaders to issue public condemnations. Should that be the case? On the one hand, immediately condemning such acts preempts (and, ideally,...

  • Latino Americans in the general public and Muslims of all ethnic backgrounds hold similar views of the current political climate. This analysis is Part 2 in a two-part series on intersectionality. Read Part 1. In our previous piece on intersectionality, we examined the extent to...

  • Muslim Americans share common struggles with other marginalized communities. This analysis is Part 1 in a two-part series on intersectionality. Read Part 2. Although the term “intersectionality” has been around for decades in academic circles, it has only recently gained widespread salience. This idea that one’s...

  • Marriage is a perennial topic in American Muslim circles—alternatively a source of joy or anxiety depending on the context. On the one hand, the centrality of marriage should come as no surprise given the numerous textual prescriptions (both in Quran and hadith) lauding and encouraging...

  • The 2016 election was supposed to be a political coming of age for the American Muslim voter. The received wisdom in the months leading up to November was that the nomination of Donald Trump—through a combination of fear and heightened civic duty—would drive record numbers...

  • Charitable giving is an essential component of many faith traditions. It is not surprising, then, that the religiously affiliated and those who regularly attend religious services tend to donate more often than their non-affiliated or less religious counterparts. What’s more, although the proportion of donations...

  • This is a summary of the key findings of ISPU’s American Muslim Poll 2017: Muslims at the Crossroads, a poll which offers a timely and groundbreaking look into the American Muslim community. From early on in a deeply divisive presidential election cycle until today, American...

  • American Muslim Poll 2017: Muslims at the Crossroads offers a timely and groundbreaking look into the American Muslim community. From early on in a deeply divisive presidential election cycle until today, American Muslims have been at the center of heated social and political debates. One byproduct...

  • One of the hallmark theories in political science is the so-called “paradox of voting.” The reward citizens get from casting a ballot, according to this model, is a function of the benefit accrued from their preferred candidate being elected, multiplied by the probability that their...

Other Works

Berry, Justin, Youssef Chouhoud, and Jane Junn. “Reaching Beyond Low-Hanging Fruit: Surveying Low Incidence Populations.” In The Oxford Handbook of Polling and Polling Methods. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016.

Chouhoud, Youssef. “Modern Pathways to Doubt in Islam.” Dallas, TX: Yaqeen Institute for Islamic Research, 2016.