COVID-19 Toolkit

Resources for Online Learning, Community Support, and Mental Health Maintenance

The emergence of COVID-19 in the United States has profoundly altered American life. Mandated social distancing has led to school and work closures, rising unemployment, and much more time spent at home caring for the health and well-being of family members. During these anxious times, ISPU’s research can help guide and inform. This toolkit rounds up new events and relevant research that inform our current national moment.

Meira Neggaz

A MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Just like all of you, we are watching the COVID-19 challenge play out on an almost hourly basis. Like all of you, we are trying to balance concern for the health and safety of our team, our supporters, and our partners with the need to continue our vital work. Luckily, much of ISPU’s work can be done remotely.

We’re thinking of all of you who have done the right thing and decided to socially distance as much as possible, those who are suddenly teaching children and caring for others in your home, and those whose work requires suiting up, showing up, and putting yourself in harm’s way to assist all of us—healthcare personnel, first responders, social service providers, delivery drivers, mail carriers, grocery store employees, and so many others.

As for us at ISPU, we have ramped up our virtual research-sharing opportunities to keep you engaged with learning opportunities during our time at home. We are also equipping leaders to tackle the current challenges and pave the way for a better future. Lastly, we are collecting data so that when we emerge from this crisis, we will be able to learn from it.

While we have cancelled or postponed all of our live research-sharing and donor events, we still want to keep in touch in a safe way. So, if you’re not already, follow what we’re up to via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and our email newsletter. And bookmark our calendar for event updates on new webinars and other virtual opportunities.

Meira Neggaz

ISPU Executive Director

COVID-19 Toolkit

Resources for Online Learning, Community Support, and Mental Health Maintenance

The emergence of COVID-19 in the United States has profoundly altered American life. Mandated social distancing has led to school and work closures, rising unemployment, and much more time spent at home caring for the health and well-being of family members. During these anxious times, ISPU’s research can help guide and inform. This toolkit rounds up new events and relevant research that inform our current national moment.

Meira Neggaz

A MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Just like all of you, we are watching the COVID-19 challenge play out on an almost hourly basis. Like all of you, we are trying to balance concern for the health and safety of our team, our supporters, and our partners with the need to continue our vital work. Luckily, much of ISPU’s work can be done remotely.

We’re thinking of all of you who have done the right thing and decided to socially distance as much as possible, those who are suddenly teaching children and caring for others in your home, and those whose work requires suiting up, showing up, and putting yourself in harm’s way to assist all of us—healthcare personnel, first responders, social service providers, delivery drivers, mail carriers, grocery store employees, and so many others.

As for us at ISPU, we have ramped up our virtual research-sharing opportunities to keep you engaged with learning opportunities during our time at home.

While we have cancelled or postponed all of our live research-sharing and donor events, we still want to keep in touch in a safe way. So, if you’re not already, follow what we’re up to via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and our email newsletter. And bookmark our calendar for event updates on new webinars and other virtual opportunities.

Meira Neggaz

ISPU Executive Director

Documenting the American Muslim Response to the COVID-19 Crisis

map of muslim contributions

ISPU set out to document the impact of American Muslims in the fight against COVID-19. This research project includes a quantitative measurement of contributions in each state, collected via survey and including everything from providing healthcare workers with mental health support to donating much-needed funds to meet the basic needs of families who have been hardest hit by the crisis. It will also include stories of individuals and communities that took action to alleviate or prevent the suffering around them. This collection of contributions will serve as a living document, recording the story of American Muslim impact during this unprecedented moment in history.

Explore contributions by state and category, then add your own!

Digital Learning Events

A blue circle with "#WW" inside

#WisdomWednesday

During this new weekly series of scholar takeovers of ISPU’s Facebook page, you can join a live conversation discussing some of the vast array of topics in which our scholars are experts. Contribute your questions in the comments during weekly Facebook Live on Wednesdays and browse the list of scholars you may be hearing from.

An icon representing a webinar

New Webinars on Current Challenges

While all of our in-person research-sharing events have been cancelled or postponed for the time being, we’re ramping up our webinar opportunities to share timely research—and you can join from the comfort of your couch! Bookmark our calendar for information on our ever-growing list of webinars.

In icon of a figure of a person in a computer

Request a Virtual ISPU Educator

Interested in hosting an online virtual learning event for your community group or civic organization? Our ISPU Educators are expert presenters on research about American Muslims. During this challenging time, there may be an opportunity for them to present data virtually to your group. Contact us at research@ispu.org to learn more.

Get Your Scholarly Questions Answered

Every Wednesday, you can join a Facebook Live conversation with an ISPU scholar in our #WisdomWednesday series. Here’s our current schedule:

April 1 – Sahar Khamis

Watch the recording→

April 8 – Carey Shenkman

Watch the recording→

April 15 – Nadia B. Ahmad

Watch the recording→

April 22 – Aasim Padela

Watch the recording→

April 29 – Saeed Khan

Watch the recording→

May 6 – Omar Ezzeldine

Watch the recording→

May 13 – Sahar Aziz

Watch the recording→

May 20 – Nadia Ansary

Watch the recording→

May 27 – Erik Love

Watch the recording→

June 3 @ 12 p.m. EDT – Louise Cainkar

Louis will discuss the Muslim Ban, white supremacy, and Islamophobia. Learn more about her→

June 10 @ 12 p.m. EDT – Sameera Ahmed

Sameera is the director of The Family and Youth Institute (FYI), a research institute that conducts research promoting the strengthening of young people and their families. Learn more about her→

Webinar Series - When Doors Reopen graphic

NEW WEBINAR SERIES

When Doors Reopen

This June, join us every week for a webinar series on ways to create more welcoming, dynamic, and inclusive Muslim spaces for all!

June 2 @ 3 p.m. EDT – Creating a More Welcoming Mosque for Converts

Register to join→

June 9 @ 3 p.m. EDT – Creating a More Welcoming Mosque for Young Adults

Register to join→

June 15 @ 3 p.m. EDT – Creating a More Welcoming Mosque for Women

Register to join→

June 22 @ 3 p.m. EDT – Getting Race Right: How can predominantly South Asian and Arab American mosques create inclusive environments for African American Muslims?

Register to join→

June 29 @ 3 p.m. EDT – Are Weekend Islamic Schools Preparing Children for Life Ahead?

Register to join→

Hear from ISPU Scholars Quaiser Abdullah, Manijeh Daneshpour, and Altaf Husain about maintaining healthy relationships while in quarantine.

Hear from Dr. Kameelah M. Rashad, Imam Tariq El-Amin, and Margari Hill about the current state of the COVID-19 pandemic in Black Muslim communities and the historical factors that contribute to it.

Relevant Resources

A Muslim man kneels in prayer alone at a mosque

Reimagining Muslim Spaces—Virtually

For the protection of their communities, many mosque leaders have made the difficult choice to close houses of worship during this crisis. This time can be used to reflect on how these institutions can operate when they reopen, through virtual task forces and working groups. This ISPU resource provides research-backed recommendations to make mosques and Islamic centers welcoming, well-governed sources of community service. We encourage you to send these resources to your mosque leader, follow and ask questions during our weekly #MindfulMonday posts on Facebook, and sign up for our newsletter for more information. How will the shift of religious gatherings from public to virtual spaces impact faith groups? ISPU’s analysis of private vs. public expressions of faith may provide insight into how Muslims express their faith.

A group of protesters at the 2017 No Muslim Ban Protests in DC

Coalition Building in the Time of Coronavirus

ISPU research reveals that Islamophobia is just one branch on a larger tree of bigotry that includes racial discrimination. Not only do 18% of American Muslims identify as Asian, but all Muslims experience structural and societal Islamophobia on the basis of race and religion. During this time of reported heightened anti-Asian bigotry and bias incidents, we’re sharing our data on coalition-building to combat all forms of discrimination in tandem.

Scared woman holding her hand up

Social Challenges Exacerbated by COVID-19

ISPU’s research on domestic violence and poverty is newly relevant as unemployment numbers skyrocket and abused persons are isolated alongside their abusers. Our research provides insight and analysis into both issues, newly exacerbated by COVID-19.

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Protecting Mental Health

For many, social distancing can lead to isolation, separation from community, increased caretaking responsibilities, and limited access to health care. Now more than ever, taking care of mental health is essential. This toolkit includes resources for individuals and mental health professionals to effectively address the unique mental health challenges that Muslims face.

A teacher shows a young female student how conduct a science experiment

Supporting Educators

The closure of schools means many caretakers are now in the position of administering remote education for their children, organized by educators now removed from a classroom setting. During this unprecedented upset to educational systems, teachers and administrators may have additional time to seek professional development or need more help accessing resources like handouts, videos, bibliographies, and other assets. This toolkit offers those resources to both educators and parents involved in their child’s education, and is perfect for sharing with your schools teachers and administrators.

Woman wearing an orange hijab kneeling in a mosque

ISPU | Yaqeen Talk Toolkits

As most mosques and community centers close in an attempt to limit COVID-19 exposure, those seeking spiritual nourishment have the opportunity to find new outlets online. ISPU | Yaqeen Talk Toolkits offer a series of research-packed khutbahs in written and video form. From civic engagement to combatting community racism, these khutbahs feature ISPU research through Yaqeen Institute’s faith-informed lens.

A medical professional taking the heart rate of a patient

Muslims on the Healthcare Front Lines

ISPU has a plethora of data on the impact of Muslims both working in healthcare and responding to healthcare crises. As we move through the challenge of COVID-19, return to ISPU’s analysis of how Muslims responded to the Flint Water Crisis. Then explore ISPU’s Muslims for American Progress publications, which quantify the impact of Muslim Michiganders and New Yorkers. Muslim New Yorkers comprise more than 9% of the city’s medical doctors and more than 12% of the state’s pharmacists. In New York City, the epicenter of the American COVID-19 crisis, Muslim doctors see over 5 million patients, and Muslim pharmacists fill close to 9.6 million prescriptions per year. In Michigan, while Muslims represent just 2.75% of Michigan’s total population, they make up more than 15% of the state’s licensed medical doctors, providing 1.6 million appointments to patients and filling 15 million retail drug prescriptions per year. Dive into our research findings from MAP to understand the deep impact Muslim healthcare workers will have on the front lines of this challenge.

American Muslims and Aging

Research shows COVID-19 is particularly dangerous to our aging population, a group already at risk for many challenges. ISPU’s research on American Muslims and aging provides recommendations for service providers, policymakers, religious leaders, community-based funders, and elders and their families that cover a wealth of ways to support the growing population of older adults. As we work to protect elders from the impact of COVID-19, this resource will help address their needs holistically.

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