Elections Toolkit

Resources for Political Engagement Organizers

Whether it’s time for a general, midterm, local, or special election, you can reference ISPU’s elections research on issues related to American Muslims. Use this online community toolkit to empower, inform, and improve participation in our country’s political process. From videos to presentations to full reports, our research has been repackaged to ensure accessibility for everyone in the community.

Elections Toolkit

Resources for Political Engagement Organizers

Whether it’s time for a general, midterm, local, or special election, you can reference ISPU’s elections research on issues related to American Muslims. Use this online community toolkit to empower, inform, and improve participation in our country’s political process. From videos to presentations to full reports, our research has been repackaged to ensure accessibility for everyone in the community.

Quick Links

A group of protesters at the 2017 No Muslim Ban Protests in DC

American Muslim Poll

This annual poll measures attitudes and policy preferences of American Muslims, Catholics, Protestants, Jews, white Evangelicals, and the non-affiliated. These findings provide empirical evidence that can be used to respond to stereotypes about Muslims in America.

Map of the United States

Restrictive Measures Map

This interactive map uses data from over 3100 bills across all 50 states to track which state lawmakers supported legislation targeting reproductive rights, voting rights, refugees, Muslims, and more.

Diverse Voters Filling Out Registration Forms

Briefing Book for Policymakers

Who are American Muslims? What are their policy priorities? How can elected officials best serve the needs of Muslim communities? ISPU and the Yaqeen Institute created this guide to help.

A young boy at a rally carries a sign that says "we have different religions, but we are still friends"

Islamophobia: A Threat to All

This project  deconstructs the Islamophobia industry in order to understand how it’s used as a legislative tactic.

A woman wearing a white hijab at the voting booth

American Muslims + Elections

This project provides data-driven recommendations on how each of us can be engaged in the political process, locally and nationally.

Videos

Muslims are one of the most talked-about groups in American politics, but little is known about how they’re engaged politically… until now. Here are four data-driven ways to increase American Muslim civic participation.

What do Muslims, immigrants, women, LGBTQ people, labor union members, and people of color have in common? They are all targets of restrictive legislation, often by the very same lawmakers. Watch this video to learn more.

Are you an ‪Inshallah Voter? Watch our video to find out.

How well do you know American Muslims? These facts from ISPU’s American Muslim Poll 2016 just might surprise you.

Muslim Civic Engagement Data

DATA FROM 2019

Click here to download all 24 graphs from 2019.

DATA FROM 2018

Click here to download all 34 graphs from 2018.

DATA FROM 2017

Click here to download all 42 graphs from 2017.

DATA FROM 2016

Click here to download all 14 graphs from 2016.

Presenting on American Muslims

ISPU American Muslim Poll 2019: Predicting and Preventing Islamophobia presentation

Giving a presentation on American Muslims and civic engagement? Here are our American Muslim Poll 2019 slides, filled with relevant data and ready for you to use.

Helpful Handouts

Local Political Participation Powerful Predictor of Muslim Civic Engagement Infographic
Four Data-Driven Ways to Increase Muslim Political Impact Infographic
An infographic showing how to get out the Muslim vote. 85% of Muslim plan to vote, but only 60% are registered. How do we get out the vote for the 25% of people who plan to vote but are not yet registered? What works: direct mailers thanking people for voting in past elections, knocking on doors in your community, following up with people, sending emails and texts to people you know personally, focusing on messaging that helps people to see themselves as voters. What doesn't work: sending nonpartisan reminders to vote and sending partisan mailers, using prerecorded calls, sending automated emails, using arguments such as civic duty or group solidarity.
Infographic showing the guiding principles for Muslim Political Engagement. Diversity - While differences can be challenging, the multitude of different Muslim voices can be a great benefit to national dialogue. Local and global - social change can only be achieved by constantly being present, both locally and globally. Priorities not partisanship - Focusing on principles not political parties will ensure the longterm influence of American Muslim communities. Stewardship - By concerning oneself with the well-being of the economically disadvantaged and the oppressed, Muslims display the Islamic ethics of social justice and equity.
Who Are American Muslims? Infographic
Legislation Restricting Rights Hurts All Americans infographic
Infographic showing 4 data-driven ideas for those working to increase Muslim political impact

Helpful Handouts

Local Political Participation Powerful Predictor of Muslim Civic Engagement Infographic
Four Data-Driven Ways to Increase Muslim Political Impact Infographic
An infographic showing how to get out the Muslim vote. 85% of Muslim plan to vote, but only 60% are registered. How do we get out the vote for the 25% of people who plan to vote but are not yet registered? What works: direct mailers thanking people for voting in past elections, knocking on doors in your community, following up with people, sending emails and texts to people you know personally, focusing on messaging that helps people to see themselves as voters. What doesn't work: sending nonpartisan reminders to vote and sending partisan mailers, using prerecorded calls, sending automated emails, using arguments such as civic duty or group solidarity.
Infographic showing the guiding principles for Muslim Political Engagement. Diversity - While differences can be challenging, the multitude of different Muslim voices can be a great benefit to national dialogue. Local and global - social change can only be achieved by constantly being present, both locally and globally. Priorities not partisanship - Focusing on principles not political parties will ensure the longterm influence of American Muslim communities. Stewardship - By concerning oneself with the well-being of the economically disadvantaged and the oppressed, Muslims display the Islamic ethics of social justice and equity.
Who Are American Muslims infographic
Legislation Restricting Rights Hurts All Americans infographic
Infographic showing 4 data-driven ideas for those working to increase Muslim political impact

Useful Reading

Share via
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap