Asifa Quraishi-Landes

Quraishi-Landes

Asifa Quraishi-Landes

Expert

Areas of Expertise: American Muslims, Civil Liberties, US Politics, Civil Rights, Religion, Muslims in the West

Disclaimer: the work linked below reflects the view of the author and does not necessarily reflect the view of ISPU.

Asifa Quraishi-Landes is a fellow at ISPU and an Assistant Professor of Law at University of Wisconsin Law School. She specializes in comparative Islamic and U.S.constitutional law. She was awarded a 2012 Guggenheim Fellowship for her work on Islamic constitutionalism for the 21st century. Asifa Quraishi’s recent publications include articles on comparative legal theory, Islamic criminal law, and Muslim family law in United States courts. Asifa Quraishi has served as a Public Delegate on the United States Delegation to the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, on the Task Force on Religion and the Making of U.S. Foreign Policy for the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, and as advisor to the Pew Force on Religion & Public Life. She is currently on the governing board of the National Association of Muslim Lawyers (NAML), Muslim Advocates, the Journal of Law and religion, and the Association of American Law Schools Women’s League, Karamah: Muslim Women Lawyers for Human Rights and American Muslims Intent on Learning and Activism (AMILA). She holds a doctorate from Harvard Law School and other degrees from Columbia Law School, the University of California at Davis, and the University of California at Berkeley, and has served as law clerk in the United State Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Education

S.J.D., Harvard law School, LL.M., Columbia Law School, J.D., University of California-Davis

Areas of Expertise

  1. American Muslims
  2. Civil Liberties
  3. US Politics
  4. Civil Rights
  5. Religion
  6. Muslims in the West

Publications

Against the backdrop of mass protests and violence, and the release of Hosni Mubarak from jail, Egypt's interim president Adly Mansour received draft constitutional amendments on August 21, 2013. In early July 2013, he had ordered the Legal Experts Committee to discuss controversial articles in the suspended 2012 constitution, including three related to Sharia, and…
Executive Summary The lens of state power is not the only way to see law. Jewish halakha is one example. The scholar-created doctrines of Islamic law are another. Both are complete systems of law that do not need state power in order to govern individual behavior. This is why, when American Muslims say that they…
The place of religion in the political order is arguably the most contentious issue in post-Mubarak Egypt. With Islamist-oriented parties controlling over 70 percent of seats in the new People’s Assembly and the constitution-writing process about to begin, liberals and leftists are apprehensive about the implications for Egyptian law and society, including the rights of…
If you are interested in women’s rights and Islamic law, you have plenty to read. Mostly, you will find descriptions of how Islamic law treats women unequally, often with significant criticism of Islamic law as a whole based on this premise. Sometimes you will find suggestions for how it could be reformed to better honor women’s rights. But it is much…
It is often said that marriage in Islamic law is a civil contract, not a sacrament. If this is so, this means that the marriage contract is largely governed by the same rules as other contracts, such as sale or hire. But at the same time marriage is a profound concern of the Islamic scriptures…
What is Sharia? Sharia literally means “way” or “street.” As an Islamic concept, it means “God’s Way” or “God’s Law” – the divine way that God exhorts everyone to live. The details of that behavior are in scriptural sources (the Quran and documented Prophetic Tradition). The legal rules that a derived from those sources (through…