Lance Laird

25-Laird

Lance Laird

Expert

Areas of Expertise: Medical Anthropology, Religion, culture and healing, Religious health assets, American Muslim identities, Muslim health disparities, Muslim health professionals, Islam and medicine, Refugee and immigrant mental health

Disclaimer: the work linked below reflects the view of the author and does not necessarily reflect the view of ISPU.

Lance D. Laird is Assistant Professor in the Family Medicine Department  and the Graduate Division of Religious Studies at Boston University. He began studying the Islamic tradition as an undergraduate Religious Studies major at The University of Virginia, before combining graduate Christian theological studies in Kentucky and Switzerland for an Master of Divinity degree. After working in interfaith relations with the Presbyterian Church (USA), he completed a Doctor of Theology degree in Comparative Religion at the Harvard Divinity School, with an ethnographic dissertation on Muslim-Christian relations in contemporary Palestinian society under Occupation. Dr. Laird taught comparative religion in interdisciplinary programs at The Evergreen State College (WA), before returning to Boston in 2003. With post-doctoral work in international health and medicine, he has become Assistant Director of the Master’s Program in Medical Anthropology and Cross-Cultural Practice at the Boston University School of Medicine, where he has conducted research projects on diverse intersections of Muslim communities, medicine, public health, alternative healing, civic participation and experiences of discrimination. He helped to form the Greater Boston Muslim Health Initiative to promote mutual education and collaboration between local Muslim and healthcare communities and to provide a safe space for discussion of stigmatized health concerns.

Education

ThD, Harvard Divinity School

Areas of Expertise

  1. Medical Anthropology
  2. Religion, culture and healing
  3. Religious health assets
  4. American Muslim identities
  5. Muslim health disparities
  6. Muslim health professionals
  7. Islam and medicine
  8. Refugee and immigrant mental health

Publications

Muslim community-based health organizations have a history that spans at least two decades in the United States. This study is the first to closely examine how Muslim community-based health organizations (MCBHOs) have developed and are providing free or low-cost primary care services to low-income communities in four cities with large and diverse American-Muslim populations: Chicago,…