Louise Cainkar

12-Cainkar

Louise Cainkar

Expert

Tags: Islamophobia

Areas of Expertise: Muslim American youth, Islamophobia as a form of racism, Arab Americans, The post 9/11 experience for Muslim and Arab Americans

Disclaimer: the work linked below reflects the view of the author and does not necessarily reflect the view of ISPU.

Louise Cainkar is a sociologist and Associate Professor of Social Welfare and Justice at Marquette University, in Milwaukee. She currently serves as President of the Arab American Studies Association and treasurer of the Association for Middle East Women’s Studies. She has published dozens of articles and book chapters on Arab Americans and Muslim Americans. In 2004 she won a Carnegie Scholar Award for her work on the reinvigoration of Islamic practices among second generation Muslim Americans. Her 2009 book, Homeland Insecurity: The Arab American and Muslim American Experience after 9/11 (Russell Sage Foundation) was honored as Outstanding Adult Non-Fiction by the Arab American National Museum. In 2010 she received a “Young Scholar Award” from the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding and a “Scholar of Courage Award” from the Council on American Islamic Relations — Chicago, as well as an award for “Outstanding Contributions to the City of Chicago” for human relations work, presented by Mayor Richard M. Daley. She has also published on the impact of economic sanctions on women and children in Iraq and the forced migration of Palestinians and Jordanians from Kuwait. In addition to academic research and teaching, Cainkar was the founding director of the Palestine Human Rights Information Center and is treasurer of the Arab American Action Network, a Chicago community-based organization. She is currently writing a book on transnational Arab American Muslim teenagers.

Education

PhD

Areas of Expertise

  1. Muslim American youth
  2. Islamophobia as a form of racism
  3. Arab Americans
  4. The post 9/11 experience for Muslim and Arab Americans

Publications

Other Works

In the aftermath of 9/11, many Arab and Muslim Americans came under intense scrutiny by federal and local authorities, as well as their own neighbors, on the chance that they might know, support, or actually be terrorists. As Louise Cainkar observes, even U.S.-born Arabs and Muslims were portrayed as outsiders, an image that was amplified…
Unlike other ascribed and self-described people of color in the United States, Arabs are often hidden under the Caucasian label, if not forgotten altogether. But eleven months after September 11, 2001, the Arab-American is no longer invisible. Whether traveling, driving, working, walking through a neighborhood or sitting in their homes, Arabs in America -- citizens…