Daniel Tutt

38-Tutt

Daniel Tutt

Expert

Areas of Expertise: American Muslims, Islamophobia, Ethics, Interfaith Dialogue, Media, Muslims in the West

Disclaimer: the work linked below reflects the view of the author and does not necessarily reflect the view of ISPU.

Daniel Tutt, Ph.D. is a filmmaker, philosopher and interfaith activist with a focus on anti-Muslim bigotry and interfaith dialogue. His research for ISPU looks at Muslims in America, Islamophobia, and inter-religious dialogue. His writing has been published in Philosophy Now, the Journal of the Society for Contemporary Thought and the Islamicate World, the Washington Post, the Huffington Post and he has essays published in three different books of philosophy. He has presented and lectured at universities such as Georgetown, Duke, American, as well as dozens of national and international conferences. Daniel is an adjunct professor of philosophy at Marymount University and the Director of Programs and Producer at Unity Productions Foundation, a filmmaking and educational organization.

Education

MA, American University; PhD, European Graduate School

Areas of Expertise

  1.  American Muslims
  2. Islamophobia
  3. Ethics
  4. Interfaith Dialogue
  5. Media
  6. Muslims in the West

Publications

Other Works

Scapegoating and race-baiting during a US electoral season are not new; but the irony is that the negative rhetoric surrounding race, Islam and Europe is rising.
On the eve of the 2012 presidential elections, both Islam and Mormonism are becoming increasingly politicized in the public sphere. For President Barack Obama, the myth of his secret Muslim identity is ultimately “coded into political ‘otherness’ – he's a socialist, he's dangerous, maybe a Muslim.” GOP Candidate Mitt Romney’s Mormonism, by contrast, is a…
The debate over Islam and hip hop in Europe is heating up as governments wade in.
It is with a careful understanding of the ambiguity over the war on terrorism that Showtime's new TV series Homeland has been met with such success.
Popular film and television has relied on stereotypical portrayals of Muslims and Arabs since its existence. There is, however, a quiet revolution afoot inside of the entertainment industry, and the predictable box of the “Muslim-as-terrorist” is slowly fading. But will this shift make a difference in ending Americans’ growing prejudice toward Muslims? Neuroscience, a eld…