Muslim American Experience Bibliography

Books Addressing Muslims or Islam in the United States (1966–2016)

For a variety of reasons, Muslims in America are in the public spotlight. As a result, the demand for information and analysis on Muslims and Islam in the United States has risen. At ISPU, we conduct objective, solution-seeking research that empowers American Muslims to develop their community and fully contribute to democracy and pluralism in the United States. It is our hope that these materials will allow a host of interested parties to do the same. In an effort to provide a resource for academics, advocates, journalists, students and others, we created this bibliography of over 250 books published between 1966 and 2016 focused on Muslims and Islam in the United States. We did not include books that focus primarily on Islam and/or Muslims outside of the United States. The bibliography is categorized by subject matter and chronologically with the most recent publications first. The categories include anthropology, biography, health, history, law, political science, reference, and sociology.

This bibliography was co-authored by Sahar F. Aziz, Professor of Law, Texas A&M University School of Law, and Cynthia Burress, Instructional Assistant Professor of Law, Texas A&M University School of Law. If you find any relevant books are not included in this list, we welcome you contact Professor Aziz (saziz@law.tamu.edu) or Professor Burress (cburress@law.tamu.edu) with the citation of your suggested book addition.

Ahmed Afzal, Lone star Muslims: transnational lives and the South Asian experience in Texas (2014)

Summary: “Offers an engaging and insightful look at contemporary Muslim American life in Texas. It illuminates the dynamics of the Pakistani Muslim community in Houston, a city with one of the largest Muslim populations in the south and southwestern United States.  …Decentering dominant framings that flatten understandings of transnational Islam and Muslim Americans, such as ‘terrorist’ on the one hand, and ‘model minority’ on the other, Lone Star Muslims offers a glimpse into a variety of lived experiences.” – New York University Press

Keywords: South Asians

 

Sally Howell, Old Islam in Detroit: rediscovering the Muslim American past (2014)

Summary: “Old Islam in Detroit explores the rise of Detroit’s earliest Muslim communities. It documents the culture wars and doctrinal debates that ensued as these populations confronted Muslim newcomers who did not understand their manner of worship or the American identities they had created. Looking closely at this historical encounter, Old Islam in Detroit provides a new interpretation of the possibilities and limits of Muslim incorporation in American life.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Arabs, Michigan

 

Bayyinah S. Jeffries, A nation can rise no higher than its women: African American Muslim women in the movement for black self determination, 1950-1975 (2014)

Summary: “Challenges traditional notions and interpretations of African American, particularly women who joined the Original Nation of Islam during the Civil Rights-Black Power era. This book is the first major investigation of the subject that engages a wide scope of women from “The Nation” and utilizes a wealth of primary documents and personal interviews to reveal the importance of women in this community.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Anne Rypstat Richards, Muslims and American popular culture (2014)

Summary: “Offering a wide range of information without sacrificing depth, this set examines the ways that Islam and Muslims are depicted in American pop culture. The first volume tackles the entertainment industry, addressing comedy and theater, television, film, popular fiction and poetry, music, and digital culture. The second volume deals with print material and identity in Islam, covering black Muslims, journalism and digital media, societal trends and issues, Islamic-influenced architecture, and memoirs.” – School Library Journal

Keywords: Media

 

Zain Abdullah, Black Mecca: the African Muslims of Harlem (2013)

Summary: “takes us inside the lives of these new immigrants and shows how they deal with being a double minority in a country where both blacks and Muslims are stigmatized. Dealing with this dual identity, Abdullah discovers, is extraordinarily complex. …Abdullah weaves together the stories of these African Muslims to paint a fascinating portrait of a community’s efforts to carve out space for itself in a new country.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Africans; New Immigrants

 

Nahla al Huraibi, Islam, gender and migrant integration: the case of Somali immigrant families (2013)

Summary: “Addresses three questions: how do Somali immigrants negotiate gender notions and practices between those maintained in Somali culture and those adopted from mainstream American culture; how immigrants’ understandings of Islamic writings on gender shape the negotiation process and how the integration process shapes their understanding of Islamic gender discourse; and to what extent resultant gender perceptions and practices reflect the transnational integration and cultural hybridism of two or more cultures.” – LFB Scholarly Publishing

Keywords: Gender; Somalia

 

Yuting Wang, Between Islam and the American Dream: an immigrant Muslim community in Post-9/11 America (2013)

Summary: “Instead of treating Muslim immigrants as fundamentally different from others, this book views Muslims as multidimensional individuals whose identities are defined by a number of basic social attributes, including gender, race, social class, and religiosity. Each person portrayed in this ethnography is a complex individual, whose hierarchy of identities is shaped by particular events and the larger social environment.” – Routledge

Keywords: Civil Rights; Intersectionality

 

Evelyn Alsultany, Arabs and Muslims in the media: race and representation after 9/11 (2012)

Summary: “After 9/11, there was an increase in both the incidence of hate crimes and government policies that targeted Arabs and Muslims and the proliferation of sympathetic portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in the U.S. media. Arabs and Muslims in the Media examines this paradox and investigates the increase of sympathetic images of “the enemy” during the War on Terror.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Anan Ameri, Daily life of Arab Americans in the 21st century (2012)

Summary: “This much-needed study documents positive Arab-American contributions to American life and culture, especially in the last decade, debunking myths and common negative perceptions that were exacerbated by the 9/11 attacks and the War on Terror.” – ABC-CLIO

Keywords: Arab Americans

 

Maleeha Aslam, Gender-based explosions: the nexus between Muslim masculinities, jihadist Islamism and terrorism (2012)

Summary: “Aslam argues that gender is a fundamental battleground on which al Qaeda, the Taliban, and their types must be defeated. Issues of regressive radicalism, literalism, militancy, and terrorism can only be solved through people-centered interventions. Therefore, governments and civil society should promote an alternative culture of growth, self-expression, and actualization for Muslim men.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Gender; Terrorism

 

Hilal Elver, The headscarf controversy: secularism and freedom of religion (2012)

Summary: “An in-depth study of the escalating controversy over the right of Muslim women to wear headscarves. Examining legal and political debates in Turkey, several European countries including France and Germany, and the United States, Elver shows the troubling exclusion of pious Muslim women from the public sphere in the name of secularism, democracy, liberalism, and women’s rights.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Gender; Hijab

 

Nabeel Abraham, Arab Detroit 9/11: life in the terror decade (2011)

Summary: “In Detroit, new realities of political marginalization and empowerment are evolving side by side. As they explore the complex demands of life in the Terror Decade, the contributors to this volume create vivid portraits of a community that has fought back successfully against attempts to deny its national identity and diminish its civil rights.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arabs; Civil Rights; Michigan

 

Leila Ahmed, A quiet revolution: the veil’s resurgence, from the Middle East to America (2011)

Summary: “When she began her study, Ahmed assumed that the veil’s return indicated a backward step for Muslim women worldwide. What she discovered, however, in the stories of British colonial officials, young Muslim feminists, Arab nationalists, pious Islamic daughters, American Muslim immigrants, violent jihadists, and peaceful Islamic activists, confounded her expectations.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Gender; Hijab

 

Reza Aslan, Muslims and Jews in America: commonalities, contentions, and complexities (2011)

Summary: “This book is an exploration of contemporary Jewish-Muslim relations in the United States and the distinct and often creative ways in which these two communities interact with one another in the American context. Each essay discusses a different episode from the recent twentieth and current twenty-first century American milieu that links these two groups together.” – Palgrave MacMillan

Keywords: Interfaith Relations

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Becoming American?: the forging of Arab and Muslim identity in pluralist America (2011)

Summary: “Traces the history of Arab and Muslim immigration into Western society during the 19th and 20th centuries, revealing a two-fold disconnect between the cultures―America’s unwillingness to accept these new communities at home and the activities of radical Islam abroad. Urging America to reconsider its tenets of religious pluralism, Haddad reveals that the public square has more than enough room to accommodate those values and ideals inherent in the moderate Islam flourishing throughout the country.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arab Americans; Identity

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Muslim women in America: the challenge of Islamic identity today (2011)

Summary: “Centering on Muslims in America, the book investigates Muslim attempts to form a new “American” Islam. Such specific issues as dress, marriage, childrearing, conversion, and workplace discrimination are addressed. The authors also look at the ways in which American Muslim women have tried to create new paradigms of Islamic womanhood and are reinterpreting the traditions apart from the males who control the mosque institutions. A final chapter asks whether 9/11 will prove to have been a watershed moment for Muslim women in America.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Gender

 

Chris Heffelfinger, Radical Islam in America: Salafism’s journey from Arabia to the West (2011)

Summary: “Chris Heffelfinger describes the development of the Islamist movement, examines its efforts and influence in the West, and suggests strategies to reduce or eliminate the threat of Islamist terrorism. The book distinguishes Islamism (the fundamentalist political movement based on Islamic identity and values) from the Muslim faith and explores Islamists’ substantial inroads with Muslims and Muslim educational institutions in the West since the 1960s, as well as the larger relationship between Islamist political activism and militancy.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Terrorism

 

Sherman A. Jackson, Islam and the Blackamerican: looking toward the third resurrection (2011)

Summary: “Offers a trenchant examination of the career of Islam among the blacks of America. Jackson notes that no one has offered a convincing explanation of why Islam spread among Blackamericans (a coinage he explains and defends) but not among white Americans or Hispanics. The assumption has been that there is an African connection. In fact, Jackson shows, none of the distinctive features of African Islam appear in the proto-Islamic, black nationalist movements of the early 20th century. Instead, he argues, Islam owes its momentum to the distinctively American phenomenon of “Black Religion,” a God-centered holy protest against anti-black racism.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Junaid Rana, Terrifying Muslims: race and labor in the South Asian diaspora (2011)

Summary: “Highlights how transnational working classes from Pakistan are produced, constructed, and represented in the context of American empire and the recent global War on Terror. Drawing on ethnographic research that compares Pakistan, the Middle East, and the United States before and after 9/11, Junaid Rana combines cultural and material analyses to chronicle the worldviews of Pakistani labor migrants as they become part of a larger global racial system.” – Duke University Press

Keywords: South Asians; Terrorism

 

Kambiz GhaneaBassiri, A history of Islam in America: from the New World to the New World Order (2010)

Summary: “…traces the history of Muslims in the United States and their different waves of immigration and conversion across five centuries, through colonial and antebellum America, through world wars and civil rights struggles, to the contemporary era.” – Cambridge University Press

Keywords: Immigration

 

Jonathan Curiel, Al’ America: travels through America’s Arab and Islamic roots (2009)

Summary: “Curiel demonstrates that many of America’s most celebrated places—including the Alamo in San Antonio, the French Quarter of New Orleans, and the Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina—retain vestiges of Arab and Islamic culture. Likewise, some of America’s most recognizable music—the Delta Blues, the surf sounds of Dick Dale, the rock and psychedelia of Jim Morrison and the Doors—is indebted to Arab music. And some of America’s leading historical figures, from Ralph Waldo Emerson to Elvis Presley, relied on Arab or Muslim culture for intellectual sustenance.” – The New Press

Keywords: Arabs; History

 

Daveed Gartenstein-Ross, Homegrown terrorists in the U.S. and U.K.: an empirical examination of the radicalization process (2009)

Summary: “To date, no study has empirically examined the process through which these terrorists are radicalizing, which constitutes a substantial gap in the literature. This study seeks to address that gap through an empirical examination of 117 homegrown “jihadist” terrorists from the U.S. and U.K.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Terrorism

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Educating the Muslims of America (2009)

Summary: “…considered here are other dimensions of American Islamic education and the ways in which Muslims are rising to the task of educating the American public in the face of increasing hostility and prejudice. This timely volume is the first dedicated entirely to the neglected topic of Islamic education in this country.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Education; Youth

 

Jennifer Leila Holsinger, Residential patterns of Arab Americans: race, ethnicity and spatial assimilation (2009)

Summary: “Holsinger examines the ways that race and ethnicity are manifest in the urban landscape by analyzing the segregation and neighborhood characteristics of Arab Americans. …The advantage experienced by this diverse population relative to non-White racial and ethnic minorities suggests that immigration history, racial status and human capital shape the residential experience of Arab Americans.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arab Americans

 

Hasan Kaplan, Psychology of new Muslim identity in America (2009)

Summary: “Religion appears to be the essential factor influencing the second generation Muslim adolescents’ identity development and their integration into American society. …Very little is known about how they deal with their identity questions and how they more fully integrate or negotiate their multiple allegiances. This study will give you a glimps from the struggle that these young people experience between two conflicting worldviews in order to find their own niche in life.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Identity

 

Liyakat Nathani Takim, Shi’ism in America (2009)

Summary: “Both tracing the early history and illuminating the more recent past with surveys and interviews, Takim explores the experiences of this community. Filling an important scholarly gap, he also demonstrates how living in the West has impelled the Shi’i community to grapple with the ways in which Islamic law may respond to the challenges of modernity.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Islamic Law; Shi’ite

 

Amaney A. Jamal, Race and Arab Americans before and after 9/11: from invisible citizens to visible subjects (2008)

Summary: “Transcending multiculturalist discourses that have simply ‘added on’ the category ‘Arab American’ to the landscape of U.S. racial and ethnic studies after the attacks of September 11th, 2001, this volume locates September 11 as a turning point, rather than a beginning, in Arab Americans’ diverse engagements with ‘race’.” – Syracuse University Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; Civil Rights

 

Akel Ismail Kahera, Deconstructing the American mosque: space, gender and aesthetics (2008)

Summary: “The absence of a single, authoritative model and the plurality of design nuances reflect the heterogeneity of the American Muslim community itself, which embodies a whole spectrum of ethnic origins, traditions, and religious practices ….explores the history and theory of Muslim religious aesthetics in the United States since 1950.” – University of Texas Press

Keywords: Mosques

 

Jamillah Karim, American Muslim women: negotiating race, class, and gender within the ummah (2008)

Summary: “This ethnographic study of African American and South Asian immigrant Muslims in Chicago and Atlanta explores how Islamic ideals of racial harmony and equality create hopeful possibilities in an American society that remains challenged by race and class inequalities. The volume focuses on women who, due to gender inequalities, are sometimes more likely to move outside of their ethnic Muslim spaces and interact with other Muslim ethnic groups in search of gender justice.” – New York University Press

Keywords: African Americans; Gender; South Asians

 

Gary Paul Nabhan, Arab/American: landscape, culture, and cuisine in two great deserts (2008)

Summary: “In an era when some Arabs and Americans have markedly distanced themselves from one another, Nabhan has been prompted to explore their common ground, historically, ecologically, linguistically, and gastronomically. Arab/American is not merely an exploration of his own multicultural roots but also a revelation of the deep cultural linkages between the inhabitants of two of the world’s great desert regions.” – University of Arizona Press

Keywords: Arabs

 

Michael Nash, Islam among urban blacks: Muslims in Newark, New Jersey – a social history (2008)

Summary: “Examines the evolution of Muslim community development in our nation’s third oldest city, Newark, New Jersey. It is an historical account of the efforts of a diverse community that over several decades grappled with the challenge of establishing a respected place for their Islamic lifestyle within the United States of America. Further, it is a story linked closely to the experience of African Americans who have claimed Islam as their religion and struggled to create and to maintain an identity in the social fabric of Newark’s twentieth-century Black religious culture.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; New Jersey

 

Selcuk R. Sirin, Muslim American youth: understanding hyphenated identities through multiple methods (2008)

Summary: “The volume offers a critical conceptual framework to aid in understanding Muslim American identity formation processes, a framework which can also be applied to other groups of marginalized and immigrant youth.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Identity; Youth

 

Stephen Young, Being Muslim in Boston: identity in the Islamic Society of Boston (2008)

Summary: “In this book, the author explores the lives of the Muslims of the Islamic Society of Boston (ISB), a diverse community whose members strive to adapt to the American environment through the embrace of a distinctively Islamic identity. This work examines such subjects as modes of interpretation of Islamic knowledge, attitudes toward religious education for children, marriage within and between ethnic groups, attitudes toward sex and gender, the use of the hijab, and race and ethnic relations, both within and outside the mosque itself.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Boston; Identity

 

Geneive Abdo, Mecca and Main Street: Muslim life in America after 9/11 (2007)

Summary: “Gaining unprecedented access to Muslim communities in America, [Abdo] traveled across the country, visiting schools, mosques, Islamic centers, radio stations, and homes. She reveals a community tired of being judged by American perceptions of Muslims overseas and eager to tell their own stories.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights

 

Arab American National Museum, Telling our story: the Arab American National Museum (2007)

Summary:Telling Our Story is a rich visual and narrative collection celebrating the history, culture, and diversity of the Arab American community. The volume chronicles the founding of the Arab American National Museum from several viewpoints, and offers a detailed tour through its major exhibits.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arab Americans

 

Katherine Bullock, Rethinking Muslim women and the veil: challenging historical & modern stereotypes (2007)

Summary: “This work focuses on the popular Western cultural view that the veil is oppressive for Muslim women and highlights the underlying patterns of power behind this constructed image of the veil.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights; Gender; Hijab

 

Edward E. Curtis, Black Muslim religion in the Nation of Islam, 1960-1975 (2006)

Summary: “Offers the first comprehensive examination of the rituals, ethics, theologies, and religious narratives of the Nation of Islam, showing how the movement combined elements of Afro-Eurasian Islamic traditions with African American traditions to create a new form of Islamic faith.” – University of North Carolina Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Jerald F. Dirks, Muslims in American history: a forgotten legacy (2006)

Summary: “Confronts the prevalent myth that Islam in America is a relatively recent phenomenon. In reality, there is a centuries long history of the Muslim presence in America, which is all too often overlooked or misidentified.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Aminah Beverly McCloud, Transnational Muslims in American society (2006)

Summary: “This in-depth yet accessible guide to Islamic immigrants from the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Africa challenges the widely held perception that Islam is monolithic and exclusively Arab in identity and expression. Offering a topical discussion of Islamic issues, the author argues that there is no one immigrant Islam community but a multifaceted and multi-cultural Islamic world.” – University Press of Florida

Keywords: Africans; South Asians; Transnational

 

Rosina J. Hassoun, Arab Americans in Michigan (2005)

Summary: “Despite their considerable presence, Arab Americans have always been a misunderstood ethnic population in Michigan, even before September 11, 2001 imposed a cloud of suspicion, fear, and uncertainty over their ethnic enclaves and the larger community.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arab-Americans; Michigan

 

Dennis Walker, Islam and the search for African American nationhood: Elijah Muhammed, Louis Farrakhan, and the Nation of Islam (2005)

Summary: “The presence of Islam in America is as long-standing as the arrival of the first captive Muslims from Africa, making Islam one of America’s formative religions. But the long-suppressed indigenous Islam didn’t resurface in organized form until the 1930s, when it infused the politico-spiritual drive by the Noble Drew ‘Ali and the Honorable Elijah Muhammad to address the appalling social conditions of the ghettoized black masses of the North. Elijah Muhammad’s Nation of Islam would prove to be the most extensive, influential and durable of African-American self-generated organizations.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

JoAnn D’Alisera, An imagined geography: Sierra Leonean Muslims in America (2004)

Summary: “Studying Sierra Leonean Muslims living in greater Washington, D.C., [D’Alisera] shows how these immigrants maintain intense and genuine community ties through weddings, rituals, and travel, across both vast urban spaces and national boundaries. D’Alisera examines two primary issues: Sierra Leoneans’ engagement with their homeland, to which they frequently traveled and often sent their children for upbringing until the outbreak of the civil war; and the Sierra Leonean interaction with a diverse, multicultural, increasingly global Muslim community that is undergoing its own search for identity.” – University of Pennsylvania Press

Keywords: Africans; New Immigrants; Sierra Leone

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Not quite American?: the shaping of Arab and Muslim identity in the United States (2004)

Summary: “In this essay Yvonne Haddad explores the history of immigration and integration of Arab Muslims in the United States and their struggle to legitimate their presence in the face of continuing exclusion based on race, nationalist identity, and religion.” – Baylor University Press

Keywords: Arabs; Identity

 

Bruce B. Lawrence, New faiths, old fears: Muslims and other Asian immigrants in American religious life (2004)

Summary: “The fastest-growing religions in America–faster than all Christian groups combined–are Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Sikhism. In this remarkable book, a leading scholar of religion asks how these new faiths have changed or have been changed by the pluralist face of American civil society. How have these new religious minorities been affected by the deep-rooted American ambivalence toward foreign traditions? Bruce Lawrence casts a comparativist eye on the American religious scene and explores the ways in which various groups of Asian immigrants have, and sometimes have not, been integrated into the American polity. ” – Columbia University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; South Asians

 

Iftikhar H. Malik, Islam and modernity: Muslims in Europe and the United States (2004)

Summary: “This is not the first time that conflict has arisen between Muslims in the West and their other communities — this book examines a long history of volatile social relations based on extensive travels and research across four continents. Iftikhar H. Malik offers a wealth of case studies ranging from Muslim Spain and the Ottoman Empire to the present day; from the eruptions of anti-Islamic feeling over the Salman Rushdie affair to the demonization of Islam currently running high on the agenda of the ‘war on terror’.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Terrorism; Transnational

 

Jen’nan Ghazal Read, Culture, class and work among Arab-American women (2004)

Summary: “Read’s findings challenge assumptions about variations in ethnic women’s labor force participation. Arab cultural values play an important role in determining the position of women of Arab descent in American society.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Gender; Intersectionality

 

Garbi Schmidt, Islam in urban America: Sunni Muslims in Chicago (2004)

Summary: “In this detailed study of an immigrant community in Chicago, Garbi Schmidt considers the formation and meaning of an ‘American Islam.’ This vivid portrait of the people and the institutions that draw them together contributes to the academic literature on ethnic and religious identity at the same time as it depicts an immigrant community’s struggle against bias and forces that threaten its cohesion.” – Temple University Press

Keywords: Chicago; New Immigrants

 

Janice Marschner, California’s Arab Americans (2003)

Summary: “Provides sketches of a cross-section of Arab American families in California — both early and later arrivals. The first five chapters summarize geographical, sociological, and historical facts about the Arab world—providing an understanding about why and when immigration occurred. The remaining ten chapters containing the family histories correspond to the typical regional divisions of California” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arab Americans; California

 

Richard Brent Turner, Islam in the African-American experience (2nd ed., 2003)

Summary: “Turner places the study of Islam in the context of the racial, ethical, and political relations that influenced the reception of successive presentations of Islam, including the West African Islam of slaves, the Ahmadiyya Movement from India, the orthodox Sunni practice of later immigrants, and the Nation of Islam. This second edition features a new introduction, which discusses developments since the earlier edition, including Islam in a post-9/11 America.” – Indiana University Press

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Edward E. Curtis, Islam in black America (2002)

Summary: “Examines the origin and development of modern African-American Islamic thought. Curtis notes that intellectual tensions in African-American Islam parallel those of Islam throughout its history—most notably, whether Islam is a religion for a particular group of people or whether it is a religion for all people….Ultimately, Curtis argues, the interplay of particular and universal interpretations of the faith can allow African-American Islam a vision that embraces both a specific group of people and all people.” – SUNY Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Robert Dannin, Black pilgrimage to Islam (2002)

Summary: “Drawing on hundreds of interviews conducted over a period of several years, Dannin provides an unprecedented look inside the fascinating and little understood world of black Muslims. He discovers that the well-known and cult-like Nation of Islam represents only a small part of the picture. Many more African-Americans are drawn to Islamic orthodoxy, with its strict adherence to the Qur’an.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Amina Mohammed-Arif, Salaam America: South Asian Muslims in New York (2002)

Summary: “This study examines the regrouping of the religious community and the reinvention of group identity in first and second-generation immigrants. By transplanting many of their institutions to the US (particularly in New York), Muslim immigrants succeeded in establishing their presence in the American landscape without arousing significant concern in the host community.” – Anthem Press

Keywords: New York; South Asians

 

Museum of the City of New York, A community of many worlds: Arab Americans in New York City (2002)

Summary: “Published in conjunction with an exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York, this collection of 17 essays ranges from the personal to the academic and covers a wide array of topics, such as Arabic poetry, immigration patterns, community formation and the sustaining of cultural traditions.” – Publishers Weekly

Keywords: Arab Americans; New York

 

Richard Wormser, American Islam: growing up Muslim in America (2002)

Summary: “Young Muslims speak out about everyday concerns — family, school, relationships — revealing how they maintain their identity and adapt their religious and cultural traditions to fit into America’s more permissive society. A historical overview of Islam, an interpretation of the basic tenets of the Quran, and a close look at the growth of Islam in African-American communities rounds out the first-person accounts of daily life.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; Youth

 

Asma Gull Hasan, American Muslims: the new generation (2001)

Summary: “Twenty-four-year-old Asma Hassan calls herself a Muslim feminist cowgirl (she was raised in Pueblo, Colorado). Convinced that Muslim Americans are the victims of mistaken identity (our fellow citizens think all Muslims are terrorists and women-oppressors), Hassan breaks through the stereotypes and generalizations to talk about the religion and the believers she knows from the inside.” – Bloomsbury Publishing

Keywords: Youth

 

Nabeel Abraham, Arab Detroit: from margin to mainstream (2000)

Summary: “The volume is divided into six sections – Qualities/Quantities, Work, Religion, Politics, Life Journeys, and Ethnic Futures – each with a cogent introduction by the editors that seeks to draw out larger themes.” – Journal of American Ethnic History

Keywords: Arabs; Michigan

 

Clifton E. Marsh, The lost-found Nation of Islam in America (2000)

Summary: “Sheds light on The Nation of Islam and Minister Louis Farrakhan, from the ideological splits in the Nation of Islam during the 1970s, to the growth and expanding influence in the 1990s.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Garbi Schmidt, American Medina: a study of the Sunni Muslim immigrant communities in Chicago (2000)

Summary: “Schmidt seeks, on basis of two periods of extended fieldwork, to provide a description of some activist strata of these religious communities. The description is framed by the portrayal of a number of Muslim institutions existing within the city and the interpretation of Islam that takes place within them. Accordingly, the book grants us a view of the life and activities of a number of Chicago’s Muslim Sunday Schools, full-time schools, Qur’anic schools, Muslim colleges, students’ associations, major Muslim centers, and “paramosques”, as they appear by the late 1990s.” – Lund University Press

Keywords: Chicago; New Immigrants

 

Sangeeta R. Gupta, Emerging voices: South Asian American women redefine self, family and community (1999)

Summary: “This collection of essays focuses on the experiences of South Asian immigrant women living in North America… The ‘voices’ span different generations of South Asian women, from those who were born in India and moved because of their fathers/husbands, to second generation American-born South Asian girls, being raised in bicultural situations. Similarly, they vary by their religious and regional affiliations. The authors range from feminist scholars who have conducted studies on groups of South Asian women to young graduate students who have presented first-person accounts of their own complex experiences as women of ‘colour’ coming to terms with living on the margins of a dominant culture, and who in their personal lives live with the constant pressure to ’conform to two sets of relational ideals’.” – Indian Journal of Gender Studies

Keywords: Gender; South Asians

 

Sulayman S. Nyang, Islam in the United States of America (1999)

Summary: “Working on the assumption that American Muslims are still unknown to most Americans, the author addresses several issues which are relevant to the whole discussion of religious plurality and multiculturalism in American society. Its contents range from Islam and the American Dream to the birth and development of the Muslim press in the United States.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Multiculturalism

 

Allan D. Austin, African Muslims in antebellum America: transatlantic stories and spiritual struggles (1997)

Summary: “A condensation and updating of his African Muslims in Antebellum America: A Sourcebook (1984), noted scholar of antebellum black writing and history Dr. Allan D. Austin explores, via portraits, documents, maps, and texts, the lives of 50 sub-Saharan non-peasant Muslim Africans caught in the slave trade between 1730 and 1860.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; Africans

 

Kambiz GhaneaBassiri, Competing visions of Islam in the United States: a study of Los Angeles (1997)

Summary: “This book fills a void in the study of Muslims in the United States, presenting the first in-depth study of the large Muslim population in Los Angeles County. It examines an array of issues facing the American Muslim population, ranging from gender and ethnicity to political and da ‘wa (missionary) activities. This study inquires into the role Muslims see for themselves and their religious tradition in the United States and presents the diverse views of Islam held by Muslims in America today.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: California

 

Jack Shaheen, Arab and Muslim stereotyping in American popular culture (1997)

Summary: “concentrates…on the stereotyping of Muslims in the United States, which in many ways has subsumed the original problem of Arab-American stereotyping. To explain to readers why it is important to distinguish between stereotypes and realities, Shaheen submits a series of meticulously footnoted findings concerning the Muslim presence in the world in general and the United States in particular, as well as the Christian Arab presence in both.” – Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

Keywords: Arabs; Media

 

Linda S. Walbridge, Without forgetting the imam: Lebanese Shi’ism in an American community (1997)

Summary: “An ethnographic study of the religious life of the Lebanese Shi’ites of Dearborn, Michigan, the largest Muslim community outside of the Middle East. Based on four years of fieldwork, this book explores how the Lebanese who have emigrated, most in the past three decades, to the United States, have adapted to their new surroundings.” – Wayne State University Press

Keywords: Arabs; Lebanon; Shi’ite

 

Barbara C. Aswad, Family and gender among American Muslims: issues facing Middle Eastern immigrants and their descendants (1996)

Summary: “From the social and historical conditions of the Muslim migration to a range of issues affecting Muslim American life, the contributors provide new and valuable information on topics like intergenerational conflict about identity and values, intermarriage, religious and community involvement, gender and family structure, education, the needs of the elderly, and physical and mental health problems, including AIDS.” – Temple University Press

Keywords: Family; Gender

 

Mattias Gardell, In the name of Elijah Muhammed: Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam (1996)

Summary: “Tells the story of the Nation of Islam—its rise in northern inner-city ghettos during the Great Depression through its decline following the death of Elijah Muhammad in 1975 to its rejuvenation under the leadership of Louis Farrakhan. Mattias Gardell sets this story within the context of African American social history, the legacy of black nationalism, and the long but hidden Islamic presence in North America.” – Duke University Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Ernest McCarus, The development of Arab-American identity (1994)

Summary: “Looks at all aspects–political, religious, and social–of the Arab-American experience.” – University of Michigan Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; Identity

 

Aminah Beverly McCloud, African American Islam (1994)

Summary: “Challenges…myths by contextualizing the experience and history of African American Islamic life. This is the first book to investigate the diverse African American Islamic community on its own terms, in its own language and through its own synthesis of Islamic history and philosophy.” – Routledge

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Al-Hajj Wali Akbar Muhammed, Muslims in Georgia: a chronology and oral history (1994)

Summary: “compiled to serve as a convenient repository of important facts and events related to the presence of Muslims in the United States — more specifically the State of Georgia.” – from the author’s website

Keywords: African-Americans; Georgia

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Mission to America: five Islamic sectarian communities in North America (1993)

Summary: “Islam in the United States has developed a fascinating and diverse range of interpretations. Based in large part on community documents and on interviews and correspondence with community members, this study is the first look at these sectarian movements in the hundred-year history of Muslim religious development in the United States.” – University Press of Florida

Keywords: Sectarian

 

Ron Kelley, Irangeles: Iranians in Los Angeles (1993)

Summary: “This compelling collection of photographs, essays, and interviews explores…the Iranian presence in Southern California. While capturing the remarkable diversity of this immigrant community, Irangeles also confronts the sprawling metropolis that is increasingly influenced by its large ethnic and immigrant populations. Iranians, too, are inexorably linked to the demographic changes in California—changes that raise questions of assimilation and cultural survival—and that will see minority populations become the majority in the next century.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: California; Iran

 

Omar Khalidi, Indian Muslims in North America (1990)

Summary: A collection of articles about the culture of Indian Muslims in North America, derived from the proceedings of a 1989 conference held by the Islamic Society of North America. Includes an extensive bibliography.

Keywords: India; South Asians

 

Martha Lee, The Nation of Islam: an American millenarian movement (1989)

Summary: “Covering the Black Muslim religion, the Nation of Islam, in America since the turn of the 20th century to 1986, this study documents the transformation of the Nation, after the death of Elijah Mohammed, into two quite different entities.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Raymond Brady Williams, Religions of immigrants from India and Pakistan: new threads in the American tapestry (1988)

Summary: “the first comprehensive study of the religious groups formed in the United States by immigrants from India and Pakistan, of the adaptive and organizational patterns developed by these groups, and of their continuing influence on the fabric of American religion and culture. Through analysis of demographic statistics and information gathered in interviews, the book provides an overview of the variety of religions practiced by Indian and Pakistani Americans, the size of these religious groups, and the range of ecumenical, ethnic, sectarian, and national organizations.” – Cambridge University Press

Keywords: India; Pakistan

 

Clifton E. Marsh, From black Muslims to Muslims: the transition from separatism to Islam, 1930-1980 (1984)

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Sameer Y. Abraham, Arabs in the New World: studies on Arab-American communities (1983)

Summary: “Brings together the work of ten social scientists who have studied various aspects of the Arab-American immigrant experience…[includes a] historical profile [and] a micro-view of Detroit’s Arabic-speaking communities.” – Middle East Journal

Keywords: Arabs; New Immigrants

 

Earle H. Waugh, The Muslim community in North America (1983)

Summary: “Fourteen scholars examine what it is like to be a Muslim in North America today-the pressures inherent in an increasingly secular society; the need for people from radically different cultures to work together to maintain their religion; and the struggles of black Muslims to graft an indigenous North American branch onto mainline Islam.” – The University of Alberta Press

Keywords: African-Americans; North America

 

Sameer Y. Abraham, The Arab world and Arab-Americans: understanding a neglected minority (1981)

Keywords: Arabs

 

Viviane Douche-Boulos, Cedars by the Mississippi: Lebanese-Americans in the Twin Cities (1978)

Summary: A history of Lebanese immigrants in Minnesota.

Keywords: Arabs; Lebanon; Minnesota

 

Barbara C. Aswad, Arabic-speaking communities in the United States (1974)

Keywords: Arabs

Sabeeha Rehman, Threading my prayer rug: one woman’s journey from Pakistani Muslim to American Muslim (2016)

Summary: “A richly textured reflection on what it is to be a Muslim in America today. It is also the revealing, always hopeful story of an immigrant’s daily struggles, balancing assimilation with preserving heritage, overcoming religious barriers from within and distortions of Islam from without, and confronting issues of children growing up Muslim.” – Arcade Publishing

Keywords: Gender; South Asian

 

Randy Roberts, Blood brothers: the fatal friendship between Muhammed Ali and Malcolm X (2016)

Summary: “Acclaimed historians Randy Roberts and Johnny Smith reconstruct the worlds that shaped Malcolm and Clay, from the boxing arenas and mosques, to postwar New York and civil rights-era Miami. In an impressively detailed account, they reveal how Malcolm molded Cassius Clay into Muhammad Ali, helping him become an international symbol of black pride and black independence… Blood Brothers is the story of how Ali redefined what it means to be a black athlete in America—after Malcolm first enlightened him.” – Perseus Academic

Keywords: Civil Rights; Nation of Islam

 

Moustafa Bayoumi, This Muslim American life: dispatches from the War on Terror (2015)

Summary: “Reveals what the War on Terror looks like from the vantage point of Muslim Americans, highlighting the profound effect this surveillance  has had on how they live their lives. To be a Muslim American today often means to exist in an absurd space between exotic and dangerous, victim and villain, simply because of the assumptions people carry about you.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Keith Ellison, My country, ’tis of thee: my faith, my family, our future (2014)

Summary: “Filled with anecdotes, statistics, and social commentary, Ellison touches on everything from the Tea Party to Obama, from race to the immigration debate and more. He also draws some very clear distinctions between parties and shows why the deep polarization is unhealthy for America. Deeply patriotic, with My Country, ’Tis of Thee, Ellison strives to help define what it means to be an American today.” – Simon & Schuster

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Ranya Tabari Idliby, Burqas, baseball, and apple pie: being Muslim in America (2014)

Summary: “This is the story of one American Muslim family–the story of how, through their lives, their schools, their friends, and their neighbors, they end up living the challenges, myths, fears, hopes, and dreams of all Americans. They are challenged by both Muslims who speak for them and by Americans who reject them. In this moving memoir, Idliby discusses not only coming to terms with what it means to be Muslim today, but how to raise and teach her children about their heritage and religious legacy.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Identity

 

Najla Said, Looking for Palestine: growing up confused in an Arab-American family (2014)

Summary: “Najla Said grew up in New York City, confused and conflicted about her cultural background and identity. Said knew that her parents identified deeply with their homelands, but growing up in a Manhattan world that was defined largely by class and conformity, she felt unsure about who she was supposed to be, and was often in denial of the differences she sensed between her family and those around her.” – Penguin Books

Keywords: Arabs; Identity; Palestine

 

M. Zuhdi Jasser, A battle for the soul of Islam: an American Muslim patriot’s fight to save his faith (2013)

Summary: “Lays bare the crucial differences between Islam and the spiritual cancer known as Islamism and persuasively calls for radical reformation within the Muslim community in order to preserve liberty for all.” – Simon & Schuster

Keywords: Terrorism

 

Nada Prouty, Uncompromised: the rise, fall, and redemption of an Arab American patriot in the CIA (2011)

Summary: “In the wake of 9/11, at the height of anti-Arab fervor…federal investigators charged Prouty with passing intelligence to Hezbollah. Though the CIA and federal judge eventually exonerated Prouty of all charges, she was dismissed from the agency and stripped of her citizenship. In Uncompromised, Prouty tells her whole story in a bid to restore her name and reputation in the country that she loves.” – MacMillan Publishers

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Masood Farivar, Confessions of a mullah warrior (2010)

Summary: “At a time when the war in Afghanistan is the focus of renewed attention, and its outcome is more crucial than ever to our own security, Farivar draws on his unique experience as a native Afghan, a former mujahideen fighter, and a longtime U.S. resident to provide unprecedented insight into the ongoing collision between Islam and the West.” – Grove Press

Keywords: Afghanistan; Terrorism

 

Asma Gull Hasan, Red, white, and Muslim: my story of belief (2009)

Summary: “The book is directed primarily at non-Muslim Americans to show them Qur’anic texts and Islamic beliefs and practices that challenge unfavorable stereotypes. But Hasan also takes on her fellow Muslims, urging them to distinguish cultural mores from religious orthodoxy, especially concerning the treatment of women.” – Publishers Weekly

Keywords: Gender; Identity

 

Ferial Masry, Running for all the right reasons: a Saudi-born woman’s pursuit of democracy (2008)

Summary: “Chronicles Masry’s remarkable life, from her childhood in Mecca and her decision to immigrate to the U.S. to her career as an educator and her bold entry into the world of politics.” – Syracuse University Press

Keywords: Gender; Saudi Arabia

 

Hassan Qazwini, American crescent: a Muslim cleric on the power of his faith, the struggle against prejudice, and the future of Islam and America (2007)

Summary: “Throughout American Crescent, Qazwini offers a revelatory look at the tenets and history of Islam, defending it as a faith of peace and diversity, and challenging stereotypes and misconceptions promulgated by the media.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights

 

Umar F. Abd-Allah, A Muslim in Victorian America: the life of Alexander Russell Webb (2006)

Summary: “In this first-ever biography of Webb, Umar F. Abd-Allah examines Webb’s life and uses it as a window through which to explore the early history of Islam in America. Except for his adopted faith, every aspect of Webb’s life was, as Abd-Allah shows, quintessentially characteristic of his place and time. It was because he was so typically American that he was able to serve as Islam’s ambassador to America (and vice versa).” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: History

 

Maryam Qudrat Aseel, Torn between two cultures: an Afghan-American woman speaks out (2004)

Summary: “Aseel, a first-generation Afghan American, discusses current events–particularly those relating to Afghanistan–and what it means to be a Muslim in America after 9/11. She combines analysis with unique personal stories describing how her family balances ‘two value systems that have grown to signify polar extremes, those of the East and West.’” – School Library Journal

Keywords: Afghan; Gender

 

Asma Gull Hasan, Why I am a Muslim (2004)

Summary: “”Out of all the cultures in the world… true Islamic values, as embodied in the Qur’an and the life of the Prophet Muhammad, most closely resemble American values.” So asserts Hasan, who has devoted much of her adult life—she is not yet 30—to combating anti-Muslim prejudice. As in her first book, American Muslims, she passionately argues against stereotypes and in favor of an Islam that sounds a lot like Reform Judaism or liberal Christianity. This is the Islam she knew growing up in Pueblo, Colo.—an American girl who looked Chicana and attended a Catholic school.” – Publishers Weekly

Keywords: Arabs; Gender

 

Raymond G. Hanania, I’m glad I look like a terrorist: growing up Arab in America (1996)

Summary: “Explores the experience of one Palestinian Arab American and his life growing up on Chicago’s South Side, his service in the US Military during the Vietnam War, his beginning career in journalism covering Chicago City Hall, and his expansion into politics and media consulting. It explores Arab-Jewish relations in Chicago and the Chicagoland area, and how Arabs were treated in America before Sept. 11, 2001.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights; Youth

Manijeh Daneshpour, Family therapy with Muslims (2016)

Summary: Family Therapy with Muslims is the first guide for mental health professionals who work with Muslims in the family therapy setting. The book opens with a section defining the similarities across Muslim cultures, the effects of postcolonialism on Muslims, and typical Muslim family dynamics. The author then devotes a chapter to different models of family therapy and how they can specifically be applied to working with Muslim families. Case studies throughout the book involve families of many different backgrounds living in the West―including both immigrant and second generation families―that will give professionals concrete tools to work with clients of their own.” – Routledge

Keywords: Family; Mental Health

 

Mona M. Amer, Handbook of Arab American psychology (2015)

Summary: “Contains a comprehensive review of the cutting-edge research related to Arab Americans and offers a critical analysis regarding the methodologies and applications of the scholarly literature. It is a landmark text for both multicultural psychology as well as for Arab American scholarship.” – Routledge

Keywords: Arab Americans; Multiculturalism

 

Sylvia Nassar-McMillan, Biopsychosocial perspectives on Arab Americans: culture, development, and health (2015)

Summary: “Introduces an interdisciplinary lens by bringing together vital research on culture, psychosocial development, and key aspects of health and disease to address a wide range of salient concerns. Its scholarship mirrors the diversity of the Arab American population, exploring ethnic concepts in socio-historical and political contexts before reviewing findings on major health issues, including diabetes, cancer, substance abuse, mental illness, and maternal/child health.” – Springer

Keywords: Arab Americans

 

Sylvia Nassar-McMillan, Counseling & diversity: Arab Americans (2010)

Summary: “This monograph represents a comprehensive primer on counseling issues among Arab American clients” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arab Americans

 

Ahmed Nezar Kobeisy, Counseling American Muslims: understanding the faith and helping the people (2004)

Summary: “Author Kobeisy explains the range of true Muslim faith, shows us how unfair discrimination threatens and scars the mental health of American Muslims, and also demonstrates what counselors, teachers, social workers, and other helping professionals can do to understand the faith as well as help these people recover to live strong in the face of prejudice.” – Praeger

Keywords: Civil Rights; Mental Health

 

Earle H. Waugh, The Islamic tradition: religious beliefs and healthcare decisions (1999)

Summary: Summarizes Islamic beliefs affecting health care in the areas of doctor-patient relations, sexuality and procreation, reproductive health, genetics, transplants, mental health, and end-of-life care.

Keywords: Health

Edward E. Curtis, Muslim Americans in the military: centuries of service (2016)

Summary: “Illuminates the long history of Muslim service members who have defended their country and struggled to practice their faith. Profiling soldiers, marines, airmen, and sailors since the dawn of our country, Curtis showcases the real stories of Muslim Americans, from Omer Otmen, who fought fiercely against German forces during World War I, to Captain Humayun Khan, who gave his life in Iraq in 2004.” – Indiana University Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; History

 

Amir Hussein, Muslims and the making of America (2016)

Summary: “Far from undermining America, Islam and American Muslims have been, and continue to be, important threads in the fabric of American life. Hussain chronicles the history of Islam in America to underscore the valuable cultural influence of Muslims on American life. He then rivets attention on music, sports, and culture as key areas in which Muslims have shaped and transformed American identity. America, Hussain concludes, would not exist as it does today without the essential contributions made by its Muslim citizens.” – Baylor University Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; History

 

Karine V. Walther, Sacred interests: the United States and the Islamic world, 1821-1921 (2015)

Summary: “Excavates the deep history of American Islamophobia, showing how negative perceptions of Islam and Muslims shaped U.S. foreign relations from the Early Republic to the end of World War I. …a vital exploration of the crucial role the United States played in the Islamic world during the long nineteenth century–an interaction that shaped a historical legacy that remains with us today.” – University of North Carolina Press

Keywords: Orientalism; Transnational

 

Hani J. Bawardi, The making of Arab Americans: from Syrian nationalism to U.S. citizenship (2014)

Summary: “Hani Bawardi examines the numerous Arab American political advocacy organizations that thrived before World War I, showing how they influenced Syrian and Arab nationalism. He further offers an in-depth analysis exploring how World War II helped introduce a new Arab American identity as priorities shifted and the quest for assimilation intensified.” – University of Texas Press

Keywords: Arabs; Transnational

 

Denise Spellberg, Thomas Jefferson’s Quran: Islam and the founders (2013)

Summary: “Recounts how a handful of the Founders, Jefferson foremost among them, drew upon Enlightenment ideas about the toleration of Muslims (then deemed the ultimate outsiders in Western society) to fashion out of what had been a purely speculative debate a practical foundation for governance in America. In this way, Muslims, who were not even known to exist in the colonies, became the imaginary outer limit for an unprecedented, uniquely American religious pluralism that would also encompass the actual despised minorities of Jews and Catholics.” – Penguin Random House

Keywords: Multiculturalism

 

Jacob Rama Berman, American Arabesque: Arabs and Islam in the nineteenth century imaginary (2012)

Summary: “Examines representations of Arabs, Islam and the Near East in nineteenth-century American culture, arguing that these representations play a significant role in the development of American national identity over the century, revealing largely unexplored exchanges between these two cultural traditions that will alter how we  understand them today.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Arabs; Orientalism

 

Nathaniel Deutsch, Inventing America’s “worst” family: eugenics, Islam, and the fall and rise of the Tribe of Ishmael (2009)

Summary: “In what becomes a profoundly unsettling counter-history of the United States, Nathaniel Deutsch traces how the Ishmaels, whose patriarch fought in the Revolutionary War, were discovered in the slums of Indianapolis in the 1870s and became a symbol for all that was wrong with the urban poor. The Ishmaels, actually white Christians, were later celebrated in the 1970s as the founders of the country’s first African American Muslim community.” – University of California Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Timothy Marr, The cultural roots of American Islamicism (2006)

Summary: “Analyzes the historical roots of how the Muslim world figured in American prophecy, politics, reform, fiction, art and dress. Marr argues that perceptions of the Muslim world, long viewed not only as both an anti-Christian and despotic threat but also as an exotic other, held a larger place in domestic American concerns than previously thought.” – Cambridge University Press

Keywords: Orientalism; Transnational

 

Gregory Orfalea, The Arab Americans: a history (2005)

Summary: “Orfalea gives a detailed and highly readable account of the three major waves of Arab immigration to America, from 1878 to 1924, 1947 to 1966, and 1967 to the present” – Library Journal

Keywords: Arab Americans; New Immigrants

 

Ami Marvasti, Middle Eastern lives in America (2004)

Summary: “The place of Middle Easterners in the racial hierarchy of the United States remains relatively unexplored in scholarly research. In this book this authors present the everyday experiences of this population by specifically focusing on Arab and Iranian Americans. …Through concrete descriptions and analysis of how Arab and Iranian Americans are confronted with matters of ethnic and racial inequality, this work’s primary aim is to debunk entrenched stereotypes by bringing to the forefront the human complexity of the Middle Eastern experience.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Arabs; Iranian-Americans

 

Elizabeth Boosahda, Arab-American faces and voices: the origins of an immigrant community (2003)

Summary: “Draws on over two hundred personal interviews, as well as photographs and historical documents that are contemporaneous with the first generation of Arab Americans (Syrians, Lebanese, Palestinians), both Christians and Muslims, who immigrated to the  Americas between 1880 and 1915, and their descendants. Boosahda focuses on the Arab-American community in Worcester, Massachusetts, a major northeastern center for Arab immigration, and Worcester’s links to and similarities with Arab-American communities throughout North and South America.” – University of Texas Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; Massachusetts; New Immigrants

 

Robert J. Allison, The crescent obscured: the United States and the Muslim world, 1776-1815 (2000)

Summary: “Focusing on America’s encounter with the Barbary states of North Africa from 1776 to 1815, Robert Allison traces the perceptions and mis-perceptions of Islam in the American mind as the new nation constructed its ideology and system of government.” – University of Chicago Press

Keywords: Orientalism

 

Alixa Naff, Becoming American: the early Arab immigrant experience (1993)

Summary: “Naff focuses on the pre-World War I pioneering generation of Arabic-speaking immigrants, the generation that set the patterns for settlement and assimilation.” – Southern Illinois University Press

Keywords: Arabs; New Immigrants

 

Fuad Shaban, Islam and Arabs in early American thought: roots of Orientalism in America (1990)

Summary: Examines American perceptions of Islam and the Islamic world during the Barbary Wars, as demonstrated in contemporary scholarly writings and popular discourse.

Keywords: Arabs; Orientalism

 

Gregory Orfalea, Before the flames: a quest for the history of Arab Americans (1988)

Summary: “Select Arab American individuals and personalities receive special attention in short vignettes. Yet the book is substantively organized around the analysis of three successive groups of Arab immigration to the United States, all within the last one hundred years.” – Oral History Review

Keywords: Arabs

 

Eric J. Hooglund, Crossing the waters: Arab-speaking immigrants to the United States before 1940 (1987)

Summary: “More than 125,000 Arabs immigrated to the United States between 1890 and 1940. They came largely from villages in what is now Lebanon and Syria. Most of them were adherents of traditional Arab Christian denominations such as Maronite and Melkite rites Catholicism and the Greek Orthodox Church, but there were also small numbers of Arab Muslims. They established ethnic communities in industrial cities throughout the country, and like other immigrants, contributed to the evolution of American culture and society.” – arabamericanhistory.org

Keywords: Arabs; New Immigrants

 

Abdo A. Elkholy, The Arab Moslems in the United States: religion and assimilation (1966)

Summary: “This study was written to explore the variables associated with the differences in the degree of assimilation and religiosity between two Arab-Muslim communities in Toledo, Ohio and Detroit, Michigan, both of whom share identical religio-ethnic backgrounds. In the analysis of the data the author attempts to point out the fallacy of the previously assumed negative correlation between the two factors of religiosity and assimilation.” – Yale University Press

Keywords: Arabs; Michigan; Ohio

Salim Farrar & Ghena Krayem, Accommodating Muslims under common law: a comparative analysis (2016)

Summary: “The book explores the relationship between Muslims, the Common Law and Shariah post-9/11. The book looks at the accommodation of Shariah Law within Western Common Law legal traditions and the role of the judiciary, in particular, in drawing boundaries for secular democratic states with Muslim populations who want resolutions to conflicts that also comply with the dictates of their faith… Acknowledging the inherent pragmatism, flexibility and values of the Common Law, the authors argue that the controversial issue of accommodation of Shariah is not necessarily one that requires the establishment of a separate and parallel legal system.” – Routledge

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Amy Benson, Federal civil rights engagement with America’s Arab and Muslim communities (2015)

Summary: “This book examines the methods, goals and effectiveness of the federal government’s engagement with Arab and Muslim-American individuals and communities. Specifically, the book focuses on actions taken by the federal government to address, prevent and eradicate violations of civil rights laws against the Arab and Muslim-American communities, as well as efforts taken to ameliorate, eliminate or reduce religious, national-origin, and ethnic bias.” – Nova Publishers

Keywords: Civil Rights

 

Malachi D. Crawford, Black Muslims and the law: civil liberties from Elijah Muhammad to Muhammed Ali (2015)

Summary: “Reveals the Nation of Islam’s strategic efforts to engage governmental officials from a position of power, and suggests the federal executive, congressmen, judges, lawyers, law enforcement officials, prison administrators, state governments, and African American civic leaders held a common understanding of what it meant to be and not to be African American and religious in the period between World War II and the Vietnam War.” – Lexington Books

Keywords: African-Americans; Civil Rights; Nation of Islam

 

Khurram Dara, Contracting fear: Islamic law in the Middle East and Middle America (2015)

Summary: “Explains not only the history and origins of Islamic law but also the interesting role it has played in the politics of the Middle East and Middle America. Challenging the conventional wisdom that Islamic law is rigid and permanent, Dara argues that the political and cultural realities of its formation suggest otherwise and should change how Islamic law is thought of and discussed in both the East and the West.” – Cascade Publishers

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Azizah al-Hibri, Islamic jurisprudence: an American Muslim perspective (2014)

Summary: “Provides both the Muslim and non-Muslim reader with a basic understanding of the legal foundations of Islam. It introduces the sources of Islamic law and their significance in the hierarchy of Islamic jurisprudence while presenting Dr. al-Hibri’s articulation of the Islamic worldview, developed in light of modern day concerns, such as those relating to gender, race and class.” – American Bar Association

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Maurits Berger, Applying Sharia in the West: facts, fears and the future of Islamic rules on family relations in the West (2013)

Summary: “Examines in depth how Muslims in the West shape their normative behavior on the basis of Shari’a and how Western societies and legal systems react thereto.” – University of Chicago Press

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Marinos Diamantides, Islam, law and identity  (2012)

Summary: “Addresses broader and over-arching concerns about relationships between religion, human rights, law and modernity. Drawing on a variety of theoretical and empirical approaches, the collection presents law as central to the complex ways in which different Muslim communities and institutions create and re-create their identities around inherently ambiguous symbols of faith.” – Routledge

Keywords: Human Rights; Identity

 

Julie MacFarlane, Islamic divorce in North America: a Shari’a path in a secular society (2012)

Summary: “The most common way North American Muslims relate to shari’a is in their observance of Muslim marriage and divorce rituals; recourse to traditional Islamic marriage and, to a lesser extent, divorce is widespread. Julie Macfarlane has conducted hundreds of interviews with Muslim couples, as well as with religious and community leaders and family conflict professionals. Her book describes how Muslim marriage and divorce processes are used in North America, and what they mean to those who embrace them as a part of their religious and cultural identity.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Family; Islamic Law

 

Mark E. Hanshaw, Muslim and American?: straddling Islamic law and U.S. justice (2010)

Summary: “Explores the often competing demands that confront American Muslims from Islamic religious law and secular law. The conflict extends into many aspects of daily life, ranging from issues concerning divorce and child custody to the interpretation of contracts. …At the heart of Hanshaw’s legal analysis lies the very personal question of whether weaknesses in U.S. judicial processes serve to inhibit the free and full exercise of the Islamic faith.” – LFB Scholarly Publishing

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Kathleen M. Moore, The unfamiliar abode: Islamic law in the United States and Britain (2010)

Summary: “Explores the development of new forms of Islamic law and legal reasoning in the US and Great Britain, as well the Muslims encountering Anglo-American common law and its unfamiliar commitments to pluralism and participation, and to gender, family, and identity. The underlying context is the aftermath of 9/11 and 7/7, the two attacks that arguably recast the way the West views Muslims and Islam.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Tony Gaskew, Policing Muslim American communities: A compendium of post 9/11 interviews (2009)

Summary: “Examines the experiences and social conflicts facing Muslim Americans in the aftermath of September 11, 2001. It provides insight on how the highly politicized and tense atmosphere following the events of 9/11 impacted the relationship between law enforcement agencies and Muslim American communities.” – Edwin Mellen Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Robert F. Cochran, Faith and law: how religious traditions from Calvinism to Islam view American law (2008)

Summary: “Legal scholars from sixteen different religious traditions contend that religious discourse has an important function in the making, practice, and adjudication of American law, not least because our laws rest upon a framework of religious values. The book includes faiths that have traditionally had an impact on American law, as well as new immigrant faiths that are likely to have a growing influence.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Islamic Law; New Immigrants

 

Bill Maurer, Pious property: Islamic mortgages in the United States (2006)

Summary: “the Qur’an forbids the payment of interest, which places conventional home financing out of reach for observant Muslims. To meet the growing Muslim demand for home purchases, a market for home financing that would be halal, or permissible under Islamic law, has emerged. In Pious Property, anthropologist William Maurer profiles the emergence of this new religiously based financial service and explores the ways it reflects the influence of Muslim practices on American economic life and vice versa.” – Russell Sage Foundation

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

California Senate Office of Research, The Patriot Act, other post-9/11 enforcement powers and the impact on California’s Muslim communities (2004)

Summary: “the Senate Office of Research has examined the USA PATRIOT Act and associated federal powers that the government acquired to protect the country against domestic terrorism following the attacks of September 11, 2001. The office has looked at these issues from the perspective of members of Muslim communities in California. A broad cross-section of those communities, we discover, find the force of these new powers to be aimed against Muslims innocent of any connection to terrorist acts or known terrorist intentions.” – from the document’s executive summary

Keywords: California; Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Kathleen M. Moore, al-Mughtaribun: American law and the transformation of Muslim life in the United States (1995)

Summary: “Explores the influence of American law on Muslim life in the United States. It examines pluralism and religious toleration in America, viewed from the vantage point offered by the experiences of Muslims in the United States, a significant and growing part of an increasingly pluralistic society.” – SUNY Press

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Islamic values in the United States: a comparative study (1987)

Summary: “This ethnography of immigrant Muslims considers five Northeastern communities in detail. Including numerous interviews with members of these communities, this investigation provides a highly personal look at what it means to be a believing, practicing Muslim in America at a time when Islam is under the critical scrutiny of international news.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Identity; New Immigrants

Juris Pupcenoks, Western Muslims and conflicts abroad: conflict spillover to diasporas (2015)

Summary: “Based on survey data, statistical datasets, more than sixty interviews with Muslim community leaders and activists, ethnographic research in London and Detroit, and open-source data, this book develops a theoretical explanation for how both differences in government policies and features of migrant-background communities interact to influence the nature of foreign-policy focused activism in migrant communities. Utilizing rigorous, mixed-methods case study analysis, the author comparatively analyses the reactions of the Pakistani community in London and the Arab Muslim community in Detroit to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq during the decade following 9/11. ” – Routledge

Keywords: Terrorism; Transnational

 

Jeffrey L. Thomas, Scapegoating Islam: intolerance, security, and the American Muslim (2015)

Summary: “Exploring the experience of Muslims in America following 9/11, this book assesses how anti-Muslim bias within the U.S. government and the larger society undermines American security and democracy.” – Praeger

Keywords: Civil Rights

 

Edan Ganie, How I became a terrorist: Islamophobia and the oppressive aftermath of 9/11 on the Muslim community (2014)

Summary: “September 11, 2001 was a day that shook the United States to its core. Often when Americans consider the many victims of the attacks, there is one group that few acknowledge as the on-going sufferers of the tragedy; that group is the Muslim community.” – Tate Publishing

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Carl W. Ernst, Islamophobia in America: the anatomy of intolerance (2013)

Summary: “The contributors document the history of anti-Islamic sentiment in American culture, the scope of organized anti-Muslim propaganda, and the institutionalization of this kind of intolerance.” – Palgrave MacMillan

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Robert Booth Fowler, Religion and politics in America: faith, culture, and strategic choices (5th ed., 2013)

Summary: “Incorporating the best and most up-to-date scholarship, the authors assess the politics of Roman Catholics; evangelical, mainline, and African American Protestants; Jews; Muslims and other conventional and not-so-conventional American religious movements. The author team also examines important subjects concerning religion and its relationship to gender, race/ethnicity, and class.” – Westview Press

Keywords: Interfaith Relations

 

Stuart Croft, Securitizing Islam: identity and the search for security (2012)

Summary: “Examines the impact of 9/11 on the lives and perceptions of individuals, focusing on the ways in which identities in Britain have been affected in relation to Islam. ‘Securitization’ describes the processes by which a particular group or issue comes to be seen as a threat, and thus subject to the perceptions and actions which go with national security.” – Cambridge University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Deepa Kumar, Islamophobia and the politics of empire (2012)

Summary: “In response to the events of 9/11, the Bush administration launched a “war on terror” ushering in an era of anti-Muslim racism, or Islamophobia. However, 9/11 did not create Islamophobia, an ideology which has become the handmaiden of imperialism. This book examines the historic relationship between Islamophobia and the agenda of empire-building.” – Haymarket Books

Keywords: Civil Rights; Orientalism

 

Nathan Chapman Lean, The Islamophobia industry: how the right manufactures fear of Muslims (2012)

Summary: “In recent years, Muslim-led terrorist attacks have declined yet anti-Muslim prejudice has soared to new peaks. The fear that the Islamophobia Industry has manufactured is so fierce in its grip on some populations that it drives them to do the unthinkable. This powerful and provocative book explores the dark world of monster making, examining in detail an interconnected, and highly organized cottage industry of fear merchants.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, Moving the mountain: beyond Ground Zero to a new vision of Islam in America (2012)

Summary: “Muslims in America who reject extremist or fundamentalist expressions of Islam at home and abroad feel the urgent need for a voice that can represent them in the current debate about Islam, America, and the West. Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf—the so-called Ground Zero Imam—has become that voice. This is his vision for a new, American Islam.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights; Transnational

 

Alia Malek, Patriot acts: narratives of post-9/11 injustice (2011)

Summary: “tells the stories of men and women who have been needlessly swept up in the War on Terror. In their own words, narrators recount personal experiences of the post-9/11 backlash that have deeply altered their lives and communities.” – McSweeney’s

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Lori A. Peek, Behind the backlash: Muslim Americans after 9/11 (2011)

Summary: “Letting the voices of 140 ordinary Muslim American men and women describe their experiences…presents moving accounts of prejudice and exclusion. Muslims speak of being subjected to harassment before the attacks, and recount the discrimination they encountered afterwards. Peek also explains the struggles of young Muslim adults to solidify their community and define their identity during a time of national crisis.” – Temple University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Irum Shiekh, Detained without cause: Muslims’ stories of detention and deportation in America after 9/11 (2011)

Summary: “Presents the first-person narratives of six Muslim men detained on flimsy or invented charges and ultimately deported after September 11, 2001. Shiekh is methodical about her research methods and explicit about her communication with detainees, who were humiliated, lied to, and abused in prison.” – Publishers Weekly

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Stephen Sheehi, Islamophobia: the ideological campaign against Muslims (2010)

Summary: “Examines the rise of anti-Muslim and anti-Arab sentiments in the West following the end of the Cold War through GW Bush’s War on Terror to the Age of Obama. Using ‘Operation Desert Storm’ as a watershed moment, Stephen Sheehi examines the increased mainstreaming of Muslim-baiting rhetoric and explicitly racist legislation, police surveillance, witch-trials and discriminatory policies towards Muslims in North America and abroad.” – Clarity Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Anny P. Bakalian, Backlash 9/11: Middle Eastern and Muslim Americans respond (2009)

Summary: “This book provides the first comprehensive analysis of the impact of the post-9/11 events on Middle Eastern and Muslim Americans as well as their organized response. Through fieldwork and interviews with community leaders, Anny Bakalian and Mehdi Bozorgmehr show how ethnic organizations mobilized to demonstrate their commitment to the United States while defending their rights and distancing themselves from the terrorists.” – University of California Press

Keywords: Arabs; Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Louise Cainkar, Homeland insecurity: the Arab American and Muslim American experience after 9/11 (2009)

Summary: “[Cainkar] argues that 9/11 did not create anti-Arab and anti-Muslim suspicion; rather, their socially constructed images and social and political exclusion long before these attacks created an environment in which misunderstanding and hostility could thrive and the government could defend its use of profiling. Combining analysis and ethnography, Homeland Insecurity provides an intimate view of what it means to be an Arab or a Muslim in a country set on edge by the worst terrorist attack in its history.” – Russell Sage Foundation

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Jocelyne Cesari, Muslims in the West after 9/11: religion, politics, and law (2009)

Summary: “Based on empirical studies of Muslims in the US and Western Europe, this edited volume posits the situation of Muslim minorities in a broader reflection on the status of liberalism in Western foreign policies. It also explores the changes in immigration policies, multiculturalism and secularism that have been shaped by the new international context of the ‘war on terror’.” – Routledge

Keywords: Civil Rights; Transnationalism

 

Detroit Arab American Study Team, Citizenship and crisis: Arab Detroit after 9/11 (2009)

Summary: “A groundbreaking study of social life, religious practice, cultural values, and political views among Detroit Arabs after 9/11, Citizenship and Crisis argues that contemporary Arab American citizenship and identity have been shaped by the chronic tension between social inclusion and exclusion that has been central to this population’s experience in America.” – Russell Sage Foundation

Keywords: Arabs; Identity; Michigan

 

Steven Salaita, The uncultured wars: Arabs, Muslims, and the poverty of liberal thought (2008)

Summary: “Through twelve stylish essays, Steven Salaita returns again and again to his core themes of anti-Arab racism and Islamophobia and the inadequacy of critical thought among the “chattering classes,” showing how racism continues to exist in the places where we would least expect it. …Salaita explores why Arabs are marginalized, and who seeks to benefit from this.” – University of Chicago Press

Keywords: Arabs; Civil Rights

 

Peter Gottschalk, Islamophobia: making Muslims the enemy (2007)

Summary: “This book shows graphically how political cartoons dramatically reveal Americans’ casual demonizing and demeaning of Muslims and Islam. And the villainizing is shown to be as common among liberals as conservatives. Islamophobia also discusses the misunderstanding of the Muslim world more generally, such as the assumption that Islam is primarily a Middle Eastern religion, whereas the majority of Muslims live in South and Southeast Asia, and the misperception that a significant portion of Muslims are militant fundamentalists, whereas only a small proportion are.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Melody Moezzi, War on error: real stories of American Muslims (2007)

Summary:War on Error brings together the stories of twelve young people, all vastly different but all American, and all Muslim.” – University of Arkansas Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Youth

 

Steven Salaita, Anti-Arab racism in the USA: where it comes from and what it means for politics (2006)

Summary: “Since 9/11 there has been a lot of criticism of America’s involvement in the middle east. Yet there has been little analysis of how America treats citizens of Arab or middle eastern origin within its own borders. Steven Salaita explores the reality of Anti-Arab racism in America. He blends personal narrative, theory and polemics to show how this deep-rooted racism affects everything from legislation to cultural life, shining a light on the consequences of Anti-Arab racism both at home and abroad. ” – Pluto Press

Keywords: Arabs; Civil Rights

 

Michael Welch, Scapegoats of September 11th: hate crimes and state crimes in the war on terror (2006)

Summary: “Drawing on topics such as ethnic profiling, the Abu Ghraib scandal, Guantanamo Bay, and the controversial Patriot Act, Welch looks at the significance of knowledge, language, and emotion in a post-9/11 world. In the face of popular and political cheerleading in the war on terror, this book presents a careful and sober assessment, reminding us that sound counterterrorism policies must rise above, rather than participate in, the propagation of bigotry and victimization.” – Rutgers University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Katherine Bullock, Muslim women activists in North America: speaking for ourselves (2005)

Summary: “In the eyes of many Westerners, Muslim women are hidden behind a veil of negative stereotypes that portray them as either oppressed, subservient wives and daughters or, more recently, as potential terrorists. Yet many Muslim women defy these stereotypes by taking active roles in their families and communities and working to create a more just society. This book introduces eighteen Muslim women activists from the United States and Canada who have worked in fields from social services, to marital counseling, to political advocacy in order to further social justice within the Muslim community and in the greater North American society.” – University of Texas Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Gender

 

Tram Nguyen, We are all suspects now: untold stories from immigrant communities after 9/11 (2005)

Summary: “Tram Nguyen reveals the human cost of the domestic war on terror and examines the impact of post-9/11 policies on people targeted because of immigration status, nationality, and religion. Nguyen’s evocative narrative reporting-about the families, detainees, local leaders, community advocates, and others-is from those living and suffering on the front lines.” – Beacon Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Quintan Wiktorowicz, Radical Islam rising: Muslim extremism in the West (2005)

Summary: “one of the first systematic attempts to explain why Westerners join radical Islamic groups. Quintan Wiktorowicz details the mechanisms that attract potential recruits, the instruments of persuasion that convince them that radical groups represent “real Islam,” and the socialization process that prods them to engage in risky extremism.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Terrorism; Transnational

 

Zahid H. Bukhari, Muslims’ place in the American public square: hopes, fears, and aspirations (2004)

Summary: “Project MAPS (Muslims in the American Public Square) began in 1999 to provide much-needed information on this understudied and immensely diverse group of six million Americans. This first volume emerging from the project, Muslims’ Place in the American Public Square, shows where the American Muslim community fits into the American religious and civic landscape both before and after 9/11.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Identity

 

Aladdin Elaasar, Silent victims: the plight of Arab and Muslim Americans in post 9/11 America (2004)

Summary: “The increasing public’s curiosity about the Arabs, Muslims and the Arab and Muslim Americans in the United States has been unprecedented. This book explains the phenomenon of stereotypes stigmatizing Arabs and Muslims, and how it has affected their lives, a phenomenon that demonized and dehumanized almost two billion people in this world.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights

 

Elaine Catherine Hagopian, Civil rights in peril: the targeting of Arabs and Muslims (2004)

Summary: “Muslims and Arab-Americans are increasingly under attack as a result of the US ‘war on terror’ – at home, as well as abroad. Since the tragic events of September 11, Arab and Muslim Americans have faced a major assault on their civil liberties. While targeting vulnerable groups and drawing on racist stereotypes about Arabs and Muslims, these measures threaten millions of people, including immigrants, activists, trade unionists, academics, writers, and anyone who the government wishes to define as a ‘threat’ to national security.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Nadia Batool Ahmad, Unveiling the real terrorist mind (2002)

Summary:  An interdisciplinary anthology that provides an analytic perspective on the 9/11 cataclysm. This collection of essays, poems, and articles explores issues of terrorism, genocide, race, and war from the view of 66 academics and peace activists from six continents. Contributing authors include Nobel Laureate Betty Williams, NYU law professor Derrick Bell, MIT professor Noam Chomsky, Georgetown professor John Esposito, author Howard Zinn, human rights activist Sara Flounders, former U.S. Congressman Paul Findley, former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark, U.S. Congressional candidate Bob Bowman, and others. 

Keywords: Terrorism

Edward E. Curtis (ed.), The Bloomsbury reader on Islam in the West (2015)

Summary: “Brings together some of the most important, up-to-date scholarly writings published on this subject. The Reader explores not only the presence of Muslim religious practitioners in Europe and the Americas but also the impact of Islamic ideas and Muslims on Western politics, societies, and cultures.” – Bloomsbury Publishing

Keywords: History; Multiculturalism

 

Jane I. Smith, The Oxford handbook of American Islam (2015)

Summary: “covers the growth of Islam in America from the earliest Muslims to set foot on American soil to the current wave of Islamophobia. Topics covered include the development of African American Islam; pre- and post-WWII immigrants; Sunni, Shi`ite, sectarian and Sufi movements in America; the role and status of women, marriage, and family; and the Americanization of Islamic culture. Throughout these chapters the contributors explore the meaning of religious identity in the context of race, ethnicity, gender, and politics, both within the American Islamic community and in relation to international Islam.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: History

 

Juliane Hammer, The Cambridge companion to American Islam (2013)

Summary: “Offers a scholarly overview of the state of research on American Muslims and American Islam. The book presents the reader with a comprehensive discussion of the debates, challenges, and opportunities that American Muslims have faced through centuries of American history.” – Cambridge University Press

Keywords: Bibliography

 

 

Edward E. Curtis, The Columbia sourcebook of Muslims in the United States (2010)

Summary: “Sampling from speeches, interviews, editorials, stories, song lyrics, articles, autobiographies, blogs, and other sources, Curtis creates a patchwork narrative of Muslims from diverse ethnic and class backgrounds, religious orientations, and political affiliations. He begins with a history of Muslims in the United States, featuring the voices of an enslaved African Muslim, a Syrian Muslim sodbuster, a South Asian mystic-musician, and Malcolm X. Then he explores contemporary issues concerning Islam and gender, the involvement of Muslims in American politics, and emerging forms of Islamic spirituality.” – Columbia University Press

Keywords: Culture; History

 

Edward E. Curtis, Encyclopedia of Muslim-American history (2010, 2 volumes)

Summary: “…provides a new and broader, more inclusive approach to American history. Including nearly 300 articles, this two-volume reference book is the first to focus on this critical subject, covering all the historical and contemporary issues, events, people, court cases, themes, and activism relating to Muslim Americans.” – Infobase/Facts on File

Keywords: History; Bibliography

 

American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, Arab American bibliography (2009)

Summary: A non-comprehensive bibliography of books on Arab-Americans and their experiences.

Keywords: Bibliography

 

Edward E. Curtis, Muslims in America: a short history (2009)

Summary: “Muslims are neither new nor foreign to the United States. They have been a vital presence in North America since the 16th century. Muslims in America unearths their history, documenting the lives of African, Middle Eastern, South Asian, European, black, white, Hispanic and other Americans who have been followers of Islam. …Showing how Muslim American men and women participated in each era of U.S. history, the book explores how they have both shaped and have been shaped by larger historical trends.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: History

 

Jane I. Smith, Islam in America (2nd ed. 2009)

Summary: “This richly textured, critically acclaimed portrait of American Muslims introduces the basic tenets of the Muslim faith, surveys the history of Islam in North America, and profiles the lifestyles, religious practices, and worldviews of Muslims in the United States. The volume focuses specifically on the difficulty of living faithfully and adhering to tradition while adapting to an American way of life and addresses the role of women in Muslim culture, the raising and education of children, appropriate dress and behavior, and incidences of prejudice and unfair treatment.” – Columbia University Press

Keywords: History

 

Jocelyne Cesari, Encyclopedia of Islam in the United States (2007)

Summary: “Today, Islam and American Muslim populations are growing in importance in this country, and demand for information about them is high, especially in the aftermath of September 11, 2001. This A-to-Z encyclopedia will help students and other readers get a fast grip on pertinent holidays, terms, beliefs, practices, notables, and sects of the Islamic faith and Muslim practitioners in the United States.” – ABC-CLIO/Greenwood Press

Keywords: Reference

 

George W. Braswell Jr., Islam and America: answers to the 31 most-asked questions (2005)

Summary: “George Braswell is a recognized expert on the religion of Islam and on the Muslim beliefs and practices that Americans need to understand. This book will give readers the information they want and answer the questions they are asking. Beyond the media portrayals, Islam & America accurately reports the truth about this religion and its adherents.” – B&H Publishing

Keywords: Reference

 

Frederick Denny, Muslims in America (2004)

Summary: “From colonial sailors and adventurers to 19th-century peddlers and factory workers to post-World War II immigration, Muslims in America is a sweeping chronicle of Islamic religion and culture in the United States.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Culture; History

 

Karen Isaksen Leonard, Muslims in the United States: the state of research (2003)

Summary: “While many cursory press accounts dealing with Muslims in the United States have been published since 9/11, few people are aware of the wealth of scholarly research already available on the American Islamic population. In Muslims in the United States: The State of Research, Karen Isaksen Leonard mines this rich vein of research to provide a fascinating overview of the history and contemporary situation of American Muslim communities.” – Russell Sage Foundation

Keywords: Bibliography

 

James Beverly, Islamic faith in America (2002)

Summary: “Explores the impact of Muslims on American culture, social issues, and politics and offers a glimpse into the lives of the most important and influential Muslims in this country. Readers will be introduced to the daily lifestyle of Muslims in America, their connections to other Muslims around the world, the influence of Islamic nations on the shape of Muslim life in the United States, and Islam’s role in American history.” – Infobase/Facts on File

Keywords: Reference

 

Mohamed Nimor, The North American Muslim resource guide: Muslim community life in the United States and Canada (2002)

Summary: “In addition to providing an extensive directory of mainstream Muslim community organizations, The North American Muslim Resource Guide offers an overview of Muslim values and institutions, briefly traces the history of Islam in North America, and includes useful tables depicting the growth of the American Muslim population, as well as that of centers, organizations, and ethnic associations serving Islamic communities.” – Routledge

Keywords: Reference

 

Yvonne Hazbeck Haddad, The contemporary Islamic revival: a critical survey and bibliography (1991)

Summary: “This partially annotated bibliography lists available literature on the Islamic revival published in English between 1970 and 1988. Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad and her colleagues also provide background information and a special bibliography on women, Islamic banking, and Muslims in Europe and the United States.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Bibliography

Rosemary Corbett, Making moderate Islam: Sufism, service, and the “Ground Zero mosque” controversy (2016)

Summary: “Refutes the idea that current demands for Muslim moderation have primarily arisen in response to the events of 9/11, or to the violence often depicted in the media as unique to Muslims. Instead, it looks at a century of pressures on religious minorities to conform to dominant American frameworks for race, gender, and political economy… Calls for Muslim moderation in particular are also colored by racist and orientalist stereotypes about the inherent pacifism of Sufis with respect to other groups.” – Stanford University Press

Keywords: Multiculturalism; Terrorism

 

Nahid Afrose Kabir, Muslim Americans: debating the notions of American and un-American (2016)

Summary: “Taking as its point of departure the question of the compatibility of Islam and democracy, this book examines Muslims’ sense of belonging in American society. Based on extensive interview data across seven states in the US, the author explores the question of what it means to be American or un-American amongst Muslims, offering insights into common views of community, culture, and wider society. Through a combination of interviewees’ responses and discourse analysis of print media, Muslim Americans also raises the question of whether media coverage of the issue might itself be considered ‘un-American’.” – Routledge

Keywords: Identity; Media

 

Su’ad Abdul Khabeer, Muslim cool: race, religion, and hip hop in the United States (2016)

Summary: “Muslim Cool is a way of being an American Muslim—displayed in ideas, dress, social activism in the ’hood, and in complex relationships to state power. Constructed through hip hop and the performance of Blackness, Muslim Cool is a way of engaging with the Black American experience by both Black and non-Black young Muslims that challenges racist norms in the U.S. as well as dominant ethnic and religious structures within American Muslim communities. Drawing on over two years of ethnographic research, Su’ad Abdul Khabeer illuminates the ways in which young and multiethnic U.S. Muslims draw on Blackness to construct their identities as Muslims.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Media; Youth

 

Sunaina Marr Maira, The 9/11 generation: youth, rights and solidarity in the War on Terror (2016)

Summary: “Uses extensive ethnography to understand the meaning of political subjecthood and mobilization for Arab, South Asian, and Afghan American youth. Maira explores how young people from communities targeted in the War on Terror engage with the “political,” forging coalitions based on new racial and ethnic categories, even while they are under constant scrutiny and surveillance, and organizing around notions of civil rights and human rights.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Terrorism; Youth

 

Christopher A. Bail, Terrified: how anti-Muslim fringe organizations became mainstream (2015)

Summary: “Drawing on cultural sociology, social network theory, and social psychology, [Bail] shows how anti-Muslim organizations gained visibility in the public sphere, commandeered a sense of legitimacy, and redefined the contours of contemporary debate, shifting it ever outward toward the fringe. Bail illustrates his pioneering theoretical argument through a big-data analysis of more than one hundred organizations struggling to shape public discourse about Islam.” – Princeton University Press

Keywords: Media

 

Patrick D. Bowen, A history of conversion to Islam in the United States, volume 1: white American Muslims before 1975 (2015)

Summary: “The first in-depth study of the thousands of white Americans who embraced Islam between 1800 and 1975. Drawing from little-known archives, interviews, and rare books and periodicals, Patrick D. Bowen unravels the complex social and religious factors that led to the emergence of a wide variety of American Muslim and Sufi conversion movements.” – Brill

Keywords: Converts; History

 

Fawzia Reza, The effects of the September 11th terrorist attack on Pakistani-American parental involvement in U.S. schools (2015)

Summary: “Examines the challenges that Pakistani-American families have faced in their attempts to assimilate within the U.S. school culture since the September eleventh terrorist attack. Negative stereotyping has permeated into schools, and affected Pakistani-American students and their families. Reza examines this phenomenon from a parental lens in order to describe how 9/11 has altered the involvement of Pakistani-American parents in their children’s schools, and whether or not schools are appropriately addressing these issues and concerns.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Education; Youth

 

 

Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na’im, What is an American Muslim?: embracing faith and citizenship (2014)

Summary: “Muslims, An-Na’im argues, must embrace the full range of rights and responsibilities that come with American citizenship, and participate fully in civic life, while at the same time asserting their right to define their faith for themselves. They must view themselves, simply, as American citizens who happen to be Muslims.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Identity

 

Andrew Garrod, Growing up Muslim: Muslim college students in America tell their life stories (2014)

Summary: “Present[s] fourteen personal essays by college students of the Muslim faith who are themselves immigrants or are the children of immigrants to the United States. In their essays, the students grapple with matters of ethnicity, religious prejudice and misunderstanding, and what is termed Islamophobia. The fact of 9/11 and subsequent surveillance and suspicion of Islamic Americans (particularly those hailing from the Middle East and the Asian Subcontinent) have had a profound effect on these students, their families, and their communities of origin.” – Cornell University Press

Keywords: Education; Youth

 

Ayesha Mattu, Salaam, love: American Muslim men on love, sex, and intimacy (2014)

Summary: “Ayesha Mattu and Nura Maznavi provide a space for American Muslim men to speak openly about their romantic lives, offering frank, funny, and insightful glimpses into their hearts—and bedrooms. The twenty-two writers come from a broad spectrum of ethnic, racial, and religious perspectives—including orthodox, cultural, and secular Muslims—reflecting the strength and diversity of their faith community and of America.” – Beacon Press

Keywords: Gender; Sex

 

Dawn-Marie Gibson, Women of the Nation: between black protest and Sunni Islam (2014)

Summary: “Draws on oral histories and interviews with approximately 100 women across several cities to provide an overview of women’s historical contributions and their varied experiences of the NOI, including both its continuing community under Farrakhan and its offshoot into Sunni Islam under Imam W.D. Mohammed. The authors examine how women have interpreted and navigated the NOI’s gender ideologies and practices, illuminating the experiences of African-American, Latina, and Native American women within the NOI and their changing roles within this patriarchal movement.” – New York University Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Women

 

Liz Jackson, Muslims and Islam in U. S. education: reconsidering multiculturalism (2014)

Summary: “Explores the complex interface that exists between U.S. school curriculum, teaching practice about religion in public schools, societal and teacher attitudes toward Islam and Muslims, and multiculturalism as a framework for meeting the needs of minority group students. It presents multiculturalism as a concept that needs to be rethought and reformulated in the interest of creating a more democratic, inclusive, and informed society.” – Routledge

Keywords: Education; Multiculturalism; Youth

 

Nahid Afrose Kabir, Young American Muslims: dynamics of identity (2014)

Summary: “presents a journey into the ideas, outlooks and identity of young Muslims in America today. Based on around 400 in-depth interviews with young Muslims from Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York and Virginia, all the richness and nuance of these minority voices can be heard.” – Edinburgh University Press

Keywords: Youth

 

Shabana Mir, Muslim American women on campus: undergraduate social life and identity (2014)

Summary: “Illuminates the processes by which a group of ethnically diverse American college women, all identifying as Muslim and all raised in the United States, construct their identities during one of the most formative times in their lives. …Focuses on key leisure practices–drinking, dating, and fashion–to probe how Muslim American students adapt to campus life and build social networks that are seamlessly American, Muslim, and youthful.” – University of North Carolina Press

Keywords: Education; Women; Youth

 

Samina Yasmeen, Muslim citizens in the West: spaces and agents of inclusion and exclusion (2014)

Summary: “Drawing upon original case studies spanning North America, Europe and Australia, Muslim Citizens in the West explores how Muslims have been both the excluded and the excluders within the wider societies in which they live. …The cases examined show how these tendencies span geographical, ethnic and gender divides and can be encouraged by a combination of international and national developments prompting some groups to identify wider society as the ‘other’.” – Routledge

Keywords: Gender; Identity; Transnational

 

Mucahit Bilici, Finding Mecca in America: how Islam is becoming an American religion (2013)

Summary: “Traces American Muslims’ progress from outsiders to natives and from immigrants to citizens. …develops a novel sociological approach and offers insights into the civil rights activities of Muslim Americans, their increasing efforts at interfaith dialogue, and the recent phenomenon of Muslim ethnic comedy.” – University of Chicago Press

Keywords: Interfaith Relations; New Immigrants

 

Zareena Grewal, Islam is a foreign country: American Muslims and the global crisis of authority (2013)

Summary: “By examining the tension between American Muslims’ ambivalence toward the American mainstream and their desire to enter it, Grewal puts contemporary debates about Islam in the context of a long history of American racial and religious exclusions. Probing the competing obligations of American Muslims to the nation and to the umma (the global community of Muslim believers), Islam is a Foreign Country investigates the meaning of American citizenship and the place of Islam in a global age.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Transnational; Youth

 

Scott Korb, Light without fire: the making of America’s first Muslim college (2013)

Summary: “Tells the story of [Zaytuna College’s] founders, Sheikh Hamza Yusuf and Imam Zaid Shakir, arguably the two most influential leaders in American Islam, ‘rock stars’ who, tellingly, are little known outside their community. Korb also introduces us to Zaytuna’s students, young American Muslims of all stripes who admire—indeed, love—their teachers in ways college students typically don’t and whose stories, told for the first time, signal the future of Islam in this country.” – Beacon Press

Keywords: Education; Youth

 

Samory Rasheed, Black Muslims in the U.S.: history, politics, and the struggle of a community (2013)

Summary: “Seeks to address deficiencies in current scholarship about black Muslims in American society, from examining the origins of Islam among African-Americans to acknowledging the influential role that black Muslims play in contemporary U.S. society.” – Palgrave MacMillan

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Wajahat Ali, All-American: 45 American men on being Muslim (2012)

Summary: “A unique collection of stories shattering the misconceptions surrounding American Muslim men through honest, accessible, personal essays.” – White Cloud Press

Keywords: Gender; Identity

 

Juliane Hammer, American Muslim women, religious authority, and activism: more than a prayer (2012)

Summary: “Hammer looks at the work of significant female American Muslim writers, scholars, and activists, using their writings as a lens for a larger discussion of Muslim intellectual production in America and beyond. Centered on the controversial women-led Friday prayer in March 2005, Hammer uses this event and its aftermath to address themes of faith, community, and public opinion.” – University of Texas Press

Keywords: Gender

 

Mustafa Khattab, The Nation of Islam: the history, ideology and development of the Black Muslim movement in America (2012)

Summary: “Explores the origins of the NOI ideology and its impact on other Muslim and black nationalist groups in the US. This book, probably the first scholarly work ever on the NOI by an Arab-Muslim from a prestigious institution of higher learning such as Al-Azhar University, is instrumental in understanding the history, future, and progress of Islam in America & the African-American community.” – Lambert Academic Publishing

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Ayesha Mattu, Love, InshAllah: the secret love lives of American Muslim women (2012)

Summary: “25 American Muslim writers sweep aside stereotypes to share their search for love openly for the first time, showing just how varied the search for love can be–from singles’ events and online dating, to college flirtations and arranged marriages, all with a uniquely Muslim twist.” – Soft Skull Press

Keywords: Gender; Sex

 

Nadine Christine Naber, Arab America: gender, cultural politics, and activism (2012)

Summary: “Tells the stories of second generation Arab American young adults living in the San Francisco Bay Area, most of whom are political activists engaged in two culturalist movements that draw on the conditions of diaspora, a Muslim global justice and a Leftist Arab movement. Writing from a transnational feminist perspective, Naber reveals the complex and at times contradictory cultural and political processes through which Arabness is forged in the contemporary United States.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; Gender; Youth

 

Maria M. Ebrahimji, I speak for myself: American women on being Muslim (2011)

Summary: “40 American women under the age of 40 share their experiences of their lives as Muslim women in America. While their commonality is faith and citizenship, their voices and their messages are very different. …Each personal story is a contribution to the larger narrative of life stories and life work of a new generation of Muslim women.” – White Cloud Press

Keywords: Gender

 

Anouar Majid, Islam and America: building a future without prejudice (2011)

Summary: “Majid, born in Morocco, raised a Muslim, educated in the U.S., and now an American, offers a personal view of the tensions between the U.S. and Islam and the foundation for moving forward. He begins, and ends, with the revolutionary idea that embodies the U.S.: the promise of liberty, free inquiry, new ideas, and a democratic spirit and the hope it engenders. In between, he argues that both sides have used sacred scriptures and unexamined religious beliefs to justify social injustice, misguided foreign-policy choices, and acts of aggression.” – Booklist

Keywords: Biography

 

Peter Morey, Framing Muslims: stereotyping and representation after 9/11 (2011)

Summary: “Dissect[s] the ways in which stereotypes depicting Muslims as an inherently problematic presence in the West are constructed, deployed, and circulated in the public imagination, producing an immense gulf between representation and a considerably more complex reality. Crucially, they show that these stereotypes are not solely the province of crude-minded demagogues and their tabloid megaphones, but multiply as well from the lips of supposedly progressive elites, even those who presume to speak “from within,” on Muslims’ behalf.” – Harvard University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Samir Abu-Absi, Arab Americans in Toledo (2010)

Summary: “Toledo’s Arab American experience is a great American story of an ethnic community finding fertile soil, sinking roots and flourishing. This has been the story of ethnic groups whose American experience predates that of Arab Americans and it is being written anew by more recent immigrant communities.” – University of Toledo Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; Ohio

 

Akbar Ahmed, Journey into America: the challenge of Islam (2010)

Summary: “To shed light on this increasingly important religious group and counter mutual distrust, renowned scholar Akbar Ahmed conducted the most comprehensive study to date of the American Muslim community. Journey into America explores and documents how Muslims are fitting into U.S. society, placing their experience within the larger context of American identity. This eye-opening book also offers a fresh and insightful perspective on American history and society.” – Brookings Institution Press

Keywords: Identity; Mosques

 

Stephan Salisbury, Mohamed’s ghosts: an American story of love and fear in the homeland (2010)

Summary: “As he explores events centered on what he calls “the poor streets of Frankford Valley” in Philadelphia, or the empty streets of Brooklyn , or the fear-encrusted precincts of Lodi, California and beyond, Salisbury is constantly reminded of similar incidents in his own past–the paranoia and police activity that surrounded his political involvement in the 1960s, and the surveillance and informing that dogged his father, a well-known New York Times reporter and editor, for half a century.” – Public Affairs Books

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Linda Brandi Cateura, Voices of American Muslims: 23 profiles (2009)

Summary: “American Muslims from all walks of life introduce themselves and the many faces of Islam in America. These individuals include the head of New York’s largest mosque, an actress, a cabdriver and many others. These first-person narratives, drawn from personal interviews conducted by the author, are frank and offer insights rarely experienced in most Americans’ relations with their Muslim neighbours.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Identity

 

Sarah M.A. Gualtieri, Between Arab and white: race and ethnicity in the early Syrian American diaspora (2009)

Summary: “presents an original analysis of the ways in which people mainly from current day Lebanon and Syria—the largest group of Arabic-speaking immigrants before World War II—came to view themselves in racial terms and position themselves within racial hierarchies as part of a broader process of ethnic identity formation.” – University of California Press

Keywords: Arabs; New Immigrants; Syria

 

Hamid Reza Kusha, Islam in American prisons: black Muslims’ challenge to American penology (2009)

Summary: “The growth of Islam both worldwide and particularly in the United States is especially notable among African-American inmates incarcerated in American state and federal penitentiaries. …This new study examines this multifaceted phenomenon and makes a powerful argument for the objective examination of the rehabilitative potentials of faith-based organizations in prisons, including the faith of those who convert to Islam.” – Routledge

Keywords: Prisons

 

Sunaina Marr Maira, Missing: youth, citizenship, and empire after 9/11 (2009)

Summary: “Drawing on ethnographic research in a New England high school, Maira investigates the cultural dimensions of citizenship for South Asian Muslim students and their relationship to the state in the everyday contexts of education, labor, leisure, dissent, betrayal, and loss. The narratives of the mostly working-class youth she focuses on demonstrate how cultural citizenship is produced in school, at home, at work, and in popular culture.” – Duke University Press

Keywords: Education; South Asians; Youth

 

Alia Malek, A country called Amreeka: Arab roots, American stories (2009)

Summary: “The history of Arab settlement in the United States stretches back nearly as far as the history of America itself. For the first time, Alia Malek brings this history to life. In each of eleven spellbinding chapters, she inhabits the voice and life of one Arab American, at one time-stopping historical moment.” – Simon & Schuster

Keywords: Arab Americans

 

Manning Marable, Black routes to Islam (2009)

Summary: “Starting with the 19th century narratives of African American travelers to the Holy Land, the following chapters probe Islam’s role in urban social movements, music and popular culture, gender dynamics, relations between African Americans and Muslim immigrants, and the racial politics of American Islam with the ongoing war in Iraq.” – Palgrave MacMillan

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Zarinah El-Amin Naeem, Jihad of the soul: singlehood and the search for love in Muslim America (2009)

Summary: “An anthropological exploration into the attitudes, experiences and emotions of single Muslim young adults between the ages of 18-40.” – Western Michigan University Press

Keywords: Identity; Youth

 

Christopher M. Stonebanks, Muslim voices in school: narratives of identity and pluralism (2009)

Summary: “The politics and education about Islam, Muslims, Arabs, Turks, Iranians and all that is associated with the West’s popular imagination of the monolithic ‘Middle-East’ has long been framed within problematics. The goal of this book is to push back against the reductive mainstream narratives told about Muslim and Middle Eastern heritage students for generations if not centuries, in mainstream schools. The chapters are each authored by Muslim-acculturated scholars.” – Sense Publishers

Keywords: Education; Youth

 

John Tehranian, Whitewashed: America’s invisible Middle Eastern minority (2009)

Summary: “Unlike many other racial minorities in our country, Middle Eastern Americans have faced rising, rather than diminishing, degrees of discrimination over time; a fact highlighted by recent targeted immigration policies, racial profiling, a war on terrorism with a decided racialist bent, and growing rates of job discrimination and hate crime. Oddly enough, however, Middle Eastern Americans are not even considered a minority in official government data. Instead, they are deemed white by law….Tehranian combines his own personal experiences as an Iranian American with an expert’s analysis of current events, legal trends, and critical theory to analyze this bizarre Catch-22 of Middle Eastern racial classification.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Arabs; Civil Rights

 

Nader Ayish, Stereotypes and Arab American Muslim high school students (2008)

Summary: “In an effort to better understand this diverse community, this study investigated how five Arab American Muslim high school students perceive and cope with stereotypes and the way their culture and religion is portrayed in film, the media, popular culture, and school curricula.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arabs; Education; Youth

 

Moustafa Bayoumi, How does it feel to be a problem?: being young and Arab in America (2008)

Summary: “Bayoumi takes readers into the lives of seven twenty-somethings living in Brooklyn, home to the largest Arab-American population in the United States. He moves beyond stereotypes and clichés to reveal their often unseen struggles, from being subjected to government surveillance to the indignities of workplace discrimination.” – Penguin Random House

Keywords: Arabs; Civil Rights

 

Katherine Pratt Ewing, Being and belonging: Muslims in the United States since 9/11 (2008)

Summary: “Katherine Pratt Ewing leads a group of anthropologists, sociologists, and cultural studies experts in exploring how the events of September 11th have affected the quest for belonging and identity among Muslims in America—for better and for worse. From Chicago to Detroit to San Francisco, Being and Belonging takes readers on an extensive tour of Muslim America—inside mosques, through high school hallways, and along inner city streets.” – Russell Sage Foundation

Keywords: Civil Rights

 

Dalel B. Khalil, From veils to thongs: an Arab chick’s survival guide to balancing one’s ethnic identity in America (2008)

Summary: “One who is both Arab and American is very often, very confused. Her one foot is planted firmly in a traditional world whose cultural rules haven’t changed in over 2,000 years. Her other foot is skidding on a thin piece of ice, the mega-liberal free-for-all, called America. And she is trying to balance walking on both. This hilarious, lighthearted survival guide explains how to retain one’s sanity in the battle of the ultimate culture clash.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Gender; Identity

 

Anjana Narayna, Living our religions: Hindu and Muslim South Asian-American women narrate their experiences (2008)

Summary:Living Our Religions sheds important light on the lives of Hindu and Muslim American women of South Asian origin. As the authors reveal their diverse and culturally dynamic religious practices, describe the race, gender, and ethnic boundaries that they encounter, and document how they resist and challenge these boundaries, they cut through the myths and ethnocentrism of popular portrayals to reveal the vibrancy, courage, and agency of an “invisible” minority.” – Lynne Rienner Publishers

Keywords: Gender; South Asians

 

Paul M. Barrett, American Islam: the struggle for the soul of a religion (2007)

Summary: “Barrett tells seven stories of American Muslims in all their stereotype-defying complexity.” – Palgrave MacMillan

Keywords: Identity; Media

 

Brigitte L. Nacos, Fueling our fears: stereotyping, media coverage, and public opinion of Muslim Americans (2007)

Summary: “After September 11, many in the American public and media zeroed in on Muslims in America and the world, irresponsibly linking―intentionally or not―Muslims at large with terrorism. This well-researched book explores this focus and its implications. At the same time, the authors do not leave out the opinion of Muslim Americans, exploring their views about the American media and its influence, their attitudes toward non-Muslim Americans and, just as important, their opinions on post–9/11 U.S. counterterrorist policies and practices.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Media; Terrorism

 

Anna Mansson McGinty, Becoming Muslim: Western women’s conversions to Islam (2006)

Summary: “While Islam has become a controversial topic in the West, a growing number of Westerners find powerful meaning in Islam. Becoming Muslim is an ethnographic study based on in-depth interviews with Swedish and American women who have converted to Islam.” – Palgrave MacMillan

Keywords: Converts; Gender

 

Asra Q. Nomani, Standing alone: an American woman’s struggle for the soul of Islam (2006)

Summary: “Nomani shows how many of the freedoms enjoyed centuries ago have been erased by the conservative brand of Islam practiced today, giving the West a false image of Muslim women as veiled and isolated from the world.” – HarperCollins

Keywords: Gender

 

Karin van Nieuwkerk, Women embracing Islam: gender and conversion in the West (2006)

Summary: “In this vanguard study of gender and conversion to Islam, leading historians, sociologists, anthropologists, and theologians investigate why non-Muslim women in the United States, several European countries, and South Africa are converting to Islam. Drawing on extensive interviews with female converts, the authors explore the life experiences that lead Western women to adopt Islam, as well as the appeal that various forms of Islam, as well as the Nation of Islam, have for women.” – University of Texas Press

Keywords: Converts; Gender

 

Donna Gehrke White, The face behind the veil: the extraordinary lives of Muslim women in America (2006)

Summary: “Provides a rare, revealing look into the hearts, minds, and everyday lives of Muslim women in America and opens a window on a culture as diverse as it is misunderstood.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Gender; Hijab

 

Saleemah Abdul-Ghafur, Living Islam out loud: American Muslim women speak (2005)

Summary: “Living Islam Out Loud presents the first generation of American Muslim women who have always identified as both American and Muslim. These pioneers have forged new identities for themselves and for future generations, and they speak out about the hijab, relationships, sex and sexuality, activism, spirituality, and much more.” – Beacon Press

Keywords: Gender; Identity

 

Fawzia Afzal-Khan, Shattering the stereotypes: Muslim women speak out (2005)

Summary: “In this ambitious volume that includes essays, poetry, fiction, memoir, plays, and artwork, Muslim women speak for themselves, revealing a complexity of experience and thought that escapes most Western portrayals. Islam is, as editor Fawzia Afzal-Khan puts it, only “one spoke in the wheel of our lives.”” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Culture; Gender; Identity

 

Loukia K. Sarroub, All American Yemeni girls: being Muslim in a public school (2005)

Summary: “Based on more than two years of fieldwork conducted in a Yemeni community in southeastern Michigan, this unique study examines Yemeni American girls’ attempts to construct and make sense of their identities as Yemenis, Muslims, Americans, daughters of immigrants, teenagers, and high school students.” – University of Pennsylvania Press

Keywords: Gender; Identity; Yemen; Youth

 

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Muslims in the United States: identity, influence, innovation (2005)

Summary: Proceedings of conferences sponsored by the Division of U.S. Studies, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, in 2003 and 2005. Topics include issues affecting Muslims in the United States; the impact American Muslims are having around the world; and pluralism and gender in Islam.

Keywords: Identity

 

Mbaye Lo, Muslims in America: race, politics, and community building (2004)

Summary: “Mabye takes the mosque as his paradigm to analyze and synthesize the growth of Muslim communities in Cleveland; how their mosques developed over time, the challenges they faced, in moving to mainstream Islam and developing a multi-ethnic community.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Mosques; Ohio

 

Mahmood Mamdani, Good Muslim, bad Muslim: America, the Cold War, and the roots of terror (2004)

Summary: “Distinguished political scientist and anthropologist Mahmood Mamdani brings his expertise and insight to bear on a question many Americans have been asking since 9/11: how did this happen?” – Penguin Random House

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Carolyn Moxley Rouse, Engaged surrender: African American women and Islam (2004)

Summary: “In Engaged Surrender, Islam becomes a unique prism for clarifying the role of faith in contemporary black women’s experience. Through these women’s stories, Rouse reveals how commitment to Islam refracts complex processes—urbanization, political and social radicalization, and deindustrialization—that shape black lives generally, and black women’s lives in particular. Rather than focusing on traditional (and deeply male) ideas of autonomy and supremacy, the book—and the community of women it depicts—emphasizes more holistic notions of collective obligation, personal humility, and commitment to overarching codes of conduct and belief.” – University of California Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Gender

 

Michael Wolfe, Taking back Islam: American Muslims reclaim their faith (2003)

Summary: “Noted Islamic authority Michael Wolfe moderates 35 expert speakers, writers and leaders, including Yusuf Islam (Cat Stevens) and Karen Armstrong. They discuss the future of Islam, tear down false stereotypes, review the historical realities that have shaped the religion, and examine paradoxes and schisms within the faith.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Interfaith Relations; Media

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Muslim minorities in the West: visible and invisible (2002)

Summary: “noted scholars Haddad and Smith bring together outstanding essays on the distinct experiences of minority Muslim communities from Detroit, Michigan to Perth, Australia and the wide range of issues facing them. Haddad and Smith in their introduction trace the broad contours of the Muslim experience in Europe, America and other areas of European settlement and shed light on the common questions minority Muslims face of assimilation, discrimination, evangelism, and politics.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Arabs; Identity

 

Muqteda Khan, American Muslims: bridging faith and freedom (2002)

Summary: A collection of essays on a range of topics related to American Muslims.

 

Anan Ameri, Arab Americans in metro Detroit: a pictorial history (2001)

Summary: “Through more than 180 images, this book portrays the challenges and triumphs of Arabs as they preserve their families, and build churches, mosques, restaurants, businesses, and institutions, thus contributing to Detroit’s efforts in regaining its position as a world class city.” – Arcadia Publishing

Keywords: Arabs; Michigan

 

Ihsan Bagby, The mosque in America: a national portrait (2001)

Summary: “This report presents findings from the Mosque Study Project 2000, the largest, most comprehensive survey of mosques ever to be conducted in the United States. The purpose of the Study is twofold: to provide a comprehensive, detailed portrait of mosques, which can be subsequently used by mosque leaders and Muslim scholars to envision ways to strengthen mosques. Secondly the Study provides a public profile of mosques that will hopefully further the understanding of the Muslim presence in America.” – from document introduction

Keywords: Mosques

 

Paul Findley, Silent no more: confronting America’s false images of Islam (2001)

Summary: “Paul Findley, a 22-year veteran of Congress, chronicles his long, far-flung trail of discovery through the World Of Islam: the false stereotypes that linger in the minds of the American people, the corrective actions that the leaders of America’s seven million Muslims are undertaking, and the community’s remarkable progress in mainstream politics.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Muslims on the Americanization path? (2000)

Summary: “Like all religious minorities in America, Muslims must confront a host of difficult questions concerning faith and national identity…While the Muslims of America are indeed on the path to Americanization, what that means and what that will yield remains uncertain.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Identity

 

Michael W. Suleiman, Arabs in America: building a new future (1999)

Summary: “The contributors discuss an assortment of different communities…in order to illustrate the range of Arab emigre experience. More broadly, they examine Arabs in the legal system, youth and family, health and welfare, as well as Arab-American identity, political activism, and attempts by Arab immigrants to achieve respect and recognition in their new homes. They address both the present situation for Arab-Americans and prospects for their future.” – Temple University Press

Keywords: Arabs; New Immigrants

 

Gisela Webb, Windows of faith: Muslim women scholar-activists of North America (1999)

Summary: “These essays by Islamic women scholars in the USA give voice to and are evidence of the growing network of Muslim women involved with the issues of women’s human rights through scholarship activism.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Gender; Human Rights

 

Shamita Das Dasgupta, A patchwork shawl: chronicles of South Asian women in America (1998)

Summary: “Sheds light on the lives of a segment of the U.S. immigrant population that has long been relegated to the margins. It focuses on women’s lives that span different worlds: Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, and the United States. This collection of essays by and about South Asian women in America challenges stereotypes by allowing women to speak in their own words. Together they provide discerning insights into the reconstruction of immigrant patriarchy in a new world, and the development of women’s resistance to that reconstruction.” – Rutgers University Press

Keywords:

 

Khalid M. Alkhazraji, Immigrants and cultural adaptation in the American workplace: a study of Muslim employees (1997)

Summary: “This book presents a model of employee acculturation, investigating how Muslim employees adapt to U.S. national and organizational cultures. …Responses from 339 Muslims revealed that most were inclined to retain their original culture rather than adopting U.S. national culture. In contrast, most accepted U.S. organizational cultures.” – Google Books

Keywords: New Immigrants

 

Evelyn Shakir, Bint Arab: Arab and Arab American women in the United States (1997)

Summary: “While attempting to correct stereotypes that picture Arab women as passive, mindless, and downtrodden, Shakir gives voice to women caught in a tug of war, usually waged within the family, between traditional values and the social and sexual liberties permitted women in the West. Complicating that battle has been the American suspicion of Arab peoples, which has sometimes pushed women―as guardians of a culture under attack―to resist the blandishments of American society.” – ABC-CLIO/Praeger

Keywords: Arabs; Gender

 

Carol L. Anway, Daughters of another path: experiences of American women choosing Islam (1995)

Summary: “Includes portions of stories from fifty-three American born women who have chosen to become Muslim. Why and how they came to Islam; what their lives are like as a result of that choice; How non-Muslims can relate to Muslims that are relatives, friends, co-workers, and acquaintances.” – Midwest Book Review

Keywords: Converts; Gender

 

Steven Barboza, American jihad: Islam after Malcolm X (1995)

Summary: “Introduces 50 members of the growing American Muslim population. With gentle proselytizing, the narratives and interviews relate conversion memories, immigrant tales, and other anecdotes about the U.S. Islamic experiences… Barboza conveys the impact of Malcolm X on Islam’s rapid growth and the American Muslims’ struggle for acceptance while trying to cultivate our understanding of the religion through conversations with diverse practitioners.” – Library Journal

Keywords: African Americans

 

C. Eric Lincoln, The black Muslims in America (3rd ed. 1994)

Summary: “This classic sociological study gives a concise, accessible introduction to Islam for Americans whose knowledge of religion is limited primarily to Judeo-Christianity. The book succinctly details the formation and development of the Black Muslim movement through its wide-ranging expressions in America today — a movement born as an organized form of religious and social protest against a society sharply divided by race. This edition includes a new foreword by Aminah B. McCloud, a new preface, and an extensive postscript by Lincoln in which he outlines the course of the Nation of Islam since the death of its formative leader, Elijah Muhammad …A section highlighting the public career of Malcolm X, Elijah Muhammad’s famous spokesperson turned cultural icon, is also included. ” – Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, The Muslims of America (1993)

Summary: “Focusing on the manner in which American Muslims adapt their institutions as they become increasingly an indigenous part of America, the essays discuss American Muslim self-images, perceptions of Muslims by non-Muslim Americans, leading American Muslim intellectuals, political activity of Muslims in America, Muslims in American prisons, Islamic education, the status of Muslim women in America, and the impact of American foreign policy on Muslims in the United States.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Gender; Identity; Prisons

 

Hakim Muhammed Rashid, In search of the path: socialization, education and the African-American Muslim (1989)

Keywords: African-Americans; Education

 

Elaine Hagopian, Arab Americans: a study in assimilation (1969)

Summary: A collection of papers including “The New Arab-American Community”, “The Woman’s Role in the Socialization of Syrian Americans in Chicago”, and “Nationalism and Traditional Preservations”.

Keywords: Arabs

+ ANTHROPOLOGY

Ahmed Afzal, Lone star Muslims: transnational lives and the South Asian experience in Texas (2014)

Summary: “Offers an engaging and insightful look at contemporary Muslim American life in Texas. It illuminates the dynamics of the Pakistani Muslim community in Houston, a city with one of the largest Muslim populations in the south and southwestern United States.  …Decentering dominant framings that flatten understandings of transnational Islam and Muslim Americans, such as ‘terrorist’ on the one hand, and ‘model minority’ on the other, Lone Star Muslims offers a glimpse into a variety of lived experiences.” – New York University Press

Keywords: South Asians

 

Sally Howell, Old Islam in Detroit: rediscovering the Muslim American past (2014)

Summary: “Old Islam in Detroit explores the rise of Detroit’s earliest Muslim communities. It documents the culture wars and doctrinal debates that ensued as these populations confronted Muslim newcomers who did not understand their manner of worship or the American identities they had created. Looking closely at this historical encounter, Old Islam in Detroit provides a new interpretation of the possibilities and limits of Muslim incorporation in American life.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Arabs, Michigan

 

Bayyinah S. Jeffries, A nation can rise no higher than its women: African American Muslim women in the movement for black self determination, 1950-1975 (2014)

Summary: “Challenges traditional notions and interpretations of African American, particularly women who joined the Original Nation of Islam during the Civil Rights-Black Power era. This book is the first major investigation of the subject that engages a wide scope of women from “The Nation” and utilizes a wealth of primary documents and personal interviews to reveal the importance of women in this community.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Anne Rypstat Richards, Muslims and American popular culture (2014)

Summary: “Offering a wide range of information without sacrificing depth, this set examines the ways that Islam and Muslims are depicted in American pop culture. The first volume tackles the entertainment industry, addressing comedy and theater, television, film, popular fiction and poetry, music, and digital culture. The second volume deals with print material and identity in Islam, covering black Muslims, journalism and digital media, societal trends and issues, Islamic-influenced architecture, and memoirs.” – School Library Journal

Keywords: Media

 

Zain Abdullah, Black Mecca: the African Muslims of Harlem (2013)

Summary: “takes us inside the lives of these new immigrants and shows how they deal with being a double minority in a country where both blacks and Muslims are stigmatized. Dealing with this dual identity, Abdullah discovers, is extraordinarily complex. …Abdullah weaves together the stories of these African Muslims to paint a fascinating portrait of a community’s efforts to carve out space for itself in a new country.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Africans; New Immigrants

 

Nahla al Huraibi, Islam, gender and migrant integration: the case of Somali immigrant families (2013)

Summary: “Addresses three questions: how do Somali immigrants negotiate gender notions and practices between those maintained in Somali culture and those adopted from mainstream American culture; how immigrants’ understandings of Islamic writings on gender shape the negotiation process and how the integration process shapes their understanding of Islamic gender discourse; and to what extent resultant gender perceptions and practices reflect the transnational integration and cultural hybridism of two or more cultures.” – LFB Scholarly Publishing

Keywords: Gender; Somalia

 

Yuting Wang, Between Islam and the American Dream: an immigrant Muslim community in Post-9/11 America (2013)

Summary: “Instead of treating Muslim immigrants as fundamentally different from others, this book views Muslims as multidimensional individuals whose identities are defined by a number of basic social attributes, including gender, race, social class, and religiosity. Each person portrayed in this ethnography is a complex individual, whose hierarchy of identities is shaped by particular events and the larger social environment.” – Routledge

Keywords: Civil Rights; Intersectionality

 

Evelyn Alsultany, Arabs and Muslims in the media: race and representation after 9/11 (2012)

Summary: “After 9/11, there was an increase in both the incidence of hate crimes and government policies that targeted Arabs and Muslims and the proliferation of sympathetic portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in the U.S. media. Arabs and Muslims in the Media examines this paradox and investigates the increase of sympathetic images of “the enemy” during the War on Terror.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Anan Ameri, Daily life of Arab Americans in the 21st century (2012)

Summary: “This much-needed study documents positive Arab-American contributions to American life and culture, especially in the last decade, debunking myths and common negative perceptions that were exacerbated by the 9/11 attacks and the War on Terror.” – ABC-CLIO

Keywords: Arab Americans

 

Maleeha Aslam, Gender-based explosions: the nexus between Muslim masculinities, jihadist Islamism and terrorism (2012)

Summary: “Aslam argues that gender is a fundamental battleground on which al Qaeda, the Taliban, and their types must be defeated. Issues of regressive radicalism, literalism, militancy, and terrorism can only be solved through people-centered interventions. Therefore, governments and civil society should promote an alternative culture of growth, self-expression, and actualization for Muslim men.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Gender; Terrorism

 

Hilal Elver, The headscarf controversy: secularism and freedom of religion (2012)

Summary: “An in-depth study of the escalating controversy over the right of Muslim women to wear headscarves. Examining legal and political debates in Turkey, several European countries including France and Germany, and the United States, Elver shows the troubling exclusion of pious Muslim women from the public sphere in the name of secularism, democracy, liberalism, and women’s rights.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Gender; Hijab

 

Nabeel Abraham, Arab Detroit 9/11: life in the terror decade (2011)

Summary: “In Detroit, new realities of political marginalization and empowerment are evolving side by side. As they explore the complex demands of life in the Terror Decade, the contributors to this volume create vivid portraits of a community that has fought back successfully against attempts to deny its national identity and diminish its civil rights.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arabs; Civil Rights; Michigan

 

Leila Ahmed, A quiet revolution: the veil’s resurgence, from the Middle East to America (2011)

Summary: “When she began her study, Ahmed assumed that the veil’s return indicated a backward step for Muslim women worldwide. What she discovered, however, in the stories of British colonial officials, young Muslim feminists, Arab nationalists, pious Islamic daughters, American Muslim immigrants, violent jihadists, and peaceful Islamic activists, confounded her expectations.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Gender; Hijab

 

Reza Aslan, Muslims and Jews in America: commonalities, contentions, and complexities (2011)

Summary: “This book is an exploration of contemporary Jewish-Muslim relations in the United States and the distinct and often creative ways in which these two communities interact with one another in the American context. Each essay discusses a different episode from the recent twentieth and current twenty-first century American milieu that links these two groups together.” – Palgrave MacMillan

Keywords: Interfaith Relations

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Becoming American?: the forging of Arab and Muslim identity in pluralist America (2011)

Summary: “Traces the history of Arab and Muslim immigration into Western society during the 19th and 20th centuries, revealing a two-fold disconnect between the cultures―America’s unwillingness to accept these new communities at home and the activities of radical Islam abroad. Urging America to reconsider its tenets of religious pluralism, Haddad reveals that the public square has more than enough room to accommodate those values and ideals inherent in the moderate Islam flourishing throughout the country.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arab Americans; Identity

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Muslim women in America: the challenge of Islamic identity today (2011)

Summary: “Centering on Muslims in America, the book investigates Muslim attempts to form a new “American” Islam. Such specific issues as dress, marriage, childrearing, conversion, and workplace discrimination are addressed. The authors also look at the ways in which American Muslim women have tried to create new paradigms of Islamic womanhood and are reinterpreting the traditions apart from the males who control the mosque institutions. A final chapter asks whether 9/11 will prove to have been a watershed moment for Muslim women in America.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Gender

 

Chris Heffelfinger, Radical Islam in America: Salafism’s journey from Arabia to the West (2011)

Summary: “Chris Heffelfinger describes the development of the Islamist movement, examines its efforts and influence in the West, and suggests strategies to reduce or eliminate the threat of Islamist terrorism. The book distinguishes Islamism (the fundamentalist political movement based on Islamic identity and values) from the Muslim faith and explores Islamists’ substantial inroads with Muslims and Muslim educational institutions in the West since the 1960s, as well as the larger relationship between Islamist political activism and militancy.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Terrorism

 

Sherman A. Jackson, Islam and the Blackamerican: looking toward the third resurrection (2011)

Summary: “Offers a trenchant examination of the career of Islam among the blacks of America. Jackson notes that no one has offered a convincing explanation of why Islam spread among Blackamericans (a coinage he explains and defends) but not among white Americans or Hispanics. The assumption has been that there is an African connection. In fact, Jackson shows, none of the distinctive features of African Islam appear in the proto-Islamic, black nationalist movements of the early 20th century. Instead, he argues, Islam owes its momentum to the distinctively American phenomenon of “Black Religion,” a God-centered holy protest against anti-black racism.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Junaid Rana, Terrifying Muslims: race and labor in the South Asian diaspora (2011)

Summary: “Highlights how transnational working classes from Pakistan are produced, constructed, and represented in the context of American empire and the recent global War on Terror. Drawing on ethnographic research that compares Pakistan, the Middle East, and the United States before and after 9/11, Junaid Rana combines cultural and material analyses to chronicle the worldviews of Pakistani labor migrants as they become part of a larger global racial system.” – Duke University Press

Keywords: South Asians; Terrorism

 

Kambiz GhaneaBassiri, A history of Islam in America: from the New World to the New World Order (2010)

Summary: “…traces the history of Muslims in the United States and their different waves of immigration and conversion across five centuries, through colonial and antebellum America, through world wars and civil rights struggles, to the contemporary era.” – Cambridge University Press

Keywords: Immigration

 

Jonathan Curiel, Al’ America: travels through America’s Arab and Islamic roots (2009)

Summary: “Curiel demonstrates that many of America’s most celebrated places—including the Alamo in San Antonio, the French Quarter of New Orleans, and the Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina—retain vestiges of Arab and Islamic culture. Likewise, some of America’s most recognizable music—the Delta Blues, the surf sounds of Dick Dale, the rock and psychedelia of Jim Morrison and the Doors—is indebted to Arab music. And some of America’s leading historical figures, from Ralph Waldo Emerson to Elvis Presley, relied on Arab or Muslim culture for intellectual sustenance.” – The New Press

Keywords: Arabs; History

 

Daveed Gartenstein-Ross, Homegrown terrorists in the U.S. and U.K.: an empirical examination of the radicalization process (2009)

Summary: “To date, no study has empirically examined the process through which these terrorists are radicalizing, which constitutes a substantial gap in the literature. This study seeks to address that gap through an empirical examination of 117 homegrown “jihadist” terrorists from the U.S. and U.K.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Terrorism

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Educating the Muslims of America (2009)

Summary: “…considered here are other dimensions of American Islamic education and the ways in which Muslims are rising to the task of educating the American public in the face of increasing hostility and prejudice. This timely volume is the first dedicated entirely to the neglected topic of Islamic education in this country.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Education; Youth

 

Jennifer Leila Holsinger, Residential patterns of Arab Americans: race, ethnicity and spatial assimilation (2009)

Summary: “Holsinger examines the ways that race and ethnicity are manifest in the urban landscape by analyzing the segregation and neighborhood characteristics of Arab Americans. …The advantage experienced by this diverse population relative to non-White racial and ethnic minorities suggests that immigration history, racial status and human capital shape the residential experience of Arab Americans.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arab Americans

 

Hasan Kaplan, Psychology of new Muslim identity in America (2009)

Summary: “Religion appears to be the essential factor influencing the second generation Muslim adolescents’ identity development and their integration into American society. …Very little is known about how they deal with their identity questions and how they more fully integrate or negotiate their multiple allegiances. This study will give you a glimps from the struggle that these young people experience between two conflicting worldviews in order to find their own niche in life.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Identity

 

Liyakat Nathani Takim, Shi’ism in America (2009)

Summary: “Both tracing the early history and illuminating the more recent past with surveys and interviews, Takim explores the experiences of this community. Filling an important scholarly gap, he also demonstrates how living in the West has impelled the Shi’i community to grapple with the ways in which Islamic law may respond to the challenges of modernity.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Islamic Law; Shi’ite

 

Amaney A. Jamal, Race and Arab Americans before and after 9/11: from invisible citizens to visible subjects (2008)

Summary: “Transcending multiculturalist discourses that have simply ‘added on’ the category ‘Arab American’ to the landscape of U.S. racial and ethnic studies after the attacks of September 11th, 2001, this volume locates September 11 as a turning point, rather than a beginning, in Arab Americans’ diverse engagements with ‘race’.” – Syracuse University Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; Civil Rights

 

Akel Ismail Kahera, Deconstructing the American mosque: space, gender and aesthetics (2008)

Summary: “The absence of a single, authoritative model and the plurality of design nuances reflect the heterogeneity of the American Muslim community itself, which embodies a whole spectrum of ethnic origins, traditions, and religious practices ….explores the history and theory of Muslim religious aesthetics in the United States since 1950.” – University of Texas Press

Keywords: Mosques

 

Jamillah Karim, American Muslim women: negotiating race, class, and gender within the ummah (2008)

Summary: “This ethnographic study of African American and South Asian immigrant Muslims in Chicago and Atlanta explores how Islamic ideals of racial harmony and equality create hopeful possibilities in an American society that remains challenged by race and class inequalities. The volume focuses on women who, due to gender inequalities, are sometimes more likely to move outside of their ethnic Muslim spaces and interact with other Muslim ethnic groups in search of gender justice.” – New York University Press

Keywords: African Americans; Gender; South Asians

 

Gary Paul Nabhan, Arab/American: landscape, culture, and cuisine in two great deserts (2008)

Summary: “In an era when some Arabs and Americans have markedly distanced themselves from one another, Nabhan has been prompted to explore their common ground, historically, ecologically, linguistically, and gastronomically. Arab/American is not merely an exploration of his own multicultural roots but also a revelation of the deep cultural linkages between the inhabitants of two of the world’s great desert regions.” – University of Arizona Press

Keywords: Arabs

 

Michael Nash, Islam among urban blacks: Muslims in Newark, New Jersey – a social history (2008)

Summary: “Examines the evolution of Muslim community development in our nation’s third oldest city, Newark, New Jersey. It is an historical account of the efforts of a diverse community that over several decades grappled with the challenge of establishing a respected place for their Islamic lifestyle within the United States of America. Further, it is a story linked closely to the experience of African Americans who have claimed Islam as their religion and struggled to create and to maintain an identity in the social fabric of Newark’s twentieth-century Black religious culture.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; New Jersey

 

Selcuk R. Sirin, Muslim American youth: understanding hyphenated identities through multiple methods (2008)

Summary: “The volume offers a critical conceptual framework to aid in understanding Muslim American identity formation processes, a framework which can also be applied to other groups of marginalized and immigrant youth.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Identity; Youth

 

Stephen Young, Being Muslim in Boston: identity in the Islamic Society of Boston (2008)

Summary: “In this book, the author explores the lives of the Muslims of the Islamic Society of Boston (ISB), a diverse community whose members strive to adapt to the American environment through the embrace of a distinctively Islamic identity. This work examines such subjects as modes of interpretation of Islamic knowledge, attitudes toward religious education for children, marriage within and between ethnic groups, attitudes toward sex and gender, the use of the hijab, and race and ethnic relations, both within and outside the mosque itself.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Boston; Identity

 

Geneive Abdo, Mecca and Main Street: Muslim life in America after 9/11 (2007)

Summary: “Gaining unprecedented access to Muslim communities in America, [Abdo] traveled across the country, visiting schools, mosques, Islamic centers, radio stations, and homes. She reveals a community tired of being judged by American perceptions of Muslims overseas and eager to tell their own stories.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights

 

Arab American National Museum, Telling our story: the Arab American National Museum (2007)

Summary:Telling Our Story is a rich visual and narrative collection celebrating the history, culture, and diversity of the Arab American community. The volume chronicles the founding of the Arab American National Museum from several viewpoints, and offers a detailed tour through its major exhibits.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arab Americans

 

Katherine Bullock, Rethinking Muslim women and the veil: challenging historical & modern stereotypes (2007)

Summary: “This work focuses on the popular Western cultural view that the veil is oppressive for Muslim women and highlights the underlying patterns of power behind this constructed image of the veil.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights; Gender; Hijab

 

Edward E. Curtis, Black Muslim religion in the Nation of Islam, 1960-1975 (2006)

Summary: “Offers the first comprehensive examination of the rituals, ethics, theologies, and religious narratives of the Nation of Islam, showing how the movement combined elements of Afro-Eurasian Islamic traditions with African American traditions to create a new form of Islamic faith.” – University of North Carolina Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Jerald F. Dirks, Muslims in American history: a forgotten legacy (2006)

Summary: “Confronts the prevalent myth that Islam in America is a relatively recent phenomenon. In reality, there is a centuries long history of the Muslim presence in America, which is all too often overlooked or misidentified.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Aminah Beverly McCloud, Transnational Muslims in American society (2006)

Summary: “This in-depth yet accessible guide to Islamic immigrants from the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Africa challenges the widely held perception that Islam is monolithic and exclusively Arab in identity and expression. Offering a topical discussion of Islamic issues, the author argues that there is no one immigrant Islam community but a multifaceted and multi-cultural Islamic world.” – University Press of Florida

Keywords: Africans; South Asians; Transnational

 

Rosina J. Hassoun, Arab Americans in Michigan (2005)

Summary: “Despite their considerable presence, Arab Americans have always been a misunderstood ethnic population in Michigan, even before September 11, 2001 imposed a cloud of suspicion, fear, and uncertainty over their ethnic enclaves and the larger community.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arab-Americans; Michigan

 

Dennis Walker, Islam and the search for African American nationhood: Elijah Muhammed, Louis Farrakhan, and the Nation of Islam (2005)

Summary: “The presence of Islam in America is as long-standing as the arrival of the first captive Muslims from Africa, making Islam one of America’s formative religions. But the long-suppressed indigenous Islam didn’t resurface in organized form until the 1930s, when it infused the politico-spiritual drive by the Noble Drew ‘Ali and the Honorable Elijah Muhammad to address the appalling social conditions of the ghettoized black masses of the North. Elijah Muhammad’s Nation of Islam would prove to be the most extensive, influential and durable of African-American self-generated organizations.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

JoAnn D’Alisera, An imagined geography: Sierra Leonean Muslims in America (2004)

Summary: “Studying Sierra Leonean Muslims living in greater Washington, D.C., [D’Alisera] shows how these immigrants maintain intense and genuine community ties through weddings, rituals, and travel, across both vast urban spaces and national boundaries. D’Alisera examines two primary issues: Sierra Leoneans’ engagement with their homeland, to which they frequently traveled and often sent their children for upbringing until the outbreak of the civil war; and the Sierra Leonean interaction with a diverse, multicultural, increasingly global Muslim community that is undergoing its own search for identity.” – University of Pennsylvania Press

Keywords: Africans; New Immigrants; Sierra Leone

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Not quite American?: the shaping of Arab and Muslim identity in the United States (2004)

Summary: “In this essay Yvonne Haddad explores the history of immigration and integration of Arab Muslims in the United States and their struggle to legitimate their presence in the face of continuing exclusion based on race, nationalist identity, and religion.” – Baylor University Press

Keywords: Arabs; Identity

 

Bruce B. Lawrence, New faiths, old fears: Muslims and other Asian immigrants in American religious life (2004)

Summary: “The fastest-growing religions in America–faster than all Christian groups combined–are Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Sikhism. In this remarkable book, a leading scholar of religion asks how these new faiths have changed or have been changed by the pluralist face of American civil society. How have these new religious minorities been affected by the deep-rooted American ambivalence toward foreign traditions? Bruce Lawrence casts a comparativist eye on the American religious scene and explores the ways in which various groups of Asian immigrants have, and sometimes have not, been integrated into the American polity. ” – Columbia University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; South Asians

 

Iftikhar H. Malik, Islam and modernity: Muslims in Europe and the United States (2004)

Summary: “This is not the first time that conflict has arisen between Muslims in the West and their other communities — this book examines a long history of volatile social relations based on extensive travels and research across four continents. Iftikhar H. Malik offers a wealth of case studies ranging from Muslim Spain and the Ottoman Empire to the present day; from the eruptions of anti-Islamic feeling over the Salman Rushdie affair to the demonization of Islam currently running high on the agenda of the ‘war on terror’.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Terrorism; Transnational

 

Jen’nan Ghazal Read, Culture, class and work among Arab-American women (2004)

Summary: “Read’s findings challenge assumptions about variations in ethnic women’s labor force participation. Arab cultural values play an important role in determining the position of women of Arab descent in American society.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Gender; Intersectionality

 

Garbi Schmidt, Islam in urban America: Sunni Muslims in Chicago (2004)

Summary: “In this detailed study of an immigrant community in Chicago, Garbi Schmidt considers the formation and meaning of an ‘American Islam.’ This vivid portrait of the people and the institutions that draw them together contributes to the academic literature on ethnic and religious identity at the same time as it depicts an immigrant community’s struggle against bias and forces that threaten its cohesion.” – Temple University Press

Keywords: Chicago; New Immigrants

 

Janice Marschner, California’s Arab Americans (2003)

Summary: “Provides sketches of a cross-section of Arab American families in California — both early and later arrivals. The first five chapters summarize geographical, sociological, and historical facts about the Arab world—providing an understanding about why and when immigration occurred. The remaining ten chapters containing the family histories correspond to the typical regional divisions of California” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arab Americans; California

 

Richard Brent Turner, Islam in the African-American experience (2nd ed., 2003)

Summary: “Turner places the study of Islam in the context of the racial, ethical, and political relations that influenced the reception of successive presentations of Islam, including the West African Islam of slaves, the Ahmadiyya Movement from India, the orthodox Sunni practice of later immigrants, and the Nation of Islam. This second edition features a new introduction, which discusses developments since the earlier edition, including Islam in a post-9/11 America.” – Indiana University Press

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Edward E. Curtis, Islam in black America (2002)

Summary: “Examines the origin and development of modern African-American Islamic thought. Curtis notes that intellectual tensions in African-American Islam parallel those of Islam throughout its history—most notably, whether Islam is a religion for a particular group of people or whether it is a religion for all people….Ultimately, Curtis argues, the interplay of particular and universal interpretations of the faith can allow African-American Islam a vision that embraces both a specific group of people and all people.” – SUNY Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Robert Dannin, Black pilgrimage to Islam (2002)

Summary: “Drawing on hundreds of interviews conducted over a period of several years, Dannin provides an unprecedented look inside the fascinating and little understood world of black Muslims. He discovers that the well-known and cult-like Nation of Islam represents only a small part of the picture. Many more African-Americans are drawn to Islamic orthodoxy, with its strict adherence to the Qur’an.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Amina Mohammed-Arif, Salaam America: South Asian Muslims in New York (2002)

Summary: “This study examines the regrouping of the religious community and the reinvention of group identity in first and second-generation immigrants. By transplanting many of their institutions to the US (particularly in New York), Muslim immigrants succeeded in establishing their presence in the American landscape without arousing significant concern in the host community.” – Anthem Press

Keywords: New York; South Asians

 

Museum of the City of New York, A community of many worlds: Arab Americans in New York City (2002)

Summary: “Published in conjunction with an exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York, this collection of 17 essays ranges from the personal to the academic and covers a wide array of topics, such as Arabic poetry, immigration patterns, community formation and the sustaining of cultural traditions.” – Publishers Weekly

Keywords: Arab Americans; New York

 

Richard Wormser, American Islam: growing up Muslim in America (2002)

Summary: “Young Muslims speak out about everyday concerns — family, school, relationships — revealing how they maintain their identity and adapt their religious and cultural traditions to fit into America’s more permissive society. A historical overview of Islam, an interpretation of the basic tenets of the Quran, and a close look at the growth of Islam in African-American communities rounds out the first-person accounts of daily life.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; Youth

 

Asma Gull Hasan, American Muslims: the new generation (2001)

Summary: “Twenty-four-year-old Asma Hassan calls herself a Muslim feminist cowgirl (she was raised in Pueblo, Colorado). Convinced that Muslim Americans are the victims of mistaken identity (our fellow citizens think all Muslims are terrorists and women-oppressors), Hassan breaks through the stereotypes and generalizations to talk about the religion and the believers she knows from the inside.” – Bloomsbury Publishing

Keywords: Youth

 

Nabeel Abraham, Arab Detroit: from margin to mainstream (2000)

Summary: “The volume is divided into six sections – Qualities/Quantities, Work, Religion, Politics, Life Journeys, and Ethnic Futures – each with a cogent introduction by the editors that seeks to draw out larger themes.” – Journal of American Ethnic History

Keywords: Arabs; Michigan

 

Clifton E. Marsh, The lost-found Nation of Islam in America (2000)

Summary: “Sheds light on The Nation of Islam and Minister Louis Farrakhan, from the ideological splits in the Nation of Islam during the 1970s, to the growth and expanding influence in the 1990s.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Garbi Schmidt, American Medina: a study of the Sunni Muslim immigrant communities in Chicago (2000)

Summary: “Schmidt seeks, on basis of two periods of extended fieldwork, to provide a description of some activist strata of these religious communities. The description is framed by the portrayal of a number of Muslim institutions existing within the city and the interpretation of Islam that takes place within them. Accordingly, the book grants us a view of the life and activities of a number of Chicago’s Muslim Sunday Schools, full-time schools, Qur’anic schools, Muslim colleges, students’ associations, major Muslim centers, and “paramosques”, as they appear by the late 1990s.” – Lund University Press

Keywords: Chicago; New Immigrants

 

Sangeeta R. Gupta, Emerging voices: South Asian American women redefine self, family and community (1999)

Summary: “This collection of essays focuses on the experiences of South Asian immigrant women living in North America… The ‘voices’ span different generations of South Asian women, from those who were born in India and moved because of their fathers/husbands, to second generation American-born South Asian girls, being raised in bicultural situations. Similarly, they vary by their religious and regional affiliations. The authors range from feminist scholars who have conducted studies on groups of South Asian women to young graduate students who have presented first-person accounts of their own complex experiences as women of ‘colour’ coming to terms with living on the margins of a dominant culture, and who in their personal lives live with the constant pressure to ’conform to two sets of relational ideals’.” – Indian Journal of Gender Studies

Keywords: Gender; South Asians

 

Sulayman S. Nyang, Islam in the United States of America (1999)

Summary: “Working on the assumption that American Muslims are still unknown to most Americans, the author addresses several issues which are relevant to the whole discussion of religious plurality and multiculturalism in American society. Its contents range from Islam and the American Dream to the birth and development of the Muslim press in the United States.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Multiculturalism

 

Allan D. Austin, African Muslims in antebellum America: transatlantic stories and spiritual struggles (1997)

Summary: “A condensation and updating of his African Muslims in Antebellum America: A Sourcebook (1984), noted scholar of antebellum black writing and history Dr. Allan D. Austin explores, via portraits, documents, maps, and texts, the lives of 50 sub-Saharan non-peasant Muslim Africans caught in the slave trade between 1730 and 1860.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; Africans

 

Kambiz GhaneaBassiri, Competing visions of Islam in the United States: a study of Los Angeles (1997)

Summary: “This book fills a void in the study of Muslims in the United States, presenting the first in-depth study of the large Muslim population in Los Angeles County. It examines an array of issues facing the American Muslim population, ranging from gender and ethnicity to political and da ‘wa (missionary) activities. This study inquires into the role Muslims see for themselves and their religious tradition in the United States and presents the diverse views of Islam held by Muslims in America today.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: California

 

Jack Shaheen, Arab and Muslim stereotyping in American popular culture (1997)

Summary: “concentrates…on the stereotyping of Muslims in the United States, which in many ways has subsumed the original problem of Arab-American stereotyping. To explain to readers why it is important to distinguish between stereotypes and realities, Shaheen submits a series of meticulously footnoted findings concerning the Muslim presence in the world in general and the United States in particular, as well as the Christian Arab presence in both.” – Washington Report on Middle East Affairs

Keywords: Arabs; Media

 

Linda S. Walbridge, Without forgetting the imam: Lebanese Shi’ism in an American community (1997)

Summary: “An ethnographic study of the religious life of the Lebanese Shi’ites of Dearborn, Michigan, the largest Muslim community outside of the Middle East. Based on four years of fieldwork, this book explores how the Lebanese who have emigrated, most in the past three decades, to the United States, have adapted to their new surroundings.” – Wayne State University Press

Keywords: Arabs; Lebanon; Shi’ite

 

Barbara C. Aswad, Family and gender among American Muslims: issues facing Middle Eastern immigrants and their descendants (1996)

Summary: “From the social and historical conditions of the Muslim migration to a range of issues affecting Muslim American life, the contributors provide new and valuable information on topics like intergenerational conflict about identity and values, intermarriage, religious and community involvement, gender and family structure, education, the needs of the elderly, and physical and mental health problems, including AIDS.” – Temple University Press

Keywords: Family; Gender

 

Mattias Gardell, In the name of Elijah Muhammed: Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam (1996)

Summary: “Tells the story of the Nation of Islam—its rise in northern inner-city ghettos during the Great Depression through its decline following the death of Elijah Muhammad in 1975 to its rejuvenation under the leadership of Louis Farrakhan. Mattias Gardell sets this story within the context of African American social history, the legacy of black nationalism, and the long but hidden Islamic presence in North America.” – Duke University Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Ernest McCarus, The development of Arab-American identity (1994)

Summary: “Looks at all aspects–political, religious, and social–of the Arab-American experience.” – University of Michigan Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; Identity

 

Aminah Beverly McCloud, African American Islam (1994)

Summary: “Challenges…myths by contextualizing the experience and history of African American Islamic life. This is the first book to investigate the diverse African American Islamic community on its own terms, in its own language and through its own synthesis of Islamic history and philosophy.” – Routledge

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Al-Hajj Wali Akbar Muhammed, Muslims in Georgia: a chronology and oral history (1994)

Summary: “compiled to serve as a convenient repository of important facts and events related to the presence of Muslims in the United States — more specifically the State of Georgia.” – from the author’s website

Keywords: African-Americans; Georgia

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Mission to America: five Islamic sectarian communities in North America (1993)

Summary: “Islam in the United States has developed a fascinating and diverse range of interpretations. Based in large part on community documents and on interviews and correspondence with community members, this study is the first look at these sectarian movements in the hundred-year history of Muslim religious development in the United States.” – University Press of Florida

Keywords: Sectarian

 

Ron Kelley, Irangeles: Iranians in Los Angeles (1993)

Summary: “This compelling collection of photographs, essays, and interviews explores…the Iranian presence in Southern California. While capturing the remarkable diversity of this immigrant community, Irangeles also confronts the sprawling metropolis that is increasingly influenced by its large ethnic and immigrant populations. Iranians, too, are inexorably linked to the demographic changes in California—changes that raise questions of assimilation and cultural survival—and that will see minority populations become the majority in the next century.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: California; Iran

 

Omar Khalidi, Indian Muslims in North America (1990)

Summary: A collection of articles about the culture of Indian Muslims in North America, derived from the proceedings of a 1989 conference held by the Islamic Society of North America. Includes an extensive bibliography.

Keywords: India; South Asians

 

Martha Lee, The Nation of Islam: an American millenarian movement (1989)

Summary: “Covering the Black Muslim religion, the Nation of Islam, in America since the turn of the 20th century to 1986, this study documents the transformation of the Nation, after the death of Elijah Mohammed, into two quite different entities.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Raymond Brady Williams, Religions of immigrants from India and Pakistan: new threads in the American tapestry (1988)

Summary: “the first comprehensive study of the religious groups formed in the United States by immigrants from India and Pakistan, of the adaptive and organizational patterns developed by these groups, and of their continuing influence on the fabric of American religion and culture. Through analysis of demographic statistics and information gathered in interviews, the book provides an overview of the variety of religions practiced by Indian and Pakistani Americans, the size of these religious groups, and the range of ecumenical, ethnic, sectarian, and national organizations.” – Cambridge University Press

Keywords: India; Pakistan

 

Clifton E. Marsh, From black Muslims to Muslims: the transition from separatism to Islam, 1930-1980 (1984)

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Sameer Y. Abraham, Arabs in the New World: studies on Arab-American communities (1983)

Summary: “Brings together the work of ten social scientists who have studied various aspects of the Arab-American immigrant experience…[includes a] historical profile [and] a micro-view of Detroit’s Arabic-speaking communities.” – Middle East Journal

Keywords: Arabs; New Immigrants

 

Earle H. Waugh, The Muslim community in North America (1983)

Summary: “Fourteen scholars examine what it is like to be a Muslim in North America today-the pressures inherent in an increasingly secular society; the need for people from radically different cultures to work together to maintain their religion; and the struggles of black Muslims to graft an indigenous North American branch onto mainline Islam.” – The University of Alberta Press

Keywords: African-Americans; North America

 

Sameer Y. Abraham, The Arab world and Arab-Americans: understanding a neglected minority (1981)

Keywords: Arabs

 

Viviane Douche-Boulos, Cedars by the Mississippi: Lebanese-Americans in the Twin Cities (1978)

Summary: A history of Lebanese immigrants in Minnesota.

Keywords: Arabs; Lebanon; Minnesota

 

Barbara C. Aswad, Arabic-speaking communities in the United States (1974)

Keywords: Arabs

+ BIOGRAPHY

Sabeeha Rehman, Threading my prayer rug: one woman’s journey from Pakistani Muslim to American Muslim (2016)

Summary: “A richly textured reflection on what it is to be a Muslim in America today. It is also the revealing, always hopeful story of an immigrant’s daily struggles, balancing assimilation with preserving heritage, overcoming religious barriers from within and distortions of Islam from without, and confronting issues of children growing up Muslim.” – Arcade Publishing

Keywords: Gender; South Asian

 

Randy Roberts, Blood brothers: the fatal friendship between Muhammed Ali and Malcolm X (2016)

Summary: “Acclaimed historians Randy Roberts and Johnny Smith reconstruct the worlds that shaped Malcolm and Clay, from the boxing arenas and mosques, to postwar New York and civil rights-era Miami. In an impressively detailed account, they reveal how Malcolm molded Cassius Clay into Muhammad Ali, helping him become an international symbol of black pride and black independence… Blood Brothers is the story of how Ali redefined what it means to be a black athlete in America—after Malcolm first enlightened him.” – Perseus Academic

Keywords: Civil Rights; Nation of Islam

 

Moustafa Bayoumi, This Muslim American life: dispatches from the War on Terror (2015)

Summary: “Reveals what the War on Terror looks like from the vantage point of Muslim Americans, highlighting the profound effect this surveillance  has had on how they live their lives. To be a Muslim American today often means to exist in an absurd space between exotic and dangerous, victim and villain, simply because of the assumptions people carry about you.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Keith Ellison, My country, ’tis of thee: my faith, my family, our future (2014)

Summary: “Filled with anecdotes, statistics, and social commentary, Ellison touches on everything from the Tea Party to Obama, from race to the immigration debate and more. He also draws some very clear distinctions between parties and shows why the deep polarization is unhealthy for America. Deeply patriotic, with My Country, ’Tis of Thee, Ellison strives to help define what it means to be an American today.” – Simon & Schuster

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Ranya Tabari Idliby, Burqas, baseball, and apple pie: being Muslim in America (2014)

Summary: “This is the story of one American Muslim family–the story of how, through their lives, their schools, their friends, and their neighbors, they end up living the challenges, myths, fears, hopes, and dreams of all Americans. They are challenged by both Muslims who speak for them and by Americans who reject them. In this moving memoir, Idliby discusses not only coming to terms with what it means to be Muslim today, but how to raise and teach her children about their heritage and religious legacy.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Identity

 

Najla Said, Looking for Palestine: growing up confused in an Arab-American family (2014)

Summary: “Najla Said grew up in New York City, confused and conflicted about her cultural background and identity. Said knew that her parents identified deeply with their homelands, but growing up in a Manhattan world that was defined largely by class and conformity, she felt unsure about who she was supposed to be, and was often in denial of the differences she sensed between her family and those around her.” – Penguin Books

Keywords: Arabs; Identity; Palestine

 

M. Zuhdi Jasser, A battle for the soul of Islam: an American Muslim patriot’s fight to save his faith (2013)

Summary: “Lays bare the crucial differences between Islam and the spiritual cancer known as Islamism and persuasively calls for radical reformation within the Muslim community in order to preserve liberty for all.” – Simon & Schuster

Keywords: Terrorism

 

Nada Prouty, Uncompromised: the rise, fall, and redemption of an Arab American patriot in the CIA (2011)

Summary: “In the wake of 9/11, at the height of anti-Arab fervor…federal investigators charged Prouty with passing intelligence to Hezbollah. Though the CIA and federal judge eventually exonerated Prouty of all charges, she was dismissed from the agency and stripped of her citizenship. In Uncompromised, Prouty tells her whole story in a bid to restore her name and reputation in the country that she loves.” – MacMillan Publishers

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Masood Farivar, Confessions of a mullah warrior (2010)

Summary: “At a time when the war in Afghanistan is the focus of renewed attention, and its outcome is more crucial than ever to our own security, Farivar draws on his unique experience as a native Afghan, a former mujahideen fighter, and a longtime U.S. resident to provide unprecedented insight into the ongoing collision between Islam and the West.” – Grove Press

Keywords: Afghanistan; Terrorism

 

Asma Gull Hasan, Red, white, and Muslim: my story of belief (2009)

Summary: “The book is directed primarily at non-Muslim Americans to show them Qur’anic texts and Islamic beliefs and practices that challenge unfavorable stereotypes. But Hasan also takes on her fellow Muslims, urging them to distinguish cultural mores from religious orthodoxy, especially concerning the treatment of women.” – Publishers Weekly

Keywords: Gender; Identity

 

Ferial Masry, Running for all the right reasons: a Saudi-born woman’s pursuit of democracy (2008)

Summary: “Chronicles Masry’s remarkable life, from her childhood in Mecca and her decision to immigrate to the U.S. to her career as an educator and her bold entry into the world of politics.” – Syracuse University Press

Keywords: Gender; Saudi Arabia

 

Hassan Qazwini, American crescent: a Muslim cleric on the power of his faith, the struggle against prejudice, and the future of Islam and America (2007)

Summary: “Throughout American Crescent, Qazwini offers a revelatory look at the tenets and history of Islam, defending it as a faith of peace and diversity, and challenging stereotypes and misconceptions promulgated by the media.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights

 

Umar F. Abd-Allah, A Muslim in Victorian America: the life of Alexander Russell Webb (2006)

Summary: “In this first-ever biography of Webb, Umar F. Abd-Allah examines Webb’s life and uses it as a window through which to explore the early history of Islam in America. Except for his adopted faith, every aspect of Webb’s life was, as Abd-Allah shows, quintessentially characteristic of his place and time. It was because he was so typically American that he was able to serve as Islam’s ambassador to America (and vice versa).” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: History

 

Maryam Qudrat Aseel, Torn between two cultures: an Afghan-American woman speaks out (2004)

Summary: “Aseel, a first-generation Afghan American, discusses current events–particularly those relating to Afghanistan–and what it means to be a Muslim in America after 9/11. She combines analysis with unique personal stories describing how her family balances ‘two value systems that have grown to signify polar extremes, those of the East and West.’” – School Library Journal

Keywords: Afghan; Gender

 

Asma Gull Hasan, Why I am a Muslim (2004)

Summary: “”Out of all the cultures in the world… true Islamic values, as embodied in the Qur’an and the life of the Prophet Muhammad, most closely resemble American values.” So asserts Hasan, who has devoted much of her adult life—she is not yet 30—to combating anti-Muslim prejudice. As in her first book, American Muslims, she passionately argues against stereotypes and in favor of an Islam that sounds a lot like Reform Judaism or liberal Christianity. This is the Islam she knew growing up in Pueblo, Colo.—an American girl who looked Chicana and attended a Catholic school.” – Publishers Weekly

Keywords: Arabs; Gender

 

Raymond G. Hanania, I’m glad I look like a terrorist: growing up Arab in America (1996)

Summary: “Explores the experience of one Palestinian Arab American and his life growing up on Chicago’s South Side, his service in the US Military during the Vietnam War, his beginning career in journalism covering Chicago City Hall, and his expansion into politics and media consulting. It explores Arab-Jewish relations in Chicago and the Chicagoland area, and how Arabs were treated in America before Sept. 11, 2001.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights; Youth

+ HEALTH

Manijeh Daneshpour, Family therapy with Muslims (2016)

Summary: Family Therapy with Muslims is the first guide for mental health professionals who work with Muslims in the family therapy setting. The book opens with a section defining the similarities across Muslim cultures, the effects of postcolonialism on Muslims, and typical Muslim family dynamics. The author then devotes a chapter to different models of family therapy and how they can specifically be applied to working with Muslim families. Case studies throughout the book involve families of many different backgrounds living in the West―including both immigrant and second generation families―that will give professionals concrete tools to work with clients of their own.” – Routledge

Keywords: Family; Mental Health

 

Mona M. Amer, Handbook of Arab American psychology (2015)

Summary: “Contains a comprehensive review of the cutting-edge research related to Arab Americans and offers a critical analysis regarding the methodologies and applications of the scholarly literature. It is a landmark text for both multicultural psychology as well as for Arab American scholarship.” – Routledge

Keywords: Arab Americans; Multiculturalism

 

Sylvia Nassar-McMillan, Biopsychosocial perspectives on Arab Americans: culture, development, and health (2015)

Summary: “Introduces an interdisciplinary lens by bringing together vital research on culture, psychosocial development, and key aspects of health and disease to address a wide range of salient concerns. Its scholarship mirrors the diversity of the Arab American population, exploring ethnic concepts in socio-historical and political contexts before reviewing findings on major health issues, including diabetes, cancer, substance abuse, mental illness, and maternal/child health.” – Springer

Keywords: Arab Americans

 

Sylvia Nassar-McMillan, Counseling & diversity: Arab Americans (2010)

Summary: “This monograph represents a comprehensive primer on counseling issues among Arab American clients” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arab Americans

 

Ahmed Nezar Kobeisy, Counseling American Muslims: understanding the faith and helping the people (2004)

Summary: “Author Kobeisy explains the range of true Muslim faith, shows us how unfair discrimination threatens and scars the mental health of American Muslims, and also demonstrates what counselors, teachers, social workers, and other helping professionals can do to understand the faith as well as help these people recover to live strong in the face of prejudice.” – Praeger

Keywords: Civil Rights; Mental Health

 

Earle H. Waugh, The Islamic tradition: religious beliefs and healthcare decisions (1999)

Summary: Summarizes Islamic beliefs affecting health care in the areas of doctor-patient relations, sexuality and procreation, reproductive health, genetics, transplants, mental health, and end-of-life care.

Keywords: Health

+ HISTORY

Edward E. Curtis, Muslim Americans in the military: centuries of service (2016)

Summary: “Illuminates the long history of Muslim service members who have defended their country and struggled to practice their faith. Profiling soldiers, marines, airmen, and sailors since the dawn of our country, Curtis showcases the real stories of Muslim Americans, from Omer Otmen, who fought fiercely against German forces during World War I, to Captain Humayun Khan, who gave his life in Iraq in 2004.” – Indiana University Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; History

 

Amir Hussein, Muslims and the making of America (2016)

Summary: “Far from undermining America, Islam and American Muslims have been, and continue to be, important threads in the fabric of American life. Hussain chronicles the history of Islam in America to underscore the valuable cultural influence of Muslims on American life. He then rivets attention on music, sports, and culture as key areas in which Muslims have shaped and transformed American identity. America, Hussain concludes, would not exist as it does today without the essential contributions made by its Muslim citizens.” – Baylor University Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; History

 

Karine V. Walther, Sacred interests: the United States and the Islamic world, 1821-1921 (2015)

Summary: “Excavates the deep history of American Islamophobia, showing how negative perceptions of Islam and Muslims shaped U.S. foreign relations from the Early Republic to the end of World War I. …a vital exploration of the crucial role the United States played in the Islamic world during the long nineteenth century–an interaction that shaped a historical legacy that remains with us today.” – University of North Carolina Press

Keywords: Orientalism; Transnational

 

Hani J. Bawardi, The making of Arab Americans: from Syrian nationalism to U.S. citizenship (2014)

Summary: “Hani Bawardi examines the numerous Arab American political advocacy organizations that thrived before World War I, showing how they influenced Syrian and Arab nationalism. He further offers an in-depth analysis exploring how World War II helped introduce a new Arab American identity as priorities shifted and the quest for assimilation intensified.” – University of Texas Press

Keywords: Arabs; Transnational

 

Denise Spellberg, Thomas Jefferson’s Quran: Islam and the founders (2013)

Summary: “Recounts how a handful of the Founders, Jefferson foremost among them, drew upon Enlightenment ideas about the toleration of Muslims (then deemed the ultimate outsiders in Western society) to fashion out of what had been a purely speculative debate a practical foundation for governance in America. In this way, Muslims, who were not even known to exist in the colonies, became the imaginary outer limit for an unprecedented, uniquely American religious pluralism that would also encompass the actual despised minorities of Jews and Catholics.” – Penguin Random House

Keywords: Multiculturalism

 

Jacob Rama Berman, American Arabesque: Arabs and Islam in the nineteenth century imaginary (2012)

Summary: “Examines representations of Arabs, Islam and the Near East in nineteenth-century American culture, arguing that these representations play a significant role in the development of American national identity over the century, revealing largely unexplored exchanges between these two cultural traditions that will alter how we  understand them today.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Arabs; Orientalism

 

Nathaniel Deutsch, Inventing America’s “worst” family: eugenics, Islam, and the fall and rise of the Tribe of Ishmael (2009)

Summary: “In what becomes a profoundly unsettling counter-history of the United States, Nathaniel Deutsch traces how the Ishmaels, whose patriarch fought in the Revolutionary War, were discovered in the slums of Indianapolis in the 1870s and became a symbol for all that was wrong with the urban poor. The Ishmaels, actually white Christians, were later celebrated in the 1970s as the founders of the country’s first African American Muslim community.” – University of California Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Timothy Marr, The cultural roots of American Islamicism (2006)

Summary: “Analyzes the historical roots of how the Muslim world figured in American prophecy, politics, reform, fiction, art and dress. Marr argues that perceptions of the Muslim world, long viewed not only as both an anti-Christian and despotic threat but also as an exotic other, held a larger place in domestic American concerns than previously thought.” – Cambridge University Press

Keywords: Orientalism; Transnational

 

Gregory Orfalea, The Arab Americans: a history (2005)

Summary: “Orfalea gives a detailed and highly readable account of the three major waves of Arab immigration to America, from 1878 to 1924, 1947 to 1966, and 1967 to the present” – Library Journal

Keywords: Arab Americans; New Immigrants

 

Ami Marvasti, Middle Eastern lives in America (2004)

Summary: “The place of Middle Easterners in the racial hierarchy of the United States remains relatively unexplored in scholarly research. In this book this authors present the everyday experiences of this population by specifically focusing on Arab and Iranian Americans. …Through concrete descriptions and analysis of how Arab and Iranian Americans are confronted with matters of ethnic and racial inequality, this work’s primary aim is to debunk entrenched stereotypes by bringing to the forefront the human complexity of the Middle Eastern experience.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Arabs; Iranian-Americans

 

Elizabeth Boosahda, Arab-American faces and voices: the origins of an immigrant community (2003)

Summary: “Draws on over two hundred personal interviews, as well as photographs and historical documents that are contemporaneous with the first generation of Arab Americans (Syrians, Lebanese, Palestinians), both Christians and Muslims, who immigrated to the  Americas between 1880 and 1915, and their descendants. Boosahda focuses on the Arab-American community in Worcester, Massachusetts, a major northeastern center for Arab immigration, and Worcester’s links to and similarities with Arab-American communities throughout North and South America.” – University of Texas Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; Massachusetts; New Immigrants

 

Robert J. Allison, The crescent obscured: the United States and the Muslim world, 1776-1815 (2000)

Summary: “Focusing on America’s encounter with the Barbary states of North Africa from 1776 to 1815, Robert Allison traces the perceptions and mis-perceptions of Islam in the American mind as the new nation constructed its ideology and system of government.” – University of Chicago Press

Keywords: Orientalism

 

Alixa Naff, Becoming American: the early Arab immigrant experience (1993)

Summary: “Naff focuses on the pre-World War I pioneering generation of Arabic-speaking immigrants, the generation that set the patterns for settlement and assimilation.” – Southern Illinois University Press

Keywords: Arabs; New Immigrants

 

Fuad Shaban, Islam and Arabs in early American thought: roots of Orientalism in America (1990)

Summary: Examines American perceptions of Islam and the Islamic world during the Barbary Wars, as demonstrated in contemporary scholarly writings and popular discourse.

Keywords: Arabs; Orientalism

 

Gregory Orfalea, Before the flames: a quest for the history of Arab Americans (1988)

Summary: “Select Arab American individuals and personalities receive special attention in short vignettes. Yet the book is substantively organized around the analysis of three successive groups of Arab immigration to the United States, all within the last one hundred years.” – Oral History Review

Keywords: Arabs

 

Eric J. Hooglund, Crossing the waters: Arab-speaking immigrants to the United States before 1940 (1987)

Summary: “More than 125,000 Arabs immigrated to the United States between 1890 and 1940. They came largely from villages in what is now Lebanon and Syria. Most of them were adherents of traditional Arab Christian denominations such as Maronite and Melkite rites Catholicism and the Greek Orthodox Church, but there were also small numbers of Arab Muslims. They established ethnic communities in industrial cities throughout the country, and like other immigrants, contributed to the evolution of American culture and society.” – arabamericanhistory.org

Keywords: Arabs; New Immigrants

 

Abdo A. Elkholy, The Arab Moslems in the United States: religion and assimilation (1966)

Summary: “This study was written to explore the variables associated with the differences in the degree of assimilation and religiosity between two Arab-Muslim communities in Toledo, Ohio and Detroit, Michigan, both of whom share identical religio-ethnic backgrounds. In the analysis of the data the author attempts to point out the fallacy of the previously assumed negative correlation between the two factors of religiosity and assimilation.” – Yale University Press

Keywords: Arabs; Michigan; Ohio

+ LAW

Salim Farrar & Ghena Krayem, Accommodating Muslims under common law: a comparative analysis (2016)

Summary: “The book explores the relationship between Muslims, the Common Law and Shariah post-9/11. The book looks at the accommodation of Shariah Law within Western Common Law legal traditions and the role of the judiciary, in particular, in drawing boundaries for secular democratic states with Muslim populations who want resolutions to conflicts that also comply with the dictates of their faith… Acknowledging the inherent pragmatism, flexibility and values of the Common Law, the authors argue that the controversial issue of accommodation of Shariah is not necessarily one that requires the establishment of a separate and parallel legal system.” – Routledge

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Amy Benson, Federal civil rights engagement with America’s Arab and Muslim communities (2015)

Summary: “This book examines the methods, goals and effectiveness of the federal government’s engagement with Arab and Muslim-American individuals and communities. Specifically, the book focuses on actions taken by the federal government to address, prevent and eradicate violations of civil rights laws against the Arab and Muslim-American communities, as well as efforts taken to ameliorate, eliminate or reduce religious, national-origin, and ethnic bias.” – Nova Publishers

Keywords: Civil Rights

 

Malachi D. Crawford, Black Muslims and the law: civil liberties from Elijah Muhammad to Muhammed Ali (2015)

Summary: “Reveals the Nation of Islam’s strategic efforts to engage governmental officials from a position of power, and suggests the federal executive, congressmen, judges, lawyers, law enforcement officials, prison administrators, state governments, and African American civic leaders held a common understanding of what it meant to be and not to be African American and religious in the period between World War II and the Vietnam War.” – Lexington Books

Keywords: African-Americans; Civil Rights; Nation of Islam

 

Khurram Dara, Contracting fear: Islamic law in the Middle East and Middle America (2015)

Summary: “Explains not only the history and origins of Islamic law but also the interesting role it has played in the politics of the Middle East and Middle America. Challenging the conventional wisdom that Islamic law is rigid and permanent, Dara argues that the political and cultural realities of its formation suggest otherwise and should change how Islamic law is thought of and discussed in both the East and the West.” – Cascade Publishers

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Azizah al-Hibri, Islamic jurisprudence: an American Muslim perspective (2014)

Summary: “Provides both the Muslim and non-Muslim reader with a basic understanding of the legal foundations of Islam. It introduces the sources of Islamic law and their significance in the hierarchy of Islamic jurisprudence while presenting Dr. al-Hibri’s articulation of the Islamic worldview, developed in light of modern day concerns, such as those relating to gender, race and class.” – American Bar Association

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Maurits Berger, Applying Sharia in the West: facts, fears and the future of Islamic rules on family relations in the West (2013)

Summary: “Examines in depth how Muslims in the West shape their normative behavior on the basis of Shari’a and how Western societies and legal systems react thereto.” – University of Chicago Press

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Marinos Diamantides, Islam, law and identity  (2012)

Summary: “Addresses broader and over-arching concerns about relationships between religion, human rights, law and modernity. Drawing on a variety of theoretical and empirical approaches, the collection presents law as central to the complex ways in which different Muslim communities and institutions create and re-create their identities around inherently ambiguous symbols of faith.” – Routledge

Keywords: Human Rights; Identity

 

Julie MacFarlane, Islamic divorce in North America: a Shari’a path in a secular society (2012)

Summary: “The most common way North American Muslims relate to shari’a is in their observance of Muslim marriage and divorce rituals; recourse to traditional Islamic marriage and, to a lesser extent, divorce is widespread. Julie Macfarlane has conducted hundreds of interviews with Muslim couples, as well as with religious and community leaders and family conflict professionals. Her book describes how Muslim marriage and divorce processes are used in North America, and what they mean to those who embrace them as a part of their religious and cultural identity.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Family; Islamic Law

 

Mark E. Hanshaw, Muslim and American?: straddling Islamic law and U.S. justice (2010)

Summary: “Explores the often competing demands that confront American Muslims from Islamic religious law and secular law. The conflict extends into many aspects of daily life, ranging from issues concerning divorce and child custody to the interpretation of contracts. …At the heart of Hanshaw’s legal analysis lies the very personal question of whether weaknesses in U.S. judicial processes serve to inhibit the free and full exercise of the Islamic faith.” – LFB Scholarly Publishing

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Kathleen M. Moore, The unfamiliar abode: Islamic law in the United States and Britain (2010)

Summary: “Explores the development of new forms of Islamic law and legal reasoning in the US and Great Britain, as well the Muslims encountering Anglo-American common law and its unfamiliar commitments to pluralism and participation, and to gender, family, and identity. The underlying context is the aftermath of 9/11 and 7/7, the two attacks that arguably recast the way the West views Muslims and Islam.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Tony Gaskew, Policing Muslim American communities: A compendium of post 9/11 interviews (2009)

Summary: “Examines the experiences and social conflicts facing Muslim Americans in the aftermath of September 11, 2001. It provides insight on how the highly politicized and tense atmosphere following the events of 9/11 impacted the relationship between law enforcement agencies and Muslim American communities.” – Edwin Mellen Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Robert F. Cochran, Faith and law: how religious traditions from Calvinism to Islam view American law (2008)

Summary: “Legal scholars from sixteen different religious traditions contend that religious discourse has an important function in the making, practice, and adjudication of American law, not least because our laws rest upon a framework of religious values. The book includes faiths that have traditionally had an impact on American law, as well as new immigrant faiths that are likely to have a growing influence.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Islamic Law; New Immigrants

 

Bill Maurer, Pious property: Islamic mortgages in the United States (2006)

Summary: “the Qur’an forbids the payment of interest, which places conventional home financing out of reach for observant Muslims. To meet the growing Muslim demand for home purchases, a market for home financing that would be halal, or permissible under Islamic law, has emerged. In Pious Property, anthropologist William Maurer profiles the emergence of this new religiously based financial service and explores the ways it reflects the influence of Muslim practices on American economic life and vice versa.” – Russell Sage Foundation

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

California Senate Office of Research, The Patriot Act, other post-9/11 enforcement powers and the impact on California’s Muslim communities (2004)

Summary: “the Senate Office of Research has examined the USA PATRIOT Act and associated federal powers that the government acquired to protect the country against domestic terrorism following the attacks of September 11, 2001. The office has looked at these issues from the perspective of members of Muslim communities in California. A broad cross-section of those communities, we discover, find the force of these new powers to be aimed against Muslims innocent of any connection to terrorist acts or known terrorist intentions.” – from the document’s executive summary

Keywords: California; Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Kathleen M. Moore, al-Mughtaribun: American law and the transformation of Muslim life in the United States (1995)

Summary: “Explores the influence of American law on Muslim life in the United States. It examines pluralism and religious toleration in America, viewed from the vantage point offered by the experiences of Muslims in the United States, a significant and growing part of an increasingly pluralistic society.” – SUNY Press

Keywords: Islamic Law

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Islamic values in the United States: a comparative study (1987)

Summary: “This ethnography of immigrant Muslims considers five Northeastern communities in detail. Including numerous interviews with members of these communities, this investigation provides a highly personal look at what it means to be a believing, practicing Muslim in America at a time when Islam is under the critical scrutiny of international news.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Identity; New Immigrants

+ POLITICAL SCIENCE

Juris Pupcenoks, Western Muslims and conflicts abroad: conflict spillover to diasporas (2015)

Summary: “Based on survey data, statistical datasets, more than sixty interviews with Muslim community leaders and activists, ethnographic research in London and Detroit, and open-source data, this book develops a theoretical explanation for how both differences in government policies and features of migrant-background communities interact to influence the nature of foreign-policy focused activism in migrant communities. Utilizing rigorous, mixed-methods case study analysis, the author comparatively analyses the reactions of the Pakistani community in London and the Arab Muslim community in Detroit to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq during the decade following 9/11. ” – Routledge

Keywords: Terrorism; Transnational

 

Jeffrey L. Thomas, Scapegoating Islam: intolerance, security, and the American Muslim (2015)

Summary: “Exploring the experience of Muslims in America following 9/11, this book assesses how anti-Muslim bias within the U.S. government and the larger society undermines American security and democracy.” – Praeger

Keywords: Civil Rights

 

Edan Ganie, How I became a terrorist: Islamophobia and the oppressive aftermath of 9/11 on the Muslim community (2014)

Summary: “September 11, 2001 was a day that shook the United States to its core. Often when Americans consider the many victims of the attacks, there is one group that few acknowledge as the on-going sufferers of the tragedy; that group is the Muslim community.” – Tate Publishing

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Carl W. Ernst, Islamophobia in America: the anatomy of intolerance (2013)

Summary: “The contributors document the history of anti-Islamic sentiment in American culture, the scope of organized anti-Muslim propaganda, and the institutionalization of this kind of intolerance.” – Palgrave MacMillan

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Robert Booth Fowler, Religion and politics in America: faith, culture, and strategic choices (5th ed., 2013)

Summary: “Incorporating the best and most up-to-date scholarship, the authors assess the politics of Roman Catholics; evangelical, mainline, and African American Protestants; Jews; Muslims and other conventional and not-so-conventional American religious movements. The author team also examines important subjects concerning religion and its relationship to gender, race/ethnicity, and class.” – Westview Press

Keywords: Interfaith Relations

 

Stuart Croft, Securitizing Islam: identity and the search for security (2012)

Summary: “Examines the impact of 9/11 on the lives and perceptions of individuals, focusing on the ways in which identities in Britain have been affected in relation to Islam. ‘Securitization’ describes the processes by which a particular group or issue comes to be seen as a threat, and thus subject to the perceptions and actions which go with national security.” – Cambridge University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Deepa Kumar, Islamophobia and the politics of empire (2012)

Summary: “In response to the events of 9/11, the Bush administration launched a “war on terror” ushering in an era of anti-Muslim racism, or Islamophobia. However, 9/11 did not create Islamophobia, an ideology which has become the handmaiden of imperialism. This book examines the historic relationship between Islamophobia and the agenda of empire-building.” – Haymarket Books

Keywords: Civil Rights; Orientalism

 

Nathan Chapman Lean, The Islamophobia industry: how the right manufactures fear of Muslims (2012)

Summary: “In recent years, Muslim-led terrorist attacks have declined yet anti-Muslim prejudice has soared to new peaks. The fear that the Islamophobia Industry has manufactured is so fierce in its grip on some populations that it drives them to do the unthinkable. This powerful and provocative book explores the dark world of monster making, examining in detail an interconnected, and highly organized cottage industry of fear merchants.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, Moving the mountain: beyond Ground Zero to a new vision of Islam in America (2012)

Summary: “Muslims in America who reject extremist or fundamentalist expressions of Islam at home and abroad feel the urgent need for a voice that can represent them in the current debate about Islam, America, and the West. Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf—the so-called Ground Zero Imam—has become that voice. This is his vision for a new, American Islam.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights; Transnational

 

Alia Malek, Patriot acts: narratives of post-9/11 injustice (2011)

Summary: “tells the stories of men and women who have been needlessly swept up in the War on Terror. In their own words, narrators recount personal experiences of the post-9/11 backlash that have deeply altered their lives and communities.” – McSweeney’s

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Lori A. Peek, Behind the backlash: Muslim Americans after 9/11 (2011)

Summary: “Letting the voices of 140 ordinary Muslim American men and women describe their experiences…presents moving accounts of prejudice and exclusion. Muslims speak of being subjected to harassment before the attacks, and recount the discrimination they encountered afterwards. Peek also explains the struggles of young Muslim adults to solidify their community and define their identity during a time of national crisis.” – Temple University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Irum Shiekh, Detained without cause: Muslims’ stories of detention and deportation in America after 9/11 (2011)

Summary: “Presents the first-person narratives of six Muslim men detained on flimsy or invented charges and ultimately deported after September 11, 2001. Shiekh is methodical about her research methods and explicit about her communication with detainees, who were humiliated, lied to, and abused in prison.” – Publishers Weekly

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Stephen Sheehi, Islamophobia: the ideological campaign against Muslims (2010)

Summary: “Examines the rise of anti-Muslim and anti-Arab sentiments in the West following the end of the Cold War through GW Bush’s War on Terror to the Age of Obama. Using ‘Operation Desert Storm’ as a watershed moment, Stephen Sheehi examines the increased mainstreaming of Muslim-baiting rhetoric and explicitly racist legislation, police surveillance, witch-trials and discriminatory policies towards Muslims in North America and abroad.” – Clarity Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Anny P. Bakalian, Backlash 9/11: Middle Eastern and Muslim Americans respond (2009)

Summary: “This book provides the first comprehensive analysis of the impact of the post-9/11 events on Middle Eastern and Muslim Americans as well as their organized response. Through fieldwork and interviews with community leaders, Anny Bakalian and Mehdi Bozorgmehr show how ethnic organizations mobilized to demonstrate their commitment to the United States while defending their rights and distancing themselves from the terrorists.” – University of California Press

Keywords: Arabs; Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Louise Cainkar, Homeland insecurity: the Arab American and Muslim American experience after 9/11 (2009)

Summary: “[Cainkar] argues that 9/11 did not create anti-Arab and anti-Muslim suspicion; rather, their socially constructed images and social and political exclusion long before these attacks created an environment in which misunderstanding and hostility could thrive and the government could defend its use of profiling. Combining analysis and ethnography, Homeland Insecurity provides an intimate view of what it means to be an Arab or a Muslim in a country set on edge by the worst terrorist attack in its history.” – Russell Sage Foundation

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Jocelyne Cesari, Muslims in the West after 9/11: religion, politics, and law (2009)

Summary: “Based on empirical studies of Muslims in the US and Western Europe, this edited volume posits the situation of Muslim minorities in a broader reflection on the status of liberalism in Western foreign policies. It also explores the changes in immigration policies, multiculturalism and secularism that have been shaped by the new international context of the ‘war on terror’.” – Routledge

Keywords: Civil Rights; Transnationalism

 

Detroit Arab American Study Team, Citizenship and crisis: Arab Detroit after 9/11 (2009)

Summary: “A groundbreaking study of social life, religious practice, cultural values, and political views among Detroit Arabs after 9/11, Citizenship and Crisis argues that contemporary Arab American citizenship and identity have been shaped by the chronic tension between social inclusion and exclusion that has been central to this population’s experience in America.” – Russell Sage Foundation

Keywords: Arabs; Identity; Michigan

 

Steven Salaita, The uncultured wars: Arabs, Muslims, and the poverty of liberal thought (2008)

Summary: “Through twelve stylish essays, Steven Salaita returns again and again to his core themes of anti-Arab racism and Islamophobia and the inadequacy of critical thought among the “chattering classes,” showing how racism continues to exist in the places where we would least expect it. …Salaita explores why Arabs are marginalized, and who seeks to benefit from this.” – University of Chicago Press

Keywords: Arabs; Civil Rights

 

Peter Gottschalk, Islamophobia: making Muslims the enemy (2007)

Summary: “This book shows graphically how political cartoons dramatically reveal Americans’ casual demonizing and demeaning of Muslims and Islam. And the villainizing is shown to be as common among liberals as conservatives. Islamophobia also discusses the misunderstanding of the Muslim world more generally, such as the assumption that Islam is primarily a Middle Eastern religion, whereas the majority of Muslims live in South and Southeast Asia, and the misperception that a significant portion of Muslims are militant fundamentalists, whereas only a small proportion are.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Melody Moezzi, War on error: real stories of American Muslims (2007)

Summary:War on Error brings together the stories of twelve young people, all vastly different but all American, and all Muslim.” – University of Arkansas Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Youth

 

Steven Salaita, Anti-Arab racism in the USA: where it comes from and what it means for politics (2006)

Summary: “Since 9/11 there has been a lot of criticism of America’s involvement in the middle east. Yet there has been little analysis of how America treats citizens of Arab or middle eastern origin within its own borders. Steven Salaita explores the reality of Anti-Arab racism in America. He blends personal narrative, theory and polemics to show how this deep-rooted racism affects everything from legislation to cultural life, shining a light on the consequences of Anti-Arab racism both at home and abroad. ” – Pluto Press

Keywords: Arabs; Civil Rights

 

Michael Welch, Scapegoats of September 11th: hate crimes and state crimes in the war on terror (2006)

Summary: “Drawing on topics such as ethnic profiling, the Abu Ghraib scandal, Guantanamo Bay, and the controversial Patriot Act, Welch looks at the significance of knowledge, language, and emotion in a post-9/11 world. In the face of popular and political cheerleading in the war on terror, this book presents a careful and sober assessment, reminding us that sound counterterrorism policies must rise above, rather than participate in, the propagation of bigotry and victimization.” – Rutgers University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Katherine Bullock, Muslim women activists in North America: speaking for ourselves (2005)

Summary: “In the eyes of many Westerners, Muslim women are hidden behind a veil of negative stereotypes that portray them as either oppressed, subservient wives and daughters or, more recently, as potential terrorists. Yet many Muslim women defy these stereotypes by taking active roles in their families and communities and working to create a more just society. This book introduces eighteen Muslim women activists from the United States and Canada who have worked in fields from social services, to marital counseling, to political advocacy in order to further social justice within the Muslim community and in the greater North American society.” – University of Texas Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Gender

 

Tram Nguyen, We are all suspects now: untold stories from immigrant communities after 9/11 (2005)

Summary: “Tram Nguyen reveals the human cost of the domestic war on terror and examines the impact of post-9/11 policies on people targeted because of immigration status, nationality, and religion. Nguyen’s evocative narrative reporting-about the families, detainees, local leaders, community advocates, and others-is from those living and suffering on the front lines.” – Beacon Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Quintan Wiktorowicz, Radical Islam rising: Muslim extremism in the West (2005)

Summary: “one of the first systematic attempts to explain why Westerners join radical Islamic groups. Quintan Wiktorowicz details the mechanisms that attract potential recruits, the instruments of persuasion that convince them that radical groups represent “real Islam,” and the socialization process that prods them to engage in risky extremism.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Terrorism; Transnational

 

Zahid H. Bukhari, Muslims’ place in the American public square: hopes, fears, and aspirations (2004)

Summary: “Project MAPS (Muslims in the American Public Square) began in 1999 to provide much-needed information on this understudied and immensely diverse group of six million Americans. This first volume emerging from the project, Muslims’ Place in the American Public Square, shows where the American Muslim community fits into the American religious and civic landscape both before and after 9/11.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Identity

 

Aladdin Elaasar, Silent victims: the plight of Arab and Muslim Americans in post 9/11 America (2004)

Summary: “The increasing public’s curiosity about the Arabs, Muslims and the Arab and Muslim Americans in the United States has been unprecedented. This book explains the phenomenon of stereotypes stigmatizing Arabs and Muslims, and how it has affected their lives, a phenomenon that demonized and dehumanized almost two billion people in this world.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights

 

Elaine Catherine Hagopian, Civil rights in peril: the targeting of Arabs and Muslims (2004)

Summary: “Muslims and Arab-Americans are increasingly under attack as a result of the US ‘war on terror’ – at home, as well as abroad. Since the tragic events of September 11, Arab and Muslim Americans have faced a major assault on their civil liberties. While targeting vulnerable groups and drawing on racist stereotypes about Arabs and Muslims, these measures threaten millions of people, including immigrants, activists, trade unionists, academics, writers, and anyone who the government wishes to define as a ‘threat’ to national security.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Nadia Batool Ahmad, Unveiling the real terrorist mind (2002)

Summary:  An interdisciplinary anthology that provides an analytic perspective on the 9/11 cataclysm. This collection of essays, poems, and articles explores issues of terrorism, genocide, race, and war from the view of 66 academics and peace activists from six continents. Contributing authors include Nobel Laureate Betty Williams, NYU law professor Derrick Bell, MIT professor Noam Chomsky, Georgetown professor John Esposito, author Howard Zinn, human rights activist Sara Flounders, former U.S. Congressman Paul Findley, former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark, U.S. Congressional candidate Bob Bowman, and others. 

Keywords: Terrorism

+ REFERENCE

Edward E. Curtis (ed.), The Bloomsbury reader on Islam in the West (2015)

Summary: “Brings together some of the most important, up-to-date scholarly writings published on this subject. The Reader explores not only the presence of Muslim religious practitioners in Europe and the Americas but also the impact of Islamic ideas and Muslims on Western politics, societies, and cultures.” – Bloomsbury Publishing

Keywords: History; Multiculturalism

 

Jane I. Smith, The Oxford handbook of American Islam (2015)

Summary: “covers the growth of Islam in America from the earliest Muslims to set foot on American soil to the current wave of Islamophobia. Topics covered include the development of African American Islam; pre- and post-WWII immigrants; Sunni, Shi`ite, sectarian and Sufi movements in America; the role and status of women, marriage, and family; and the Americanization of Islamic culture. Throughout these chapters the contributors explore the meaning of religious identity in the context of race, ethnicity, gender, and politics, both within the American Islamic community and in relation to international Islam.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: History

 

Juliane Hammer, The Cambridge companion to American Islam (2013)

Summary: “Offers a scholarly overview of the state of research on American Muslims and American Islam. The book presents the reader with a comprehensive discussion of the debates, challenges, and opportunities that American Muslims have faced through centuries of American history.” – Cambridge University Press

Keywords: Bibliography

 

 

Edward E. Curtis, The Columbia sourcebook of Muslims in the United States (2010)

Summary: “Sampling from speeches, interviews, editorials, stories, song lyrics, articles, autobiographies, blogs, and other sources, Curtis creates a patchwork narrative of Muslims from diverse ethnic and class backgrounds, religious orientations, and political affiliations. He begins with a history of Muslims in the United States, featuring the voices of an enslaved African Muslim, a Syrian Muslim sodbuster, a South Asian mystic-musician, and Malcolm X. Then he explores contemporary issues concerning Islam and gender, the involvement of Muslims in American politics, and emerging forms of Islamic spirituality.” – Columbia University Press

Keywords: Culture; History

 

Edward E. Curtis, Encyclopedia of Muslim-American history (2010, 2 volumes)

Summary: “…provides a new and broader, more inclusive approach to American history. Including nearly 300 articles, this two-volume reference book is the first to focus on this critical subject, covering all the historical and contemporary issues, events, people, court cases, themes, and activism relating to Muslim Americans.” – Infobase/Facts on File

Keywords: History; Bibliography

 

American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, Arab American bibliography (2009)

Summary: A non-comprehensive bibliography of books on Arab-Americans and their experiences.

Keywords: Bibliography

 

Edward E. Curtis, Muslims in America: a short history (2009)

Summary: “Muslims are neither new nor foreign to the United States. They have been a vital presence in North America since the 16th century. Muslims in America unearths their history, documenting the lives of African, Middle Eastern, South Asian, European, black, white, Hispanic and other Americans who have been followers of Islam. …Showing how Muslim American men and women participated in each era of U.S. history, the book explores how they have both shaped and have been shaped by larger historical trends.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: History

 

Jane I. Smith, Islam in America (2nd ed. 2009)

Summary: “This richly textured, critically acclaimed portrait of American Muslims introduces the basic tenets of the Muslim faith, surveys the history of Islam in North America, and profiles the lifestyles, religious practices, and worldviews of Muslims in the United States. The volume focuses specifically on the difficulty of living faithfully and adhering to tradition while adapting to an American way of life and addresses the role of women in Muslim culture, the raising and education of children, appropriate dress and behavior, and incidences of prejudice and unfair treatment.” – Columbia University Press

Keywords: History

 

Jocelyne Cesari, Encyclopedia of Islam in the United States (2007)

Summary: “Today, Islam and American Muslim populations are growing in importance in this country, and demand for information about them is high, especially in the aftermath of September 11, 2001. This A-to-Z encyclopedia will help students and other readers get a fast grip on pertinent holidays, terms, beliefs, practices, notables, and sects of the Islamic faith and Muslim practitioners in the United States.” – ABC-CLIO/Greenwood Press

Keywords: Reference

 

George W. Braswell Jr., Islam and America: answers to the 31 most-asked questions (2005)

Summary: “George Braswell is a recognized expert on the religion of Islam and on the Muslim beliefs and practices that Americans need to understand. This book will give readers the information they want and answer the questions they are asking. Beyond the media portrayals, Islam & America accurately reports the truth about this religion and its adherents.” – B&H Publishing

Keywords: Reference

 

Frederick Denny, Muslims in America (2004)

Summary: “From colonial sailors and adventurers to 19th-century peddlers and factory workers to post-World War II immigration, Muslims in America is a sweeping chronicle of Islamic religion and culture in the United States.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Culture; History

 

Karen Isaksen Leonard, Muslims in the United States: the state of research (2003)

Summary: “While many cursory press accounts dealing with Muslims in the United States have been published since 9/11, few people are aware of the wealth of scholarly research already available on the American Islamic population. In Muslims in the United States: The State of Research, Karen Isaksen Leonard mines this rich vein of research to provide a fascinating overview of the history and contemporary situation of American Muslim communities.” – Russell Sage Foundation

Keywords: Bibliography

 

James Beverly, Islamic faith in America (2002)

Summary: “Explores the impact of Muslims on American culture, social issues, and politics and offers a glimpse into the lives of the most important and influential Muslims in this country. Readers will be introduced to the daily lifestyle of Muslims in America, their connections to other Muslims around the world, the influence of Islamic nations on the shape of Muslim life in the United States, and Islam’s role in American history.” – Infobase/Facts on File

Keywords: Reference

 

Mohamed Nimor, The North American Muslim resource guide: Muslim community life in the United States and Canada (2002)

Summary: “In addition to providing an extensive directory of mainstream Muslim community organizations, The North American Muslim Resource Guide offers an overview of Muslim values and institutions, briefly traces the history of Islam in North America, and includes useful tables depicting the growth of the American Muslim population, as well as that of centers, organizations, and ethnic associations serving Islamic communities.” – Routledge

Keywords: Reference

 

Yvonne Hazbeck Haddad, The contemporary Islamic revival: a critical survey and bibliography (1991)

Summary: “This partially annotated bibliography lists available literature on the Islamic revival published in English between 1970 and 1988. Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad and her colleagues also provide background information and a special bibliography on women, Islamic banking, and Muslims in Europe and the United States.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Bibliography

+ SOCIOLOGY

Rosemary Corbett, Making moderate Islam: Sufism, service, and the “Ground Zero mosque” controversy (2016)

Summary: “Refutes the idea that current demands for Muslim moderation have primarily arisen in response to the events of 9/11, or to the violence often depicted in the media as unique to Muslims. Instead, it looks at a century of pressures on religious minorities to conform to dominant American frameworks for race, gender, and political economy… Calls for Muslim moderation in particular are also colored by racist and orientalist stereotypes about the inherent pacifism of Sufis with respect to other groups.” – Stanford University Press

Keywords: Multiculturalism; Terrorism

 

Nahid Afrose Kabir, Muslim Americans: debating the notions of American and un-American (2016)

Summary: “Taking as its point of departure the question of the compatibility of Islam and democracy, this book examines Muslims’ sense of belonging in American society. Based on extensive interview data across seven states in the US, the author explores the question of what it means to be American or un-American amongst Muslims, offering insights into common views of community, culture, and wider society. Through a combination of interviewees’ responses and discourse analysis of print media, Muslim Americans also raises the question of whether media coverage of the issue might itself be considered ‘un-American’.” – Routledge

Keywords: Identity; Media

 

Su’ad Abdul Khabeer, Muslim cool: race, religion, and hip hop in the United States (2016)

Summary: “Muslim Cool is a way of being an American Muslim—displayed in ideas, dress, social activism in the ’hood, and in complex relationships to state power. Constructed through hip hop and the performance of Blackness, Muslim Cool is a way of engaging with the Black American experience by both Black and non-Black young Muslims that challenges racist norms in the U.S. as well as dominant ethnic and religious structures within American Muslim communities. Drawing on over two years of ethnographic research, Su’ad Abdul Khabeer illuminates the ways in which young and multiethnic U.S. Muslims draw on Blackness to construct their identities as Muslims.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Media; Youth

 

Sunaina Marr Maira, The 9/11 generation: youth, rights and solidarity in the War on Terror (2016)

Summary: “Uses extensive ethnography to understand the meaning of political subjecthood and mobilization for Arab, South Asian, and Afghan American youth. Maira explores how young people from communities targeted in the War on Terror engage with the “political,” forging coalitions based on new racial and ethnic categories, even while they are under constant scrutiny and surveillance, and organizing around notions of civil rights and human rights.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Terrorism; Youth

 

Christopher A. Bail, Terrified: how anti-Muslim fringe organizations became mainstream (2015)

Summary: “Drawing on cultural sociology, social network theory, and social psychology, [Bail] shows how anti-Muslim organizations gained visibility in the public sphere, commandeered a sense of legitimacy, and redefined the contours of contemporary debate, shifting it ever outward toward the fringe. Bail illustrates his pioneering theoretical argument through a big-data analysis of more than one hundred organizations struggling to shape public discourse about Islam.” – Princeton University Press

Keywords: Media

 

Patrick D. Bowen, A history of conversion to Islam in the United States, volume 1: white American Muslims before 1975 (2015)

Summary: “The first in-depth study of the thousands of white Americans who embraced Islam between 1800 and 1975. Drawing from little-known archives, interviews, and rare books and periodicals, Patrick D. Bowen unravels the complex social and religious factors that led to the emergence of a wide variety of American Muslim and Sufi conversion movements.” – Brill

Keywords: Converts; History

 

Fawzia Reza, The effects of the September 11th terrorist attack on Pakistani-American parental involvement in U.S. schools (2015)

Summary: “Examines the challenges that Pakistani-American families have faced in their attempts to assimilate within the U.S. school culture since the September eleventh terrorist attack. Negative stereotyping has permeated into schools, and affected Pakistani-American students and their families. Reza examines this phenomenon from a parental lens in order to describe how 9/11 has altered the involvement of Pakistani-American parents in their children’s schools, and whether or not schools are appropriately addressing these issues and concerns.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Education; Youth

 

 

Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na’im, What is an American Muslim?: embracing faith and citizenship (2014)

Summary: “Muslims, An-Na’im argues, must embrace the full range of rights and responsibilities that come with American citizenship, and participate fully in civic life, while at the same time asserting their right to define their faith for themselves. They must view themselves, simply, as American citizens who happen to be Muslims.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Identity

 

Andrew Garrod, Growing up Muslim: Muslim college students in America tell their life stories (2014)

Summary: “Present[s] fourteen personal essays by college students of the Muslim faith who are themselves immigrants or are the children of immigrants to the United States. In their essays, the students grapple with matters of ethnicity, religious prejudice and misunderstanding, and what is termed Islamophobia. The fact of 9/11 and subsequent surveillance and suspicion of Islamic Americans (particularly those hailing from the Middle East and the Asian Subcontinent) have had a profound effect on these students, their families, and their communities of origin.” – Cornell University Press

Keywords: Education; Youth

 

Ayesha Mattu, Salaam, love: American Muslim men on love, sex, and intimacy (2014)

Summary: “Ayesha Mattu and Nura Maznavi provide a space for American Muslim men to speak openly about their romantic lives, offering frank, funny, and insightful glimpses into their hearts—and bedrooms. The twenty-two writers come from a broad spectrum of ethnic, racial, and religious perspectives—including orthodox, cultural, and secular Muslims—reflecting the strength and diversity of their faith community and of America.” – Beacon Press

Keywords: Gender; Sex

 

Dawn-Marie Gibson, Women of the Nation: between black protest and Sunni Islam (2014)

Summary: “Draws on oral histories and interviews with approximately 100 women across several cities to provide an overview of women’s historical contributions and their varied experiences of the NOI, including both its continuing community under Farrakhan and its offshoot into Sunni Islam under Imam W.D. Mohammed. The authors examine how women have interpreted and navigated the NOI’s gender ideologies and practices, illuminating the experiences of African-American, Latina, and Native American women within the NOI and their changing roles within this patriarchal movement.” – New York University Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Women

 

Liz Jackson, Muslims and Islam in U. S. education: reconsidering multiculturalism (2014)

Summary: “Explores the complex interface that exists between U.S. school curriculum, teaching practice about religion in public schools, societal and teacher attitudes toward Islam and Muslims, and multiculturalism as a framework for meeting the needs of minority group students. It presents multiculturalism as a concept that needs to be rethought and reformulated in the interest of creating a more democratic, inclusive, and informed society.” – Routledge

Keywords: Education; Multiculturalism; Youth

 

Nahid Afrose Kabir, Young American Muslims: dynamics of identity (2014)

Summary: “presents a journey into the ideas, outlooks and identity of young Muslims in America today. Based on around 400 in-depth interviews with young Muslims from Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York and Virginia, all the richness and nuance of these minority voices can be heard.” – Edinburgh University Press

Keywords: Youth

 

Shabana Mir, Muslim American women on campus: undergraduate social life and identity (2014)

Summary: “Illuminates the processes by which a group of ethnically diverse American college women, all identifying as Muslim and all raised in the United States, construct their identities during one of the most formative times in their lives. …Focuses on key leisure practices–drinking, dating, and fashion–to probe how Muslim American students adapt to campus life and build social networks that are seamlessly American, Muslim, and youthful.” – University of North Carolina Press

Keywords: Education; Women; Youth

 

Samina Yasmeen, Muslim citizens in the West: spaces and agents of inclusion and exclusion (2014)

Summary: “Drawing upon original case studies spanning North America, Europe and Australia, Muslim Citizens in the West explores how Muslims have been both the excluded and the excluders within the wider societies in which they live. …The cases examined show how these tendencies span geographical, ethnic and gender divides and can be encouraged by a combination of international and national developments prompting some groups to identify wider society as the ‘other’.” – Routledge

Keywords: Gender; Identity; Transnational

 

Mucahit Bilici, Finding Mecca in America: how Islam is becoming an American religion (2013)

Summary: “Traces American Muslims’ progress from outsiders to natives and from immigrants to citizens. …develops a novel sociological approach and offers insights into the civil rights activities of Muslim Americans, their increasing efforts at interfaith dialogue, and the recent phenomenon of Muslim ethnic comedy.” – University of Chicago Press

Keywords: Interfaith Relations; New Immigrants

 

Zareena Grewal, Islam is a foreign country: American Muslims and the global crisis of authority (2013)

Summary: “By examining the tension between American Muslims’ ambivalence toward the American mainstream and their desire to enter it, Grewal puts contemporary debates about Islam in the context of a long history of American racial and religious exclusions. Probing the competing obligations of American Muslims to the nation and to the umma (the global community of Muslim believers), Islam is a Foreign Country investigates the meaning of American citizenship and the place of Islam in a global age.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Transnational; Youth

 

Scott Korb, Light without fire: the making of America’s first Muslim college (2013)

Summary: “Tells the story of [Zaytuna College’s] founders, Sheikh Hamza Yusuf and Imam Zaid Shakir, arguably the two most influential leaders in American Islam, ‘rock stars’ who, tellingly, are little known outside their community. Korb also introduces us to Zaytuna’s students, young American Muslims of all stripes who admire—indeed, love—their teachers in ways college students typically don’t and whose stories, told for the first time, signal the future of Islam in this country.” – Beacon Press

Keywords: Education; Youth

 

Samory Rasheed, Black Muslims in the U.S.: history, politics, and the struggle of a community (2013)

Summary: “Seeks to address deficiencies in current scholarship about black Muslims in American society, from examining the origins of Islam among African-Americans to acknowledging the influential role that black Muslims play in contemporary U.S. society.” – Palgrave MacMillan

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Wajahat Ali, All-American: 45 American men on being Muslim (2012)

Summary: “A unique collection of stories shattering the misconceptions surrounding American Muslim men through honest, accessible, personal essays.” – White Cloud Press

Keywords: Gender; Identity

 

Juliane Hammer, American Muslim women, religious authority, and activism: more than a prayer (2012)

Summary: “Hammer looks at the work of significant female American Muslim writers, scholars, and activists, using their writings as a lens for a larger discussion of Muslim intellectual production in America and beyond. Centered on the controversial women-led Friday prayer in March 2005, Hammer uses this event and its aftermath to address themes of faith, community, and public opinion.” – University of Texas Press

Keywords: Gender

 

Mustafa Khattab, The Nation of Islam: the history, ideology and development of the Black Muslim movement in America (2012)

Summary: “Explores the origins of the NOI ideology and its impact on other Muslim and black nationalist groups in the US. This book, probably the first scholarly work ever on the NOI by an Arab-Muslim from a prestigious institution of higher learning such as Al-Azhar University, is instrumental in understanding the history, future, and progress of Islam in America & the African-American community.” – Lambert Academic Publishing

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Ayesha Mattu, Love, InshAllah: the secret love lives of American Muslim women (2012)

Summary: “25 American Muslim writers sweep aside stereotypes to share their search for love openly for the first time, showing just how varied the search for love can be–from singles’ events and online dating, to college flirtations and arranged marriages, all with a uniquely Muslim twist.” – Soft Skull Press

Keywords: Gender; Sex

 

Nadine Christine Naber, Arab America: gender, cultural politics, and activism (2012)

Summary: “Tells the stories of second generation Arab American young adults living in the San Francisco Bay Area, most of whom are political activists engaged in two culturalist movements that draw on the conditions of diaspora, a Muslim global justice and a Leftist Arab movement. Writing from a transnational feminist perspective, Naber reveals the complex and at times contradictory cultural and political processes through which Arabness is forged in the contemporary United States.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; Gender; Youth

 

Maria M. Ebrahimji, I speak for myself: American women on being Muslim (2011)

Summary: “40 American women under the age of 40 share their experiences of their lives as Muslim women in America. While their commonality is faith and citizenship, their voices and their messages are very different. …Each personal story is a contribution to the larger narrative of life stories and life work of a new generation of Muslim women.” – White Cloud Press

Keywords: Gender

 

Anouar Majid, Islam and America: building a future without prejudice (2011)

Summary: “Majid, born in Morocco, raised a Muslim, educated in the U.S., and now an American, offers a personal view of the tensions between the U.S. and Islam and the foundation for moving forward. He begins, and ends, with the revolutionary idea that embodies the U.S.: the promise of liberty, free inquiry, new ideas, and a democratic spirit and the hope it engenders. In between, he argues that both sides have used sacred scriptures and unexamined religious beliefs to justify social injustice, misguided foreign-policy choices, and acts of aggression.” – Booklist

Keywords: Biography

 

Peter Morey, Framing Muslims: stereotyping and representation after 9/11 (2011)

Summary: “Dissect[s] the ways in which stereotypes depicting Muslims as an inherently problematic presence in the West are constructed, deployed, and circulated in the public imagination, producing an immense gulf between representation and a considerably more complex reality. Crucially, they show that these stereotypes are not solely the province of crude-minded demagogues and their tabloid megaphones, but multiply as well from the lips of supposedly progressive elites, even those who presume to speak “from within,” on Muslims’ behalf.” – Harvard University Press

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Samir Abu-Absi, Arab Americans in Toledo (2010)

Summary: “Toledo’s Arab American experience is a great American story of an ethnic community finding fertile soil, sinking roots and flourishing. This has been the story of ethnic groups whose American experience predates that of Arab Americans and it is being written anew by more recent immigrant communities.” – University of Toledo Press

Keywords: Arab Americans; Ohio

 

Akbar Ahmed, Journey into America: the challenge of Islam (2010)

Summary: “To shed light on this increasingly important religious group and counter mutual distrust, renowned scholar Akbar Ahmed conducted the most comprehensive study to date of the American Muslim community. Journey into America explores and documents how Muslims are fitting into U.S. society, placing their experience within the larger context of American identity. This eye-opening book also offers a fresh and insightful perspective on American history and society.” – Brookings Institution Press

Keywords: Identity; Mosques

 

Stephan Salisbury, Mohamed’s ghosts: an American story of love and fear in the homeland (2010)

Summary: “As he explores events centered on what he calls “the poor streets of Frankford Valley” in Philadelphia, or the empty streets of Brooklyn , or the fear-encrusted precincts of Lodi, California and beyond, Salisbury is constantly reminded of similar incidents in his own past–the paranoia and police activity that surrounded his political involvement in the 1960s, and the surveillance and informing that dogged his father, a well-known New York Times reporter and editor, for half a century.” – Public Affairs Books

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Linda Brandi Cateura, Voices of American Muslims: 23 profiles (2009)

Summary: “American Muslims from all walks of life introduce themselves and the many faces of Islam in America. These individuals include the head of New York’s largest mosque, an actress, a cabdriver and many others. These first-person narratives, drawn from personal interviews conducted by the author, are frank and offer insights rarely experienced in most Americans’ relations with their Muslim neighbours.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Identity

 

Sarah M.A. Gualtieri, Between Arab and white: race and ethnicity in the early Syrian American diaspora (2009)

Summary: “presents an original analysis of the ways in which people mainly from current day Lebanon and Syria—the largest group of Arabic-speaking immigrants before World War II—came to view themselves in racial terms and position themselves within racial hierarchies as part of a broader process of ethnic identity formation.” – University of California Press

Keywords: Arabs; New Immigrants; Syria

 

Hamid Reza Kusha, Islam in American prisons: black Muslims’ challenge to American penology (2009)

Summary: “The growth of Islam both worldwide and particularly in the United States is especially notable among African-American inmates incarcerated in American state and federal penitentiaries. …This new study examines this multifaceted phenomenon and makes a powerful argument for the objective examination of the rehabilitative potentials of faith-based organizations in prisons, including the faith of those who convert to Islam.” – Routledge

Keywords: Prisons

 

Sunaina Marr Maira, Missing: youth, citizenship, and empire after 9/11 (2009)

Summary: “Drawing on ethnographic research in a New England high school, Maira investigates the cultural dimensions of citizenship for South Asian Muslim students and their relationship to the state in the everyday contexts of education, labor, leisure, dissent, betrayal, and loss. The narratives of the mostly working-class youth she focuses on demonstrate how cultural citizenship is produced in school, at home, at work, and in popular culture.” – Duke University Press

Keywords: Education; South Asians; Youth

 

Alia Malek, A country called Amreeka: Arab roots, American stories (2009)

Summary: “The history of Arab settlement in the United States stretches back nearly as far as the history of America itself. For the first time, Alia Malek brings this history to life. In each of eleven spellbinding chapters, she inhabits the voice and life of one Arab American, at one time-stopping historical moment.” – Simon & Schuster

Keywords: Arab Americans

 

Manning Marable, Black routes to Islam (2009)

Summary: “Starting with the 19th century narratives of African American travelers to the Holy Land, the following chapters probe Islam’s role in urban social movements, music and popular culture, gender dynamics, relations between African Americans and Muslim immigrants, and the racial politics of American Islam with the ongoing war in Iraq.” – Palgrave MacMillan

Keywords: African-Americans

 

Zarinah El-Amin Naeem, Jihad of the soul: singlehood and the search for love in Muslim America (2009)

Summary: “An anthropological exploration into the attitudes, experiences and emotions of single Muslim young adults between the ages of 18-40.” – Western Michigan University Press

Keywords: Identity; Youth

 

Christopher M. Stonebanks, Muslim voices in school: narratives of identity and pluralism (2009)

Summary: “The politics and education about Islam, Muslims, Arabs, Turks, Iranians and all that is associated with the West’s popular imagination of the monolithic ‘Middle-East’ has long been framed within problematics. The goal of this book is to push back against the reductive mainstream narratives told about Muslim and Middle Eastern heritage students for generations if not centuries, in mainstream schools. The chapters are each authored by Muslim-acculturated scholars.” – Sense Publishers

Keywords: Education; Youth

 

John Tehranian, Whitewashed: America’s invisible Middle Eastern minority (2009)

Summary: “Unlike many other racial minorities in our country, Middle Eastern Americans have faced rising, rather than diminishing, degrees of discrimination over time; a fact highlighted by recent targeted immigration policies, racial profiling, a war on terrorism with a decided racialist bent, and growing rates of job discrimination and hate crime. Oddly enough, however, Middle Eastern Americans are not even considered a minority in official government data. Instead, they are deemed white by law….Tehranian combines his own personal experiences as an Iranian American with an expert’s analysis of current events, legal trends, and critical theory to analyze this bizarre Catch-22 of Middle Eastern racial classification.” – New York University Press

Keywords: Arabs; Civil Rights

 

Nader Ayish, Stereotypes and Arab American Muslim high school students (2008)

Summary: “In an effort to better understand this diverse community, this study investigated how five Arab American Muslim high school students perceive and cope with stereotypes and the way their culture and religion is portrayed in film, the media, popular culture, and school curricula.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Arabs; Education; Youth

 

Moustafa Bayoumi, How does it feel to be a problem?: being young and Arab in America (2008)

Summary: “Bayoumi takes readers into the lives of seven twenty-somethings living in Brooklyn, home to the largest Arab-American population in the United States. He moves beyond stereotypes and clichés to reveal their often unseen struggles, from being subjected to government surveillance to the indignities of workplace discrimination.” – Penguin Random House

Keywords: Arabs; Civil Rights

 

Katherine Pratt Ewing, Being and belonging: Muslims in the United States since 9/11 (2008)

Summary: “Katherine Pratt Ewing leads a group of anthropologists, sociologists, and cultural studies experts in exploring how the events of September 11th have affected the quest for belonging and identity among Muslims in America—for better and for worse. From Chicago to Detroit to San Francisco, Being and Belonging takes readers on an extensive tour of Muslim America—inside mosques, through high school hallways, and along inner city streets.” – Russell Sage Foundation

Keywords: Civil Rights

 

Dalel B. Khalil, From veils to thongs: an Arab chick’s survival guide to balancing one’s ethnic identity in America (2008)

Summary: “One who is both Arab and American is very often, very confused. Her one foot is planted firmly in a traditional world whose cultural rules haven’t changed in over 2,000 years. Her other foot is skidding on a thin piece of ice, the mega-liberal free-for-all, called America. And she is trying to balance walking on both. This hilarious, lighthearted survival guide explains how to retain one’s sanity in the battle of the ultimate culture clash.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Gender; Identity

 

Anjana Narayna, Living our religions: Hindu and Muslim South Asian-American women narrate their experiences (2008)

Summary:Living Our Religions sheds important light on the lives of Hindu and Muslim American women of South Asian origin. As the authors reveal their diverse and culturally dynamic religious practices, describe the race, gender, and ethnic boundaries that they encounter, and document how they resist and challenge these boundaries, they cut through the myths and ethnocentrism of popular portrayals to reveal the vibrancy, courage, and agency of an “invisible” minority.” – Lynne Rienner Publishers

Keywords: Gender; South Asians

 

Paul M. Barrett, American Islam: the struggle for the soul of a religion (2007)

Summary: “Barrett tells seven stories of American Muslims in all their stereotype-defying complexity.” – Palgrave MacMillan

Keywords: Identity; Media

 

Brigitte L. Nacos, Fueling our fears: stereotyping, media coverage, and public opinion of Muslim Americans (2007)

Summary: “After September 11, many in the American public and media zeroed in on Muslims in America and the world, irresponsibly linking―intentionally or not―Muslims at large with terrorism. This well-researched book explores this focus and its implications. At the same time, the authors do not leave out the opinion of Muslim Americans, exploring their views about the American media and its influence, their attitudes toward non-Muslim Americans and, just as important, their opinions on post–9/11 U.S. counterterrorist policies and practices.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Media; Terrorism

 

Anna Mansson McGinty, Becoming Muslim: Western women’s conversions to Islam (2006)

Summary: “While Islam has become a controversial topic in the West, a growing number of Westerners find powerful meaning in Islam. Becoming Muslim is an ethnographic study based on in-depth interviews with Swedish and American women who have converted to Islam.” – Palgrave MacMillan

Keywords: Converts; Gender

 

Asra Q. Nomani, Standing alone: an American woman’s struggle for the soul of Islam (2006)

Summary: “Nomani shows how many of the freedoms enjoyed centuries ago have been erased by the conservative brand of Islam practiced today, giving the West a false image of Muslim women as veiled and isolated from the world.” – HarperCollins

Keywords: Gender

 

Karin van Nieuwkerk, Women embracing Islam: gender and conversion in the West (2006)

Summary: “In this vanguard study of gender and conversion to Islam, leading historians, sociologists, anthropologists, and theologians investigate why non-Muslim women in the United States, several European countries, and South Africa are converting to Islam. Drawing on extensive interviews with female converts, the authors explore the life experiences that lead Western women to adopt Islam, as well as the appeal that various forms of Islam, as well as the Nation of Islam, have for women.” – University of Texas Press

Keywords: Converts; Gender

 

Donna Gehrke White, The face behind the veil: the extraordinary lives of Muslim women in America (2006)

Summary: “Provides a rare, revealing look into the hearts, minds, and everyday lives of Muslim women in America and opens a window on a culture as diverse as it is misunderstood.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Gender; Hijab

 

Saleemah Abdul-Ghafur, Living Islam out loud: American Muslim women speak (2005)

Summary: “Living Islam Out Loud presents the first generation of American Muslim women who have always identified as both American and Muslim. These pioneers have forged new identities for themselves and for future generations, and they speak out about the hijab, relationships, sex and sexuality, activism, spirituality, and much more.” – Beacon Press

Keywords: Gender; Identity

 

Fawzia Afzal-Khan, Shattering the stereotypes: Muslim women speak out (2005)

Summary: “In this ambitious volume that includes essays, poetry, fiction, memoir, plays, and artwork, Muslim women speak for themselves, revealing a complexity of experience and thought that escapes most Western portrayals. Islam is, as editor Fawzia Afzal-Khan puts it, only “one spoke in the wheel of our lives.”” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Culture; Gender; Identity

 

Loukia K. Sarroub, All American Yemeni girls: being Muslim in a public school (2005)

Summary: “Based on more than two years of fieldwork conducted in a Yemeni community in southeastern Michigan, this unique study examines Yemeni American girls’ attempts to construct and make sense of their identities as Yemenis, Muslims, Americans, daughters of immigrants, teenagers, and high school students.” – University of Pennsylvania Press

Keywords: Gender; Identity; Yemen; Youth

 

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Muslims in the United States: identity, influence, innovation (2005)

Summary: Proceedings of conferences sponsored by the Division of U.S. Studies, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, in 2003 and 2005. Topics include issues affecting Muslims in the United States; the impact American Muslims are having around the world; and pluralism and gender in Islam.

Keywords: Identity

 

Mbaye Lo, Muslims in America: race, politics, and community building (2004)

Summary: “Mabye takes the mosque as his paradigm to analyze and synthesize the growth of Muslim communities in Cleveland; how their mosques developed over time, the challenges they faced, in moving to mainstream Islam and developing a multi-ethnic community.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Mosques; Ohio

 

Mahmood Mamdani, Good Muslim, bad Muslim: America, the Cold War, and the roots of terror (2004)

Summary: “Distinguished political scientist and anthropologist Mahmood Mamdani brings his expertise and insight to bear on a question many Americans have been asking since 9/11: how did this happen?” – Penguin Random House

Keywords: Civil Rights; Terrorism

 

Carolyn Moxley Rouse, Engaged surrender: African American women and Islam (2004)

Summary: “In Engaged Surrender, Islam becomes a unique prism for clarifying the role of faith in contemporary black women’s experience. Through these women’s stories, Rouse reveals how commitment to Islam refracts complex processes—urbanization, political and social radicalization, and deindustrialization—that shape black lives generally, and black women’s lives in particular. Rather than focusing on traditional (and deeply male) ideas of autonomy and supremacy, the book—and the community of women it depicts—emphasizes more holistic notions of collective obligation, personal humility, and commitment to overarching codes of conduct and belief.” – University of California Press

Keywords: African-Americans; Gender

 

Michael Wolfe, Taking back Islam: American Muslims reclaim their faith (2003)

Summary: “Noted Islamic authority Michael Wolfe moderates 35 expert speakers, writers and leaders, including Yusuf Islam (Cat Stevens) and Karen Armstrong. They discuss the future of Islam, tear down false stereotypes, review the historical realities that have shaped the religion, and examine paradoxes and schisms within the faith.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Interfaith Relations; Media

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Muslim minorities in the West: visible and invisible (2002)

Summary: “noted scholars Haddad and Smith bring together outstanding essays on the distinct experiences of minority Muslim communities from Detroit, Michigan to Perth, Australia and the wide range of issues facing them. Haddad and Smith in their introduction trace the broad contours of the Muslim experience in Europe, America and other areas of European settlement and shed light on the common questions minority Muslims face of assimilation, discrimination, evangelism, and politics.” – Rowman & Littlefield

Keywords: Arabs; Identity

 

Muqteda Khan, American Muslims: bridging faith and freedom (2002)

Summary: A collection of essays on a range of topics related to American Muslims.

 

Anan Ameri, Arab Americans in metro Detroit: a pictorial history (2001)

Summary: “Through more than 180 images, this book portrays the challenges and triumphs of Arabs as they preserve their families, and build churches, mosques, restaurants, businesses, and institutions, thus contributing to Detroit’s efforts in regaining its position as a world class city.” – Arcadia Publishing

Keywords: Arabs; Michigan

 

Ihsan Bagby, The mosque in America: a national portrait (2001)

Summary: “This report presents findings from the Mosque Study Project 2000, the largest, most comprehensive survey of mosques ever to be conducted in the United States. The purpose of the Study is twofold: to provide a comprehensive, detailed portrait of mosques, which can be subsequently used by mosque leaders and Muslim scholars to envision ways to strengthen mosques. Secondly the Study provides a public profile of mosques that will hopefully further the understanding of the Muslim presence in America.” – from document introduction

Keywords: Mosques

 

Paul Findley, Silent no more: confronting America’s false images of Islam (2001)

Summary: “Paul Findley, a 22-year veteran of Congress, chronicles his long, far-flung trail of discovery through the World Of Islam: the false stereotypes that linger in the minds of the American people, the corrective actions that the leaders of America’s seven million Muslims are undertaking, and the community’s remarkable progress in mainstream politics.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Civil Rights; Media

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, Muslims on the Americanization path? (2000)

Summary: “Like all religious minorities in America, Muslims must confront a host of difficult questions concerning faith and national identity…While the Muslims of America are indeed on the path to Americanization, what that means and what that will yield remains uncertain.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Identity

 

Michael W. Suleiman, Arabs in America: building a new future (1999)

Summary: “The contributors discuss an assortment of different communities…in order to illustrate the range of Arab emigre experience. More broadly, they examine Arabs in the legal system, youth and family, health and welfare, as well as Arab-American identity, political activism, and attempts by Arab immigrants to achieve respect and recognition in their new homes. They address both the present situation for Arab-Americans and prospects for their future.” – Temple University Press

Keywords: Arabs; New Immigrants

 

Gisela Webb, Windows of faith: Muslim women scholar-activists of North America (1999)

Summary: “These essays by Islamic women scholars in the USA give voice to and are evidence of the growing network of Muslim women involved with the issues of women’s human rights through scholarship activism.” – Amazon.com

Keywords: Gender; Human Rights

 

Shamita Das Dasgupta, A patchwork shawl: chronicles of South Asian women in America (1998)

Summary: “Sheds light on the lives of a segment of the U.S. immigrant population that has long been relegated to the margins. It focuses on women’s lives that span different worlds: Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, and the United States. This collection of essays by and about South Asian women in America challenges stereotypes by allowing women to speak in their own words. Together they provide discerning insights into the reconstruction of immigrant patriarchy in a new world, and the development of women’s resistance to that reconstruction.” – Rutgers University Press

Keywords:

 

Khalid M. Alkhazraji, Immigrants and cultural adaptation in the American workplace: a study of Muslim employees (1997)

Summary: “This book presents a model of employee acculturation, investigating how Muslim employees adapt to U.S. national and organizational cultures. …Responses from 339 Muslims revealed that most were inclined to retain their original culture rather than adopting U.S. national culture. In contrast, most accepted U.S. organizational cultures.” – Google Books

Keywords: New Immigrants

 

Evelyn Shakir, Bint Arab: Arab and Arab American women in the United States (1997)

Summary: “While attempting to correct stereotypes that picture Arab women as passive, mindless, and downtrodden, Shakir gives voice to women caught in a tug of war, usually waged within the family, between traditional values and the social and sexual liberties permitted women in the West. Complicating that battle has been the American suspicion of Arab peoples, which has sometimes pushed women―as guardians of a culture under attack―to resist the blandishments of American society.” – ABC-CLIO/Praeger

Keywords: Arabs; Gender

 

Carol L. Anway, Daughters of another path: experiences of American women choosing Islam (1995)

Summary: “Includes portions of stories from fifty-three American born women who have chosen to become Muslim. Why and how they came to Islam; what their lives are like as a result of that choice; How non-Muslims can relate to Muslims that are relatives, friends, co-workers, and acquaintances.” – Midwest Book Review

Keywords: Converts; Gender

 

Steven Barboza, American jihad: Islam after Malcolm X (1995)

Summary: “Introduces 50 members of the growing American Muslim population. With gentle proselytizing, the narratives and interviews relate conversion memories, immigrant tales, and other anecdotes about the U.S. Islamic experiences… Barboza conveys the impact of Malcolm X on Islam’s rapid growth and the American Muslims’ struggle for acceptance while trying to cultivate our understanding of the religion through conversations with diverse practitioners.” – Library Journal

Keywords: African Americans

 

C. Eric Lincoln, The black Muslims in America (3rd ed. 1994)

Summary: “This classic sociological study gives a concise, accessible introduction to Islam for Americans whose knowledge of religion is limited primarily to Judeo-Christianity. The book succinctly details the formation and development of the Black Muslim movement through its wide-ranging expressions in America today — a movement born as an organized form of religious and social protest against a society sharply divided by race. This edition includes a new foreword by Aminah B. McCloud, a new preface, and an extensive postscript by Lincoln in which he outlines the course of the Nation of Islam since the death of its formative leader, Elijah Muhammad …A section highlighting the public career of Malcolm X, Elijah Muhammad’s famous spokesperson turned cultural icon, is also included. ” – Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.

Keywords: African-Americans; Nation of Islam

 

Yvonne Yazbeck Haddad, The Muslims of America (1993)

Summary: “Focusing on the manner in which American Muslims adapt their institutions as they become increasingly an indigenous part of America, the essays discuss American Muslim self-images, perceptions of Muslims by non-Muslim Americans, leading American Muslim intellectuals, political activity of Muslims in America, Muslims in American prisons, Islamic education, the status of Muslim women in America, and the impact of American foreign policy on Muslims in the United States.” – Oxford University Press

Keywords: Gender; Identity; Prisons

 

Hakim Muhammed Rashid, In search of the path: socialization, education and the African-American Muslim (1989)

Keywords: African-Americans; Education

 

Elaine Hagopian, Arab Americans: a study in assimilation (1969)

Summary: A collection of papers including “The New Arab-American Community”, “The Woman’s Role in the Socialization of Syrian Americans in Chicago”, and “Nationalism and Traditional Preservations”.

Keywords: Arabs